The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Revolver Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 2, 2008, 09:58 AM   #1
bds32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 5, 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 481
Trigger Stops needed?

I noticed that my 627PC's have trigger stops just behind the trigger. I read an article by John Taffin in which he said that triggers stops are "not so good". Anyone know why these are on the gun? What do they add in performance? Are they prone to failure? Is removal in an option that will improve the reliability of the weapon?

Thanks.
bds32 is offline  
Old August 2, 2008, 01:37 PM   #2
MrBorland
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 1,815
Quote:
Anyone know why these are on the gun? What do they add in performance? Are they prone to failure? Is removal in an option that will improve the reliability of the weapon?
A properly adjusted trigger stop will "stop" the trigger from its rearward travel the instant the trigger breaks, so you get little or no "overtravel" of the trigger. Since the overtravel happens just when the trigger pull weight goes to zero, a trigger stop helps the gun from jarring and ruining your perfect sight picture the moment the gun fires.

Others with more expertise than me ought to chime in, but here's my take: On a DA/SA revolver, they are useful when shooting SA, since the hammer and trigger pull further back in SA than in DA. On a DA/SA revolver, then, the trigger stop is adjusted such that it only prevents single action overtravel, and therefore does nothing to improve DA function. Some of the older S&W target revolvers (e.g. K-22 Masterpiece) had internal trigger stops set for SA fire. This was back in the day when revolvers were still used in bullseye shooting, but were shot SA in competition. My guess is the stop on modern DA/SA revolvers like the 627 is set up like this, so if you don't mess with it, reliability ought not be a problem.

OTOH, on a revolver rendered DA only (DAO), I'm assuming the trigger stop can be adjusted to prevent DA overtravel. I'm planning on sending my S&W 686 to a gunsmith for some work, and at this point, I'm inclined to have a trigger stop installed, but only because I'll also have it rendered DAO.
MrBorland is offline  
Old August 2, 2008, 02:21 PM   #3
John Moses
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 9, 2008
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 161
Mr Boreland

Not wanting to hijack the thread, but why would you want to convert your revolver to DAO?
John Moses is offline  
Old August 2, 2008, 03:19 PM   #4
MrBorland
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 1,815
Several reasons. In the case of a defense revolver, there's a lot to be said for rendering a revolver DAO. I think Cunningham says it well (link below).

My 686 will be a range-only gun, and I'd like to start competing in local IDPA matches. I never shoot it SA and planned to have an action job anyway and rendering a revolver DAO gives the 'smith a little more leeway in tuning the DA trigger.

http://www.grantcunningham.com/blog_...e_for_dao.html
MrBorland is offline  
Old August 3, 2008, 09:15 AM   #5
John Moses
Junior member
 
Join Date: July 9, 2008
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 161
Gotcha

Thank you Mr. Boreland

While I never understood the concept of DAO handguns, as you will truly NEVER use it SA your application makes perfect sense.

For a defense weapon, especially with a pistol, I think that DAO is moronic. I can see the lawyers in a board room.

"we need to make all of the trigger pulls the same".

"I've got an idea! lets mess them ALL up. They will be identical"

"Outstanding! give that man some stock options"
John Moses is offline  
Old August 3, 2008, 01:36 PM   #6
bds32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 5, 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 481
Thanks for the explanation, it makes sense. John Taffin did not elaborate in his article why he didn't like trigger stops so I figured he experienced an associated problem.

My 627pc is a defense gun and that is why reliability is very important to me. I also like the ability to shoot single action with it. I like to zero the gun in single action from a rest at 25 yards. I also like to take long shots in single action.
bds32 is offline  
Old August 3, 2008, 02:08 PM   #7
CraigC
Junior member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2001
Location: West Tennessee
Posts: 4,300
I don't know which article you're referring to but he probably was referencing the setscrew type usually set in the trigger itself. Those screws 'can' turn themselves, tying up the gun at the most inopportune time. There are ways of limiting trigger overtravel without creating a reliability issue.
CraigC is offline  
Old August 3, 2008, 05:01 PM   #8
MrBorland
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 1,815
Quote:
Those screws 'can' turn themselves, tying up the gun at the most inopportune time.
I'd hope they'd come from the factory pre-set correctly with some kind of threadlocker in place to prevent this. If you start messing with it, though, all bets are off. I could imagine a scenario, for example, where someone starts messing with it and it ends up somehow getting set to just the exact wrong position such that the hammer manages to get cocked, but the trigger can't be pulled to release the hammer. Now you've got a cocked loaded gun stuck that way.

In my experience, the SA triggers on Smiths are pretty good to begin with, with little overtravel. I didn't read Taffin's article either, but it may be a case of just another "thing" that's really not needed.
MrBorland is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.07362 seconds with 7 queries