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Old May 17, 2008, 09:54 PM   #151
IronsMan
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Thanks kamerer!

What would one of these in excellent to like new condition be worth? Is being older worth anything?
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Old May 18, 2008, 09:16 PM   #152
Erik F
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I acquired a S&W 67 today. It's a no-dash model, with the original stainless rear sights. Serial # sequence is 5K96XXX.

It looks as if it was fired and left in storage for quite some time without being cleaned. I've literally been peeling lead off it in spots. I gave very little for it, since the original owner didn't seem to care for it to any extent further than paying a few bills.

I should be able to bring it back to 90% or so, thankfully. Function was my main concern, and this gun looks to be the product of neglect rather than abuse. She'll be a shooter, anyhow.

Don't care what it's "worth," but if someone could let me know roughly when it might have been manufactured, I'd be much obliged!
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Old May 18, 2008, 10:57 PM   #153
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38 S.&w Special Ctg

Can I have some help identifying this revolver? My grandfather gave it to me today, and I'm not very knowledgeable about guns in general. I've read quite a bit trying to identify it myself, but have not really been able to pin it down.

There is no model number when you slide open the cylinder, only an assembly number.

Serial Number: 630XXX

The finish is a darkish color... almost like dark tinted car windows.

I'm pretty sure it is a K frame from the stuff I have read.

Square butt.

5 screws (including the trigger guard screw and 1 under the grip).

The grip is wood with a diamond around the screw, and there's a silver S/W logo near the top.

There is no insignia above the grip on the right side of the gun, but there is a trademark S/W insignia on the left side above the grip.

5 inch barrel.

The top of the barrell has a patent inscription that says:
SMITH & WESSON SPRINGFIELD MASS. U.S.A
PATENTED FEB.6.06,SEPT.14.09,DEC.29.14

Any info would be greatly appreciated!!!
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Old May 20, 2008, 04:59 AM   #154
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Ironsman - I'd guess one in that nice a shape should be worth $400 +/- a little bit. Sounds nice.

Erik - that dates to 1974. You can bring a SS gun back from any almost any condition, and restoring grips isn't hard, too, if they are intact and not gouged and chipped up.

calavera - sounds like a late '30s Military & Police model. A picture helps a lot if you can post one (use photobucket to host if you need to). Grips should be 1/2 round at the top, silver medallions inset into the 1/2 rounded area?
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Old May 20, 2008, 09:15 AM   #155
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Quote:
calavera - sounds like a late '30s Military & Police model. A picture helps a lot if you can post one (use photobucket to host if you need to). Grips should be 1/2 round at the top, silver medallions inset into the 1/2 rounded area?
You should get a letter for this one. S&W handgun sales tanked during the Depression and they were able to produce several years' worth of M&Ps using frames they stockpiled during the 20s, but they did not pay attention to the serial numbers on the frames they were using, so the guns were not built in numerical order.

FWIW if you choose to shoot this one, don't feed it any ammo labeled "+P" or "+P+". This is higher-pressure ammo than normal .38 Special. Unlike postwar S&W products, these older guns were not made to withstand the higher pressure, and using +P ammo can blow them up.
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Old May 20, 2008, 02:27 PM   #156
calavera
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Thank you kamerer and carguychris! I was pretty sure it was an M&P pre war, so it's good to hear someone confirm it. I'm charging the camera battery now and I'll post a picture later today!
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Old May 22, 2008, 07:23 AM   #157
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Can someone help me on my S&W?
It's a model 10-7
s/n 3D574XX
Thanks

Last edited by cantusemynormaluser; May 22, 2008 at 07:50 AM. Reason: serial number was complete
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Old May 22, 2008, 11:42 PM   #158
kamerer
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Quote:
It's a model 10-7
s/n 3D574XX
Think of it this way: sometime during the Iranian Hostage Crisis and second oil shock, 1978-79.
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Old May 23, 2008, 12:58 AM   #159
Rich Miranda
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Quote:
The Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson
Does this contain a lot of high-quality pictures?

I would like to buy a nice S&W revolver, but I really don't know much about them. I could use the catalog as a buying guide (or a catalog, HA!).
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Old May 23, 2008, 02:00 AM   #160
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It is MASSIVELY and beautifully filled with photos. There is at least one photo per model, and usually more (or a few in one photo) since most models had different variants (barrels, grips, finishes, etc.) It is also a real bargain at Amazon.com and the like for what it is. I highly recommend it. It has the S/N codes in an appendix in the back, sections on all models up to 2005/6 - the last edition date (the current edition is #3, from 2006).
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Old May 23, 2008, 08:29 AM   #161
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+1 on the SCSW; for the best photos, make sure you get the 3rd edition, the one currently in print. Supposedly one of the main changes in comparison to the previous editions is an increased number of color photos. There are several color photos on almost every page.

Regarding using at as a buyer's guide, the only problem is that the book is SO comprehensive that it can cause information overload. It's also a little too big to lug to the gun store or gun show. Maybe Supica and Nahas could produce an abridged pocket edition.
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Old May 24, 2008, 12:32 PM   #162
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S&W 36 Date of Manufacture

Ok, here's one I just picked up. Smith and Wesson Model 36 (no dash) with adjustable sights with Serial # 391XXX. Help dating the gun would be appreciated.
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Old May 26, 2008, 03:36 PM   #163
mward58
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Wylie,
1976/77
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Old May 26, 2008, 06:29 PM   #164
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Quote:
Wylie,
1976/77
Only if it had a "J" prefix. (ie J391xxx).
Without the prefix it's 1962 - 1969.

