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Old February 11, 2008, 06:37 PM   #1
Charley345
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Barrel twist in my 243?

Have a Remington model 788 from 1978 give or take a year. The barrel is 22" from the tip of the gun to where it contacts the bolt face. So what would the twist be? Also want to know how light of bullets would work in this gun for long range prairie dog shooting.

Been lurking around here for a couple weeks soaking up as much info as I can, if my brain wasn't such a sieve I think I'd be genius with all the great info found here. Thanks to everyone!

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Old February 11, 2008, 08:08 PM   #2
Buzzcook
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I don't know the twist on the 788. I'd guess 12-1 though.
Anything from 60 to 80grain should do great.
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Old February 11, 2008, 08:12 PM   #3
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I would say 10-1
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Old February 11, 2008, 08:30 PM   #4
Mal H
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I would say check it yourself. Twist rates can vary even in the same model and same caliber, and barrel length has zip to do with twist rate.

To find the twist rate, pull or push a cleaning rod with a tight cleaning patch in the barrel. Either add a tape flag to the rod or make a mark on the rod. Stop pushing the rod when the tape or mark is straight up. Put a yardstick next to the rod with the end at the mark. Start pulling the rod again until the tape or mark has made one complete revolution and note the number of inches the rod traveled. That is your twist rate. For example, if the rod turned one revolution in 12", you have a 1:12 twist rate.
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Old February 11, 2008, 09:40 PM   #5
Full-choke
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243 the middle road is a 1 in 10" twist. That is best for 75-85 grainer, 1 in 12" is good for the 60-70 grain range while 1 in 8" is good for the 90-110 grain range. Just remember, it is better to have too fast of a twist then too slow. I am setting up a 6mm Remington Encore and I had my barrel done in 1 in 10" so that I can shoot good 300 yard coyote loads on down to accurate groundhog and coon rounds.

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Old February 11, 2008, 09:58 PM   #6
Charley345
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Thanks all,
Per Mal H's instructions I checked and it is 1:10 twist. So I should be able to work up a good load with the 70 and 85 gr. bullets I have on hand. Thanks again, this is a great forum.
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Old February 12, 2008, 07:31 PM   #7
MADISON
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.243 Twist

I can not tell what weight bullet to use but, here is how to find the twist:

Start a tight patch; being sure the jag is tight on the rod.
Mark the rod with a felt tip to indicate Top Dead Center and a starting point.
Advance the rod until it comes back to Top Dead Center.
Measure the distance traveled from the start mark. That is the rifling twist, one turn in xx inches.
A lot easier than trying to estimate the amount of twist in a foot.
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Old February 13, 2008, 09:23 AM   #8
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Think that your rifle has a 1 in 10" twist rate. From the outset the .243 took off because it would handle 100 grain bullets for deer hunting. The .244 Remington was a dismal failure because Remington wrongly assumed that their gun would be used exclusively for varmints: They gave it a 1 in 12" twist rate. That cartridge in that rifle would not handle 100 grain bullets.

After many years Remington re-named the .244. They called it the 6mm Remington and gave it a 1 in 9" twist rate. But it was too late for Remington.


For many years I had a Remington model 788 in .243. Your gun will handle most 100 grain bullets. Some of the new long for caliber bullets may not be stabilized in your gun.
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