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Old May 4, 2008, 01:52 PM   #1
graham82
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Using velocity to help develope loads

I have been reloading for only about a year and have recently purcased a chronograph. I am starting to work up loads for my new .308 which has a 28" SS barrell and a 1 in 10 twist. I will start working up loads using 168 gr. and 175 gr. Sierra HPBT match bullets with IMR 4895.

My question is, how do you use velocity to help develope loads for your gun? I do understand the need to check consistantcy of your reloads.

But, is there a certain velocity I should try to acheive for my .308 mentioned above?
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Old May 4, 2008, 02:13 PM   #2
rwilson452
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All rifles being different it's hard to say but I would think your most accurate velocity would be in the 2600-2700 FPS range. what you can look for as you go up in charge is consistency. the other ting is as you approach the max load you will see the increase in velocity flatten out. in other word you add more powder and don't see an increase in velocity. it's time to stop.



Quote:
Using velocity to help develope loads
I have been reloading for only about a year and have recently purcased a chronograph. I am starting to work up loads for my new .308 which has a 28" SS barrell and a 1 in 10 twist. I will start working up loads using 168 gr. and 175 gr. Sierra HPBT match bullets with IMR 4895.

My question is, how do you use velocity to help develope loads for your gun? I do understand the need to check consistantcy of your reloads.

But, is there a certain velocity I should try to acheive for my .308 mentioned above?
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Old May 4, 2008, 02:54 PM   #3
graham82
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Thanks for the reply.

Is there a method that can be used to determine what velocity range should be normally more accurate for different calibers using a certain bullet weight? I understand many things would need to be considered such as barrell length, bullet weight, temperature etc....

I was just thinking that now that I have a chronograph that I might be able to use it to my advantage in building up to an accurate load.
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Old May 4, 2008, 07:28 PM   #4
rwilson452
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Not really, it's another aid. it can help you determine the cause of fliers from your group. if the velocity is consistent but you have a flier it's likely you. on the other hand if the velocity is off, it's the load.


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Is there a method that can be used to determine what velocity range should be normally more accurate for different calibers using a certain bullet weight? I understand many things would need to be considered such as barrell length, bullet weight, temperature etc....
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Old May 5, 2008, 11:16 AM   #5
graham82
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As always someone is here with helpful answers. Thanks for the help!
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Old May 5, 2008, 11:31 AM   #6
wncchester
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"...Is there a method that can be used to determine what velocity range should be normally more accurate.."

No.

I develop my loads first, then check the velocity. If it's not satisfactory, I'll try again with another powder.
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Old May 5, 2008, 02:01 PM   #7
Inspector3711
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Another point... Very useful to know the velocity of the final load you choose so you can identify exactly where the bullet trajectory is. 200 fps makes a difference...
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