Jim
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Old May 26, 2008, 07:08 PM   #165
mward58
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Laytonj1,

Sorry my mistake. Looked it up wrong in Standard Catalog.
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Old May 27, 2008, 10:03 AM   #166
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Old NYPD pistol

Was my dad's - serial number 55XXX - believe it is a model 10?? He was a cop in the 50-80's...

Thanks!
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Old May 27, 2008, 11:08 AM   #167
carguychris
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Was my dad's - serial number 55XXX - believe it is a model 10?? He was a cop in the 50-80's...
What's the caliber and, if you know it, the frame size?

If in doubt about the caliber, please transcribe the barrel inscription exactly as it appears. Some of the older inscriptions can be confusing in relation to modern terminology. If there are any other inscriptions on the barrel, those are helpful too. Also, if in doubt about the frame size, tell us the number of rounds it holds.
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Old May 27, 2008, 12:55 PM   #168
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38 Spl and appears to be a K - my old 66 grips fit perfectly

Thanks again
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Old May 28, 2008, 05:22 PM   #169
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if not a K, what else might it be? was used by NYPD....just found out my dad's off-duty Colt was made in 1928, obviously he bought it used, since he was born in 1925.....

any help is appreciated....
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Old May 29, 2008, 12:05 AM   #170
carguychris
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Was my dad's - serial number 55XXX - believe it is a model 10?? He was a cop in the 50-80's...
If it's a K-frame, it's a .38 Military & Police Model of 1902 1st Change, built 1903-1904. This will be a round-butt gun with a 4-screw frame; it actually predates the well-known 5-screw frame. It will have a very thin round blade front sight, an unshrouded ejector rod, and a barrel inscription that reads ".38 S&W SPECIAL CTG. & U.S. SERVICE CTG.", the second referring to the .38 Long Colt.

Given the dates of your father's police service, IMHO the gun is more likely to be a .38/44 Heavy Duty. This is an N-frame (large) square-butt gun with a shrouded ejector rod, fixed sights, and a barrel inscription that reads ".38 S&W SPECIAL CTG." This gun was chambered for a cartridge called the .38/44 S&W Special aka .38 Special High Velocity, which was an early response by S&W to the perceived inadequacy of the .38Spl as a defensive round; it's essentially the equivalent of a modern .38Spl+P and a predecessor to the .357 Magnum. .38/44 HDs were sold to a number of law enforcement agencies. The serial number puts it in the 1930-1941 range, but as with other Depression-era S&Ws, you need to get it lettered to get a precise date.
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Old May 29, 2008, 03:45 AM   #171
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Yo - Oneounceload - I'm here to support Carguychris:

The thing he didn't mention, is that until 1980, S&W used the same number runs on different guns. If it was a different caliber, or frame size, it could have the same s/n. So he's not being a doof when he asks about size, pics, etc. to ID the gun. It's really that complicated with S&W's. If you can just get a pic of the gun, both sides, and as many as possible, and the number, that will help. Also, there were letter prefixes that dictated the S/N - but not right in front of them. The "S" or "C" or other might be a few spaces in front of the number.

Hope this helps; S&W IDs take some effort. Carguychris isn't string you out, just trying to be correct.
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Old May 29, 2008, 06:51 AM   #172
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here's some pics - when putting the original grips back on for these, I noticed two more sets of numbers - one on the bottom of the grips, and one on the backstrap - I am assuming the backstrap is NYPD' number - could the ones on the bottom be the actual serial number?, and if so, what is the number I gave previously from the crane?

Thanks again, and I apologize in advance if these are too big



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Old May 29, 2008, 06:56 AM   #173
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OOPs - guess I should have put that number from the bottom of the grip: C 132XXX; the right side has 3 screws visible on the side plate and one on the front of the trigger guard, marked "38 S&W Special CTG"; left side just has the "Smith & Wesson".

Thanks!
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Old May 29, 2008, 08:22 AM   #174
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The number inside the crane is the assembly number, which is arbitrary; refer to the discussion earlier in this thread.

The definitive place for the serial number on a S&W is either the bottom of the grip frame or the frontstrap, whichever is present. S&W also stamped the serial number in other places on some older models (such as under the extractor star or inside the yoke), but this varies from model to model.

Your father's gun is a .38 Military & Police "Pre Model 10" made in the late 40s to mid 50s. It has the 5-screw frame; the 5th screw is under the stocks. The "C" prefix denotes the 3rd millionth series of .38 M&P production. I don't have my SCSW handy, so I'll have to look up a more precise year of production later, if someone else doesn't chime in first.
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Old May 29, 2008, 01:52 PM   #175
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Chris won't find a better date in the SCSW, but we can narrow it a little bit. The defining features are the "short action" hammer and "C" prefix s/n (post spring 1948) and the stocks (grips - "stocks" in S&W speak). They are the lovely "high shoulder" type that ended in 1952. "C" started in spring '48, and ended at a million in '68. But they hit the 250,000 number in 1953 (they were making up for war-time shortages and the post-war boom in those years). Assuming even production ( a big assumption, mind you), that should be about alate 1950 or early 1951. The only way to be more precise is to get a "factory letter" from S&W's in-house historian. A super-bargain at $35. Since it's your dad's gun, and he's likely the original owner, that would be worth doing.

It's in great shape for a police gun - maybe 80/85% w/o any pitting and grips in like condition. "By the book" it's likely a $250 or $300 gun tops, but the NYPD history should add value to it. I now you likely aren't shopping it around, but thought I'd throw that in. Get the factory letter so you can hand it down to someone with the document and all original. Very neat!
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