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Old October 31, 2008, 07:51 PM   #26
JohnH1963
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Let me get the purpose of the E2D straight.

I think this flashlight is supposed to be used as a last resort close quarters weapon. For example, your a police officer and searching a close quarters dark area with your E2D. Someone jumps out at you and the only weapon you have in your hand is the flashlight. You take the flashlight and hit the guy in the face allowing you enough time to back quickly away and draw your pistol.

I dont believe this flashlight is designed as say a primary defense tool.

I believe its designed for when you are searching and scoping an area where someone jumps out at you in surprise. However, I would sure like something that weighs a little more then 3.9 ounces.
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Old October 31, 2008, 08:05 PM   #27
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As a High School coach I carry one all the time. No problem having them in school and I have to go to the parking light at o-dark thirty iften.
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Old November 1, 2008, 05:54 AM   #28
Billy Sparks
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I think Threefeathers hit of something very important. It is the one thing that you can carry just about anywhere (other than a pen) that you can use as a weapon that has some heft to it.
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Old November 3, 2008, 04:48 PM   #29
black bear 84
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Steve Tarani used to teach defensive fighting with the strike bezels for the Surefire Institute.

Shown here delivering a carotic strike:



A number of strike bezels are available as aftermarket items:



And Surefire was a hit with their limited edition "Porcupine model"



And the Borealis have two optional bezels in stainless steel, a tall, heavy one with glow dots and a low profile with rounded crenellated.






Best regards
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Old November 3, 2008, 05:25 PM   #30
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The E2Defender has a "strike bezel" on the front for self-defense. As far as I can see, the "strike bezel" seems to make the flashlight twice as expensive.
From looking at the price list on their site, it looks like the increase in price is associated with the LED vs the "old" Incandesant. Not much difference between bezzel vs non bezzel LED's. That's Crannelated Bezzel to you laymen.


http://www.surefire.com/maxexp/main/...br/6/sesent/00

A word of caution: A friend reported serious clothing damage when he carried his in a coat pocket, over time (and not much, at that) rather than in a pouch on his belt.
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Old November 3, 2008, 10:22 PM   #31
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I believe its designed for when you are searching and scoping an area where someone jumps out at you in surprise. However, I would sure like something that weighs a little more then 3.9 ounces.
I think we're making things more complicated than they need to be. The bezel is rather sharp and serves the purpose of an edged weapon when used as such. Or it could be used to jab. It doesn't need to be heavy, that's why it has the bezel. Properly applied, it could very well buy you time to draw your pistol as a last resort, or get your tail out of there.
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Old November 4, 2008, 05:46 AM   #32
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Properly applied, it could very well buy you time to draw your pistol as a last resort, or get your tail out of there.
Of course, I first need time to draw my strike bezel flashlight, properly apply it in order to draw my pistol...

I guess having a pseudo sharper edge on everything I own is a good thing, although everything with a sharp edge like that when marketed is marketed as some sort of super fighting tool. I really liked the image above to the carotid strike with the Surefire light. The 'carotid strike' always sounds really cool and with the Surefire, you can really make it possible...or so it would appear. I have seen this demonstrated with a variety of weapons ranging from car keys to credit cards, knifes, sticks, kubatons, and ball point pens.

From what I have seen, those most apt to be able to really apply such technology in the cool ninja-like manners often dramatically illustrated are those who already have considerable martial arts training, such as Steve Tarani. Is there anything that man can't use as a weapon?

I mean, come on, these bezels have been around for how long...and how many reports have we seen about their real world use in self defense?

Yes, I have one, too. With the incandescent and xenon bulbs, I just thought of it as a nice heated ice scraper...a tactical option not often readily reported and now no longer in favor because the LED units don't get hot enough to be helpful.
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Old November 4, 2008, 06:26 AM   #33
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Quote:
Properly applied, it could very well buy you time to draw your pistol as a last resort, or get your tail out of there.
Quote:
Of course, I first need time to draw my strike bezel flashlight, properly apply it in order to draw my pistol...
You know, Double Naught, I would have figured, with you knowing everything and all, that the prudence of having your light already in hand (in certain places) would be obvious. Especially since walking around with a gun in your hand seldom would be (prudent).

