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Old January 12, 2008, 08:57 AM   #1
JBB
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Cylinder Pin Lube

What's the best lube to use on the cylinder pin of my "58 Remington replica? I've tried bore butter and ballistol, but the action starts to stiffen up after 3 or 4 cylinders of shooting. I'm using 30gr of Pyrodex, a wonder wad, and a 454 ball. I love the gun, but am I going to have to clean and lube it every few cylinders. I can't imagine a soldier using one in battle having that luxury.
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Old January 12, 2008, 09:56 AM   #2
DrLaw
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I was going to answer here, but I forgot the name of the stuff that I use.

In the meantime, that is one of the things that we live with when shooting b-p guns. Generally, it is the stuff that on the front of the cylinder that - Tetra Gun Grease, that's it - stops the shooting. There is a limited gap between barrel and cylinder face that usually gets gummed up by the b-p residue, but that residue gets everywhere.

Bore Butter in the cylinder above the bullet usually helps to keep the residue from caking hard, and keeps it semi-soft enough to move like a sludge and will extend shooting. Bore butter on the cylinder pin though, I don't think is that good an idea. Bore butter will melt, Tetra won't melt as fast.

In war situations, the fellows that had pistols usually had swords or knives. Regular soldiers may have had pistols, but the primary weapon was the rifle or bayonet, as both made handy weapons, loaded gun or not. Reloading was probably not an option close-up when pistols were used. When you think about how long it takes to reload your gun at the range, think of how it would be when somebody was trying to kill you up close and personal.

No 'King's-X' or 'time-out' there. They probably got their 5 or 6 shots and then holstered the pistol and used something else.

Anyway, that's my take on it.

The Doc is out now.
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Old January 12, 2008, 09:59 AM   #3
Hawg
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You're right on the money with 3-4 cylinders with a 58 Remmy. You're not going to get much better. Revolvers weren't used that much in battle. Most were used by Cavalry and southerners in particular carried 4-6 revolvers on average. Fired them till empty and discarded them hopefully to recover them later. You might get another cylinder or two by spraying Balistol on the cylinder face but you really need to remove the cylinder and clean the fouling off the pin and relube it. Once it starts to bind don't try to force turn it with the hammer.
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Old January 12, 2008, 07:55 PM   #4
PitBull
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For the '58 Remington base pin I found that the M1 (or M14) rifle grease that comes in the very small plastic containers with yellow lids works great. I think it's called Lubriplate 130. Grease that base pin up with that and it won't bind up for a long time. I tried all kinds of lubes before that and nothing else worked nearly as well.
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Old January 12, 2008, 10:43 PM   #5
Hawg
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Quote:
For the '58 Remington base pin I found that the M1 (or M14) rifle grease that comes in the very small plastic containers with yellow lids works great. I think it's called Lubriplate 130. Grease that base pin up with that and it won't bind up for a long time. I tried all kinds of lubes before that and nothing else worked nearly as well.
If you get it in the chambers or bore cleanup is going to be a chore. I only use vegetable based lubes where I get fouling.
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Old January 13, 2008, 02:15 AM   #6
marcseatac
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I started out with Cabelas ML lube on my cylinder pins, Remys and Colts. I can shoot for hours with not a single problem with rotation of the cylinder. It's a white lube reminds me of crisco and wax and it's easy to clean and keeps it's lube properties for long term storage. It's a heavy thick lube and stays in the arbor grooves on my Walker and Dragoon.

It works so well I've never thought about using anything else.
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Old January 13, 2008, 07:00 AM   #7
Hawg
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I'll have to try that. Thanks for the post.
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Old January 13, 2008, 01:36 PM   #8
Fred_Fred
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I use wonder wads with my '58 and about every two or three cylinders full, I pull the pin and wipe it off with a wad. It cleans and lubes at the same time. I don't waste the wad either and go ahead and shoot it.
Cheers.
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