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Old March 24, 2008, 07:30 PM   #1
SavageMOA
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Compensating for .223 bullet drop

I'm getting into longer range shooting (300-500 yds). I'm wondering what the best way to compensate for bullet drop at these ranges would be? Maybe buying a mildot scope and learning the calculations associated with it? Any suggestions are welcome!
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Old March 24, 2008, 08:50 PM   #2
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just move you point of aim up.
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Old March 24, 2008, 08:52 PM   #3
SavageMOA
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but will that be effective? I mean for making precise long range shots
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Old March 24, 2008, 09:41 PM   #4
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I wonder what they did in the old days before optics.
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Old March 24, 2008, 10:01 PM   #5
ISC
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what kind of rifle? If It's an AR 15 with A2 sights you just dial in the range adjustment and shoot.

otherwise use the chart below and adjust point of aim.



20 inch barrel:


14.5 inch barrel:


All of the above information was for military 62 grain ammo. If you are shooting varmint bullets the compensation would be different.
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Old March 24, 2008, 11:14 PM   #6
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use a scope with turrets. Record the settings for differant ranges.
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Old March 25, 2008, 12:45 AM   #7
.351winchester
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If you are getting into long range shooting, better off getting a .308. Many scopes are available with built in BDC's. .223's have no business going past 300 yards, there's just no power to buck wind. The .308 is well at home in the range you stated, and beyond. There are cartridges with far better S/D and B/C (in this regard, the .260 beats the .308, even the 6.5 Grendel does; In something slightly heavier, 7mm Mag might make a good choice between .30-06 and .300 Win Mag, has a longer barrel life and less punshing recoil than a .300). All in all .308 is what you should be using for this type of shooting. I would for the first time really like to learn how to shoot a rifle 500 yards myself. I was/am interested in Savage's Scout, but for long range, have been looking at some of their other models, and researching optics. Savage looks to be the best bargain, quality but reasonable prices, everything cool but the finish.
I have seen BDC/.223 on inexpensive scopes in the Sportsman's Guide. I think there are too many variables to count on such a thing in this cal. I believe Some allow calibration to the load, not sure if the .223 models do this. You can shoot 300-500 with the heavy bullets but I think you'd be better off with the .308.
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Old March 25, 2008, 07:29 AM   #8
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Quote:
If you are getting into long range shooting, better off getting a .308. Many scopes are available with built in BDC's. .223's have no business going past 300 yards, there's just no power to buck wind.

Methinks there are a great number of service rifle competitors who would disagree with you there. Service rifle matches are shot out to 600, and the AR15 in .223 dominates. The high-BC .223 match bullets perform much better at long range than you suggest; if .223 really had "no power to buck wind", The top service rifle shooters would still be using .308 M14s.
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Old March 25, 2008, 09:04 AM   #9
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themanhimself:
Are you suggesting the .223 is as good or better than the .308 at 600 yds? If so, you better brush-up on the subject!
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Old March 25, 2008, 09:30 AM   #10
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Quote:
Are you suggesting the .223 is as good or better than the .308 at 600 yds? If so, you better brush-up on the subject!
For SERVICE RIFLE COMPETITION (as clearly stated twice by TMH), yes. It's been that way for over 10 years now.
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Old March 25, 2008, 04:29 PM   #11
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I'm shooting a Savage 12FV with 68-69 gr. bullets. I KNOW it's capable of 300-500 yd shots. I'm just trying to figure out the best way to compensate for bullet drop. I know that a .308 would be better but I can't afford another gun, nor the ammuntion to feed a .308. But i'm going to do what I can with what i have. My question still stands for the best method for compensation.
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Old March 25, 2008, 04:42 PM   #12
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Mildot scopes work if you know how to use them, there are scopes out there with ballistic plex or varmint hunters reticles that help compensate for ranges at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 yds for example. The .223 WILL shoot out to those ranges, I don't know your budget, but something like a Leupold VX-L with a varmint hunters reticle is pretty nice, I have them on both my .223 and one of my .220 swifts and love the scopes.
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Old March 25, 2008, 05:08 PM   #13
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go over to http://www.thehighroad.org. Look at the "stickies" in the rifle forum. There are three different segments on long range shooting.
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Old March 25, 2008, 06:04 PM   #14
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Quote:
Are you suggesting the .223 is as good or better than the .308 at 600 yds? If so, you better brush-up on the subject!
Not all around superior, no, but better for some purposes (service rifle) and adequate for many others. Comments like ".223's have no business going past 300 yards" really annoy me. Yes, the main hunting use of the .223 cartridge is as a varmint round, but the use of the cartridge in service rifle competition and as a military round shows that with the proper bullet selection it is good enough for distance shooting when .308 isn't available or practical (recoil/weight). Those little bullets don't just disappear at the 300 yard line. The Army states that the maximum effective range of the M16A2 rifle is 600 meters, and American servicemen have made plenty of kills at that distance and beyond. And I guess somebody needs to tell the Marines who qualify with their rifles (with ironsights, to boot) out to 500 yards that they can't do it with those .223 M16s.
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Old March 25, 2008, 09:20 PM   #15
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Amen to that! No question that the venerable .308 is superior in many aspects but there are several F-class competetors who shoot a .223 round accurately to 1000 yds. I saw a comparison where using computer software to simulate wind and ballistics the .308 only beat the .223 by about a 1/4" at 1000 yds. So as I said before, I'll do what I can with what I got.
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Old March 25, 2008, 10:17 PM   #16
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If it's past 300 yards... get closer.
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Old March 26, 2008, 02:10 AM   #17
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I agree with Deaf Smith, Move closer. I have read (and that does not mean much) that 223 rounds with a heavier bullet was being successfully used for some long distance shooting. The bullet was actually being seated down into the case a ways and the article said that it had improved characteristics in the wind. Problem is I cannot remember where I read it at.
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Old March 26, 2008, 11:33 AM   #18
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article | Practical Long-Range Rifle Shooting, Part II - Optics
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Old March 31, 2008, 02:53 PM   #19
SavageMOA
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How many MOA will I need to adjust up to compensate for the bullet drop on a .223 at 300, 400, 500 yards?

My scope has 1/4 MOA clicks.
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Old March 31, 2008, 02:54 PM   #20
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http://www.eskimo.com/~jbm/calculations/traj/traj.html
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Old March 31, 2008, 03:42 PM   #21
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Guess what US service rifle wins the 1,000 yard nationals every year?

The AR with the .223 round.

The AR in .223 has ruled the service rifle highpower line now for years.

They are capable of holding the X ring on the 600 yard target if the shooter is good enough.
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Old April 1, 2008, 07:15 PM   #22
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Thanks Zak for that site. That is an incredible setup they have there.
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