And just as obvious that drawing a gun might not be justified in some instances where using the light would suffice within the perameters of the law.

Quote:
Yes, I have one, too. With the incandescent and xenon bulbs, I just thought of it as a nice heated ice scraper...a tactical option not often readily reported and now no longer in favor because the LED units don't get hot enough to be helpful.
HUH? Oh right. How'd that work scraping the ice off your windshield with the worlds best permanent glass etcher? LOL Hey, not to worry with the LED being less hot. Just apply more pressure when you scrape. You can even etch your name right on there, too. (in case your car is stolen).

LOL- I owe you one, Double Naught, I was getting bored. Thanks for the laughs! Ah, Jeez, where's my sedatives?
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Old November 4, 2008, 07:50 AM   #34
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The sedative application is with the end opposite the strike bezel!

You can do just about anything with a 3.9 oz light, right?
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Old November 8, 2008, 12:35 AM   #35
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I bought one for my wife last year, for this time of year (fall/winter), as it gets dark before she has to walk to her car. I taught her how to carry it and use it. If confronted use the blinding light to temporarily stun, then strike - in the face - while stunned. Kick the 'privates' a couple times, run, then call the police and tell them to look for the guy with the bloody face walking funny.

Obviously, it wouldn't go down like that, but you get my point - bevels are better. To address the initial question, I believe it is a 'gimmick' because of the extra cost, but not for the potential operational capabilities.
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Old November 8, 2008, 06:41 AM   #36
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To address the initial question, I believe it is a 'gimmick' because of the extra cost, but not for the potential operational capabilities.
That actually makes good sense.

Me, I just figured Surefire started really hyping the strike bezel when it became apparent that their pre strike bezel claims of the light (brightness) being a weapon wasn't holding up too well in real life applications and after you had schools like Thunder Ranch (where I first heard this) noting during low light instruction that "A flashlight is not a death ray and should not be considered as a weapon. Bad guys don't stop their attack and grab their eyes just because you flashed them with a bright light as shown in the ads from certain companies." {paraphrased from memory}
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Old November 8, 2008, 10:34 AM   #37
JohnH1963
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If I was carrying around a flashlight in a parking lot with a sharp edge to it and its obvious design is not to just illuminate, can I get charged with some type of offense?

Im certain the police in my community wouldnt just let by any guy carrying a long mag light with a modified sharp edged bezel. At least, I hope they would give some scrutinity to some guy walking around the neighborhood with a tool like that...
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Old November 8, 2008, 10:40 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Double Naught Spy
Of course, I first need time to draw my strike bezel flashlight, properly apply it in order to draw my pistol...
Ever considered that you might have one hand tied up by your assailant and the other isn't able to draw your gun but you could your flashlight?
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Old November 8, 2008, 04:09 PM   #39
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I have both the E2D and E2E; as far as I can remember they were similarly priced. The advantage of the E2D is that it's less scary-looking and thus more likely to make it through Customs if you're in, say, Britain over the summer, as I was this year.

It never occurred to me to use the E2E as a striking weapon. I always figured it was more of a last-ditch way to get a person's hands off you. Try twisting it fairly lightly on the back of your hand (don't do it on your face, but imagine it). It hurts, doesn't it? Now think what you'd do with your hand if someone really cranked on it with the bezel. You'd probably let go of whatever you were holding.

I guess it does seem mostly like a gimmick, but if the price is the same and you don't need a non-scary flashlight, why not?
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Old November 8, 2008, 11:30 PM   #40
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Ever considered that you might have one hand tied up by your assailant and the other isn't able to draw your gun but you could your flashlight?
If I can draw my flashlight, then I can draw my CRKT knife or my BUG. All three are weak side carry. Of the three, the flashlight is the one I want least for fighting.
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Old November 9, 2008, 11:10 AM   #41
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My point is there may be a situation where the only available choice is to use what you have in hand or the only item you can reach.

