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Old November 4, 2008, 11:20 PM   #1
jrtayloriv
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Join Date: November 4, 2008
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Just got a PTR 91 -- have a few questions ...

I just purchased a PTR 91 KF recently from JLD, and I have a few questions about it (the manual that it came with sucks ...):

1) Where do I get this elevation adjustment tool? Or better still, how do I make one myself? I saw something about using needlenose pliers, but mine seem way too big to fit (maybe I will get myself a smaller pair ...)

2) What exactly are the four aperture settings on the rear site for -- that is, what determines which one should be used? Does anyone have a good link to what the sight picture should look like for the "V" sight (#1)?

3) What is the best valued scope mount? I don't want to spend TOO much, but I don't want a wobbly POS either. Ideally I'd like something that would enable me to still look through the iron sights, but only if it's comfortable to use without having to modify the stock to raise my cheek up ...

4) Any ideas about where to find CHEAP bulk .308 rounds?

Thanks for taking the time to answer all of these ... I might have more questions later ...

--J. Taylor
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Old November 5, 2008, 01:58 AM   #2
blhseawa
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First, couple of pieces of background information for you. The PTR-91 is based upon the civilian version of the German G3. The G3 for Germany was made by the company Heckler & Koch. Hecker & Koch (often just HK) released a civilian version called the HK-91. The standard rear site is has four positions intended for 100 meters ~ 400 meters. The adjustment tool for elevation is not cheap and you'll need to google for it. Some sites, may have the tool. It is not simple tool to make, and some people have used a skinny-nose pair of pliers, but I find this less than ideal. The actual HK tool or a US copy is your best bet.

Check google again, but you may be able to find HK 91 manual or better yet the maintenance manual for the G3 and that will answer most of your questions.

The PTR-91 and the HK 91 are semi-auto only versions of the G3, much like the AR-15 is a semi-auto version of the M16.

As for mount there are basically two mount type choices. The Arms mount is claw mount for the G3 - Type rifles (G3, HK91, etc) unfortunately these are not cheap, between $120 ~ $250, the other is allen wrench screw based M1913 rail mount, lot cheaper, but interferes with mechanical sight system, depending on source in $25 ~ $100 range. Then any good scope should do you.

Since the PTR-91 is a .308 win (308 nato) round, and good scope for 308 rifle with weaver rings should get you setup.

There is a German scope and mount designed by the German army for the G3 that includes a claw-type mount and 4x power these run $400 ~ $600 depending on condition and source. But any good hunting scope and rings with the right mount will meet your needs.

There are number of choices here and lot depends upon how much you want to send and whether it is made by HK or is a clone. Your rifle is referred to as clone, as it was not manufactured by HK.

Don't let that bother you, as the PTR-91 is made with Portuguese tooling. The Portuguese Army once used the G3 as the standard military rifle, after changed rifles types, the Portuguese government which acquired a manufacturing license and tooling from HK, sold the tooling and parts to JLD, which became the PTR-91 with the addition of some US parts.

IMHO the PTR-91 is a quality rifle. But you need to spend sometime becoming familiar with the G3/HK91 platform and available options for it.

Good luck.
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Old November 5, 2008, 03:12 AM   #3
NWCP
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I own a HK 91. The condition of my rifle is near pristine so I've opted to avoid using a scope on it. The claw mount leaves marks that I don't want to have. The HKs can command upwards of $2500 and more depending on condition these days. The sight adjustment tool is expensive and not always easy to locate, but worth owning. I've actually mounted a ghost ring sighting system on my 91 since I generally shoot out to 200 yards max. Works great for me. As for cheap .308... non corrosive surplus is commanding a premium these days and I don't see it getting any cheaper. The good stuff is running between $250 and $299 per 500 rounds. Still a sight cheaper than commercial ammo. I'll likely be buying another 500 rounds in the next couple of weeks. That should hold me over for a bit. I tend not to use my 91 as much as my other rifles although it is an absolute blast to shoot. Simply a matter of the cost of ammo. A coupe of things you should know about this particular family of rifles. If you've never shot one they are loud. The recoil is stout, but not uncomfortable and they tend to not only eject brass quite a distance they are also pretty rough on it. On the plus side the magazines are easy to obtain and reasonably priced if you buy surplus. The guns are accurate and well made. Take down is relatively simple which makes cleaning less of a chore. Read up on the roller locking system and how it all goes together. First time disassembly and reassembly can be a challenge. Once you get the hang of it all goes well. Fortunately you don't have to take it down to that degree every time you clean it. Enjoy your new rifle.
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Old November 5, 2008, 08:21 AM   #4
stubbicatt
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hkparts dot net

Go to Adam Smith's site for HK parts. You will be able to find the sight adjustment tool there, as well as a plethora of other items you might want.

