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Old December 5, 2007, 10:41 PM   #1
Rugerrat
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Range reloading setup

Does anyone have a portable reloading setup that they transport to the range that they would be willing to share pictures or description of? I am looking for neat way to transport necessary reloading supplies for load workup.
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Old December 6, 2007, 04:13 PM   #2
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Lee Reloader?
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Old December 6, 2007, 05:37 PM   #3
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The biggest problem i had in the field during workup sessions was accuracy of the powder charging due to wind/breeze.

I would simply c-clamp my press/powder measure to the bench. All of the case prep was done in advance of going to the range.

For the powder scale, I made a 12"X14" wooden box, 6" in front and 12" in the back, with a slanted top covered with plexiglass, hinged so it opened and closed easily. I cut a small hand hole in the front and trickeled powder into the pan in the windless box.
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Old December 6, 2007, 06:47 PM   #4
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I had a buddy that had an older Dillon 550 that he bolted to a
2" X 18" plank / so he could transport it. He carried it in the back of his van - and he'd fill the powder dispenser and set it up in his van and then adjust his loads a little and work thru his loads that way at the range. Sorry no photos of it .....

He left the loader on the same plank all the time - and he had some heavy bolts with wing nuts and he would bolt it down to his workbench at home and run his volume loads then ( after he worked out the plus and minus issues at the range ). It wasn't fancy but it worked.
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Old December 7, 2007, 01:55 AM   #5
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A friend of mine had an old wooden military ammo crate that he carried his press and reloading equipment in when we went varminting. It had screw-adjustable legs on one end and threaded inserts on the other end for mounting the press. At the end of the day, he would stand the crate on end using the top as a brace and resize and load all the ammo he had fired that day while we ate dinner and talked. Worked very well.
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Old December 7, 2007, 12:50 PM   #6
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This is a neat setup.

http://accurateshooter.wordpress.com...ch-free-plans/
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Old December 7, 2007, 05:47 PM   #7
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These folks are the recoginized experts in that particular area.

http://www.harrellsprec.com/online_store.html
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Old December 7, 2007, 06:22 PM   #8
Shoney
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I find it interesting that the responses are:
I had a buddy that---
A friend of mine had---
This is a neat setup---
These folks are the recoginized experts---


After having struggled with the problem for years, it's obvious to me that none of these posters have actually done it. The problem is weighing charges accurately. Physically sizing and loading the brass in a press in the field is not a problem.

The Harrell powder measures are the finest there are, bench rest shooter use them by throwing charges by volume only. However, when you field work up loads in 0.1 to 0.3 grain increments, you need a beam scale. Slight breezes will raise havoc with beam scales, and electronic scales go nuts when combining the unstable base of a workmate and blowing wind. Been there, done that!

You simply need to either wait for "the perfectwindless day" or build a windless box for use with a beam scale.
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Old December 7, 2007, 06:42 PM   #9
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Shoney is right - a breeze can be a problem on electronic scales - but it isn't that big a deal on a beam scale.

note: the reason I never went to the trouble of having a field setup is because I don't want to. I'd rather load 5 rounds at X grains, 5 rounds at Y grains, 5 rounds at Z grains and just go test them. Same thing on pistols - I load a variety of cartridges - then just go test them. But it doesn't mean I haven't seen one work.
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Old December 7, 2007, 07:08 PM   #10
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BigJimP I used to do the same as you , and there is nothing wrong with that. But I also like to spend the day at the range, not only working up powder charges, but once the best charge is achieved, start playing with length, primers, bullet model & mfg.

It is a PITA to spend several sessions adjusting and dialing in a load, when I can do it all in one (some times more) session(s). Otherwise, it could carry over to months of work, and targets and info can get blurred or lost. Even though I log almost all sessions, ideas and trends are easier to remember and play with at the same session.

I also like to load in the temperature range I will be hunting. Cold weather is a problem and time is limited, so the one day approach is almost manditory.

I have hunted in sub zero (-30 to -40) conditions, but have never had the good fourtune of bench work in those conditions.

Good Shooting!
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Old December 7, 2007, 07:10 PM   #11
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x2 for loading up a bunch of different loads before going to the range. Just make sure you mark each load, and that you don't loose the little slips of paper you've got your load notes on

A stiff breeze will throw off a beam scale, as well. A beam scale is no less accurate than a digital scale, and is just as susceptible to wind/surface movements as the digital.

I can only imagine trying to keep your charge consistent on the range, as I know the tables at all of our local ranges are flimsy, wobbly and would be very detrimental to getting an accurate zero on the scale.
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Old December 7, 2007, 07:41 PM   #12
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Shoney, I agree it can be a hassle to go back and forth to the range / in the same weather you'll be hunting in ....I understand balistically why you'd want to do that but that's way too tough on my body...so another reason I just never played with my loads at the range vs the comfort of my shop. You're a better man than I am to sit out there in -30 degree weather and play with a reloader ......or even at + 30 for that matter....just not as obsessed I guess, about that stuff as I used to be.

Screwball I agree a digital scale is no more accurate than a beam scale - but I find the digital scale is way more sensitive to air currents even inside my shop. Just opening the door of my shop causes a problem on my digital scale - and it has to be reset often - where most beam scales just aren't affected by little bit of air movement. Using a scale in the wind - you're right, that just will not work.
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Old December 7, 2007, 09:10 PM   #13
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Thanks to everyone for their response.

I may not have been clear about what I am looking for. I am already aware of the issues with range reloading and what equipment is available. Like a lot of reloaders, I am somewhat of a craftsman and very much a gadget guy.

I am looking to steal someones idea for creating a self-contained portable reloading kit that could be easily transported from shop to range with everything needed to work up some loads.
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Old December 7, 2007, 09:17 PM   #14
Rugerrat
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Additional thoughts

Part of the enjoyment of this hobby has been in creating my reloading bench and neatly organizing my equipment. I do really enjoy the posts with pictures of reloading work areas.
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Old December 7, 2007, 11:53 PM   #15
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Shoney,

You are right about the wind issue on range reloading.

There are digital scales with wind rings though. All of the current powder despenser/scale combinations have them. That little plastic cover over the scale pan is a wind ring. Drop it down and hit the despense button. No wind problem. Power, use an inverter off your car battery. No power gremlins then. So combine the wind ring idea with the high sides and and over hang of the workmate bench even a hefty gust shouldn't be an issue.
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Old December 9, 2007, 02:47 PM   #16
Shoney
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BigJimP thanks for the kind words but I'm no superman, I have not loaded at -30.
Quote:
I have hunted in sub zero (-30 to -40) conditions, but have never had the good fourtune of bench work in those conditions.
I have many hours at +10 to +20, and also have lots of hours at 80 to 90 degrees for working up varmint loads for the pervasively purulent pusillanimous prairie poodle.
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