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Old August 23, 2008, 06:50 AM   #1
copter_dad
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Ruger MKIII VQ accurizing kit

Is the Volquartsen accurizing kit for the MKIII truly a drop-in job?
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Old August 23, 2008, 03:02 PM   #2
Citizen Carrier
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Actually, I can help you out on this one!

I've done VQ parts on three Mk IIs and one Mk III.

The first one took me 45 minutes. By the time I did the last one, I was down to 15 minutes.

Yes, the parts are basically all drop in.

Now here's the thing about the Mk III kit.

You have a Mk III, but consider getting the Mk II kit.

If you get a Mk II kit and one of Clark's match tolerance hammer bushings, you can install it in the Mk III and eliminate that magazine safety.

You essentially turn the Mk III into a Mk II with a loaded chamber indicator.

Make sure in any case that you get the newer style trigger with the easily adjusted trigger overtravel stop. You have to disassemble the Mk III to get at the factory overtravel stop (yep, there's one in there!), but it is a PAIN to adjust.

The VQ trigger is much, much easier to adjust.

Okay, one IMPORTANT THING.

When you have the gun apart, the sliding trigger button is going to come out. Inside that safety is an EXTREMELY small spring-loaded detent. You must be careful or you will lose the detent and the spring and the safety just won't work if you try to re-install it without those parts.

I lost one of mine in the carpet and had to drag a magnet to find it.

Re-installing the safety is one of the more "tricky" aspects of the operation, but you get better at it each time.

The other tough part will be sliding the sear spring over the hole in the frame for it's pin. I used a pair of needle-nose pliers the first time, but in subsequent attempts I found I could slide it into place with just a finger.

You shouldn't have to stone, polish, or file any of these parts to get them installed.

Finally, I would consider NOT getting the lightweight match hammer. The standard factory one will do and I suppose there is a chance of light strikes or misfires with a lighter hammer.

Instead of getting the lightweight hammer, think instead about getting one of the VQ "exact edge" extractors. This usually fixes a problem I call "The Ruger Stovepipe", which some owners (me) experience.

If you find your pistol jams every now and then with a .22 cartridge sticking halfway out, wedged between the bolt and breech face...that is The Ruger Stovepipe.

Don't worry, it's easy to fix.
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Old August 23, 2008, 04:40 PM   #3
darkgael
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VQ drop in

Ditto that last post.
I did the kit with my MK.II. No problems at all. Everything dropped in. I took my time. Observe all the cautions already noted.
Pete
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Old August 23, 2008, 08:21 PM   #4
RPSmith
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Is the upgrade worth it?
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Old August 23, 2008, 08:22 PM   #5
copter_dad
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Thanks all! Where can I get individual parts rather than a complete kit?
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Old August 24, 2008, 02:57 AM   #6
Citizen Carrier
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I got all my parts from here:

http://www.rimfiresports.com/merchan...egory_Code=VC2

For some reason, it was always cheaper here than to go directly from Volquartsen. I think Midway and Brownells might carry these parts too.

What I'd get:

Volquartsen Ruger Mark II and 22/45 Target Sear (yeah, it says Mk II, but if you click on it, you'll see it also works in the Mk III.) This isn't too tough to install.

Volquartsen Exact Edge Extractor. It may eliminate the Ruger Stovepipe problem if you happen to experience it. If you find you are getting a lot of stovepipe jams, I know what is causing it. The extracted case is hitting the far side magazine lip (looking through the ejection port) before the case has a chance to hit the ejector. This causes the spent case to spin/tumble in the action and it gets wedged between the bolt and breech face before it can get thrown clear.

The Exact Edge might eliminate that or you might be lucky and not experiencing that jam at all.

The sure fix for that problem, in case anybody is interested, is this. First, determine that this is your problem.

With a magazine inserted, using either a spent case or VERY CAREFULLY, a live round, chamber the case. Now pull back on the bolt to extract it while watching through the ejection port. If you can see that the rim of the case is going to hit the magazine feed lip before it has a chance to hit the ejector, you're more likely to get the Ruger Stovepipe.

The fix is to put the magazine in a vice and either file or dremel that far side feed lip down until you can see that the rim of the case will hit the ejector rather than the feed lip. Don't worry, I've done a dozen magazines up like this for my Rugers and I never get the stovepipe.

Okay, back to the parts...

Volquartsen Ruger Mark II / III Adjustable Target Trigger. This is an outstanding trigger because it has both an overtravel stop and a pre-travel adjustment. You can take pretty much all the slop out of the trigger pull and tune it right to the point where it will break for the shot.

The VQ "Volthane" grips are very comfortable and I've owned a pair of them. I happen to like Herretts Stocks Ruger grip, which is wood and has an adjustable palm shelf. Buy it from anybody but Herretts directly and you'll probably get a better price.

The extended slide release is nice if you are using your Ruger in speed type matches like bowling pin shoots. If you aren't shooting in stuff like that, I wouldn't bother with it. Just pull the bolt back and chamber manually. Less parts wear that way...


Okay, here's the decision part.

The Mk III has extra little springs in the mechanism which make up the magazine safety disconnect. Meaning, you can't fire the gun unless there is a magazine in there depressing that spring.

I didn't like messing with that extra spring as it complicates putting in some of these parts, so I took it out and turned my Mk III into a Mk II.

Basically, this entails discarding the Mk III hammer and installing a Mk II hammer in it's place. You'll also need to either modify the hammer bushing by adding a thin washer to take up the space between the hammer and the slide release and trigger bar on that pin OR by ordering an oversized match Mk II hammer bushing from Clark Custom Guns.

The small washer is the easier fix. I found a small copper washer in the bolt bin in the motor pool. There were literally hundreds of them.

I think it makes the trigger pull even better and it enables the gun to function as a single shot if I don't happen to have magazines.

Something worth considering...
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Old August 24, 2008, 01:19 PM   #7
copter_dad
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Citizen Carrier, great posts!! Just what I was looking for. May have more questions in future. Thanks!!! copter_dad
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Old August 24, 2008, 03:26 PM   #8
Citizen Carrier
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Hey, no problem. I'll keep an eye out if you have more questions or you can send me a PM.

Like I said, I can install all of these parts with essentially no tools now. I use a rubber mallet to seperate the barrel/receiver from the grip frame.

Other than that, I use a couple of small allen wrenches to act as "pins" to hold parts in place until I'm ready to install the actual Ruger pins back in to fihish the job.

You shouldn't need anything more than that, really.

Well, you'll need a small flat head screwdriver. I mean a small one. Like those small screwdriver sets with the yellow handles they sell at Walmart. This is merely to press down a small spring that retains the trigger pin. Once that spring is pushed down, you can push the pin out with one of the allen wrenches. That should do it.
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Old August 24, 2008, 06:30 PM   #9
darkgael
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vq

"Is the upgrade worth it?"
I think so. The two failings that the Ruger MK.II has are it's grip angle and it's trigger. One can be addressed with grips. The VQ is a better trigger than stock. Having shot the original for a long time, as well as a Clark trigger, the difference with the VQ is immediate and positive.
Pete
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