Not everybody carries a BUG more less a primary gun. So, to say that whatever works for you doesn't necessarily mean it will work for others.
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Old November 9, 2008, 12:45 PM   #42
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Like I said in post#32, I guess having a pseudo sharper edge on everything I own is a good thing, ...

...but strike bezels aren't the amazing fighting tool the hype makes them out to be.
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Old November 9, 2008, 09:18 PM   #43
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If I have to resort to using my flashlight as a weapon things have gone very bad, I've been through my pistol and knife and I don't think I'll be cool-headed enough to remember to hit with the bezel. I'm going to be throwing wild punches & kicks or running.
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Old November 10, 2008, 02:04 PM   #44
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The emphasis on choosing to access a flashlight instead of other weapon options ignores that such tools are frequently already in hand and in use at the onset of hostilities; the primary purpose of the tool being to provide light, after all. And that at that point in time, given proximity and the urgency of the moment, the light in hand is ready for action, where the other options are not.

That and the easier access often afforded by light which do not require concealment or opening vs. other weapon/tool options which do; but that's subjective tot he given person with given tools.

Oh, and in my opinion, the greatest asset the crenelations provide is the protection they afford the lense. Two lenses later, I may have to upgrade for that reason alone.
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Old November 25, 2008, 09:42 AM   #45
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I think that most here are arguing the wrong point. We all mostly agree that a firearm is way better than a flashlight. As an airline pilot, I have never been stopped for having one of these in my flight kit. I guarantee you the folks at TSA will stop me for having a firearm in the airport.

These flashlights are effective as weapons when we are not allowed to have one and great as back ups when we are armed. It's just an extra tool and I believe that the more tools that we have available to us in a fight, the better we are prepared to survive the fight....

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Old November 25, 2008, 09:31 PM   #46
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These flashlights are effective as weapons when we are not allowed to have one and great as back ups when we are armed. It's just an extra tool and I believe that the more tools that we have available to us in a fight, the better we are prepared to survive the fight....
Okay, but would you rather have a nice big hefty mag light, or a tiny little light weight Surefire with a strike bezel with which to fight?
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Old November 26, 2008, 12:43 AM   #47
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I carry both. Options are a key element in survival.

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Old November 28, 2008, 06:36 AM   #48
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The maglite feels nice and hefty in the hand, but I find the handle insufficiently knurled to provide a secure one-handed grip. The bell end has no knurling whatsoever to grip, and my concern is that once blood starts to flow, a maglite will be nearly impossible to keep hold of. I much prefer a baton to a maglite for striking; though of course a baton has no ability to illuminate anything and requires an entirely separate course of action to bring to bear.
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Old November 28, 2008, 10:09 AM   #49
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Okay, but would you rather have a nice big hefty mag light, or a tiny little light weight Surefire with a strike bezel with which to fight?
That's an easy answer.

Would you rather CCW a .500 S&W that will blow the head off your assailant or CCW a tiny little XD/M&P/Glock.45ACP to fight?

Carrying a hefty Maglite around is obviously cumbersome and not user friendly. Hitting someone in the face with the weight your fist is damaging enough. The Surefire with a strike bezel would be similar to being hit with brass knuckles. On top of that, my strikes will be much, much quicker with the Surefire. Using a big hefty Mag light would provide 3 day's notice when and where it's coming from.

Care to guess how much extra in fees it is to be over weight with luggage these days? Or are you just going to carry it on your person and hope that the lady next to you is going to ask if that's a flashlight in your pocket?
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Old November 29, 2008, 12:16 PM   #50
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"Okay, but would you rather have a nice big hefty mag light, or a tiny little light weight Surefire with a strike bezel with which to fight?"

It is not about what you'd like; or we'd be talking shotguns and carbines. It is about what you'll have; a reasonably sized dual-use item which can be carried virtually everywhere by everyone.

I've got one in my pocket right now. It is always there.
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