If not Adam, then Robert RTG parts has the port buffers for about $50 or so, which if you reload your ammo, is a must have accessory.

The V notch is a very hasty sight, for CQB. You just have to experiment with it, but generally, assuming it has been sighted in correctly with the 200 meter aperture and all works as it should, the front sight ring looks like it is sitting in the "bowl" of the rear sight notch. If you simply must hit something accurately inside 25 meters, you can center the front post in the little tiny notch in the rear sight, sort of like a pistol sight system.

But take it to the range and see how it works for you with different sight pictures.
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Old November 5, 2008, 10:44 AM   #5
David the Gnome
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Just in case anyone else was curious as to what a PTR 91 KF was:



Looks like a lot of fun.
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Old November 5, 2008, 02:15 PM   #6
jrtayloriv
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Quote:
Looks like a lot of fun.
Hell yes it is! Got a chance to take it out into the woods behind my place yesterday, and run a few rounds through it.

The recoil wasn't nearly as bad as expected for a .308, but I'm still looking for where it threw my brass off too

It was very precise -- especially for a semi-auto -- but still needs to be sighted in for accuracy ... it put my Oly Arms AR to shame.

I couldn't get the hang of the "V" sight, and didn't want to waste too much 75-cent per round ammo figuring it out (I haven't ordered ammo for it in bulk yet so I'm shooting Winchester Super-X through it ... $$$$$$$). But the peep sight worked beautifully -- much more intuitive to me than my AR (which has A1 sights) ...

Quote:
The standard rear site is has four positions intended for 100 meters ~ 400 meters
I'm assuming you mean that the V is for 100m, #2 is for 200m, etc ... correct? Visually, I couldn't notice a difference between #2,#3,#4 ... and, of those, I only shot it while set on #2. What exactly is happening when I rotate the rear site? Is it just changing the elevation in "big chunks" whereas the tool would be used to get finer control over it?

On a side note, what in the world were they thinking when they decided to make it use a special tool to adjust elevation? Is there some superfantastic benefit to this that I'm not aware of?

Quote:
Go to Adam Smith's site for HK parts.
I tried a google search for "adam smith ptr parts" and "adam smith hk parts" and a few other variants ... no luck. Which site were you talking about?

Thanks for all of the info
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Old November 5, 2008, 07:45 PM   #7
Slamfire
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Quote:
I couldn't get the hang of the "V" sight, and didn't want to waste too much 75-cent per round ammo figuring it out (I haven't ordered ammo for it in bulk yet so I'm shooting Winchester Super-X through it ... $$$$$$$). But the peep sight worked beautifully -- much more intuitive to me than my AR (which has A1 sights) ...
PTR has rear sights with a 100 yard aperature. I bought one and replaced the V notch rear sight.

They also sell a bolt tool, which I think is great. It holds the bolt head spring down while you slide the bolt head on. My bolt has a monster spring, and it is difficult getting that all together without the tool.

As for elevation adjustments. Look around for needle nose pliers that will fit into the rear sight notches. I found a set in my garage. This is a cheap solution, sometimes frustrating because you have to push in two pins at the same time, and hold them in, while you rotate the turret. You need three hands to do this, one to turn the turret and two to hold the pliers in place. Having only two hands I found the pliers will jump out, or I had only one pin pushed in.

I do recommend getting the port buffer.

I like my PTR, it is a great rifle.
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Old November 5, 2008, 10:14 PM   #8
jrtayloriv
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Slamfire -- thanks for the advice.

Quote:
As for elevation adjustments. Look around for needle nose pliers that will fit into the rear sight notches. I found a set in my garage. This is a cheap solution, sometimes frustrating because you have to push in two pins at the same time, and hold them in, while you rotate the turret. You need three hands to do this, one to turn the turret and two to hold the pliers in place. Having only two hands I found the pliers will jump out, or I had only one pin pushed in.
Do you have a welder? I was just thinking that since needlenose pliers are cheaper than the elevation tool -- you could just spread the pliers the right distance apart weld them at the "hinge" so that they maintain the correct position. Then you'd have a one-handed tool, which would probably be a lot more pleasant to use ... Anyhow, I'll be trying this -- I'll post up results.

Thanks again!
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Old November 5, 2008, 10:28 PM   #9
BuckHammer
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I recently bought a PTR 91 and I have a question about bipods. I have seen these bipods that fit toward the muzzle on the forearm. I have heard that you need some kind of "jungle forearm" that fits the bipod. Is that true and where can I get one and what is the most affordable bipod like that? By the way, I have noticed that the bipods are very expensive.

Thanks for the information so far, it has been very helpful
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