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Old December 4, 2007, 08:28 PM   #1
Reaperatm
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Single Stage VS two Stage trigger?

Whats the difference? why would i want one over the other? I'm looling at a new trigger for my AK, this is why i ask, i know nothing about triggers. Thanks guys!
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Old December 4, 2007, 08:35 PM   #2
RockyMtnTactical
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Two stage triggers are smoother and should help make you more accurate with the weapon.
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Old December 4, 2007, 10:02 PM   #3
Malexander
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I have a two stage trigger on the Anschutz Model 1907 I shoot at the University club.



The two stage trigger enables you to achieve a very high degree of accuracy because you can take up all the slack without worrying about accidentally firing and you can set your trigger pull weight very very low. One of the shooters at the club has his trigger set to around 50g - around 1.1lbs. He routinely shoot 10 round groups less than 0.3" in diameter at 25 yards with aperture sights.

I tend to follow this pattern of shooting when using a two stage:

1. Exhale slowly
2. Watch the sights align on the target
3. Close eyes, inhale
4. Exhale, open eyes, hold on target
5. Place finger on trigger, take up first stage
6. Close eyes, inhale
7. Open eyes, exhale, fix sights on target
8. Squeeze trigger

It's slow, but very accurate and since the competitions I shoot only require you to shoot 10 rounds in 10 minutes you can afford to take your time.
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Old December 4, 2007, 10:32 PM   #4
homefires
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Are you all talking about a set trigger?
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Old December 5, 2007, 10:42 PM   #5
Reaperatm
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What is a set trigger?
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Old December 5, 2007, 11:33 PM   #6
DnPRK
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http://www.fulton-armory.com/2stage.htm

Set triggers provide a very light finger pressure, usually a few ounces of pull weight. They are typically used for precision shooting competition from a bench. The trigger is "set" by pushing it forward to engage a light sear notch (single set trigger) or by pulling a second trigger to "set" the primary trigger (double set triggers). A set trigger is not best for hunting or casual shooting because it can result in accidental firearm discharge.

Here is the best AK trigger on the market.
http://www.redstararms.com/index.htm?488.htm&1
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Old December 6, 2007, 07:08 PM   #7
Alleykat
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Quote:
Two stage triggers are smoother and should help make you more accurate with the weapon.
I'd like to see a two-stage trigger that's smoother and will let me be more accurate than the JP trigger in my AR!
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Old December 6, 2007, 07:32 PM   #8
hodaka
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Whatever you do, don't put a Jewel trigger in that AR. You will then need $200 for every AR you ever buy because that is what they cost. The JP doesn't come close. Been there. The Jewel is two stage, meaning like most military rifles, a short take up before the trigger becomes firm, then the actual trigger pull. With the Jewell you can adjust both stages.
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Old December 7, 2007, 09:36 AM   #9
Art Eatman
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I started out with a military two-stage on an old 1917 Enfield. Didn't have any trouble getting used to it. I then converted it to cock-on-opening with a Dayton-Traister trigger. Single-stage. Got used to it quickly; no problems.

All my hunting rifles in these later decades have single-stage triggers. Mostly around two-pound pull.

As far as I'm concerned, it's purely one's personal preference. I see no particular advantage to either, once one is reflexively used to the system.
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Old December 7, 2007, 09:52 AM   #10
SR420
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All of my 14s have military 2-stage trigger groups.
4 of them have a 4.5 pound sniper trigger conversion.
Smooth a silk and clean breaks

My AK types are Chinese - excellent single stage FCG.
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Old December 7, 2007, 06:10 PM   #11
Alleykat
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I went with the JP, primarily because it breaks just like the Timney triggers on my Remmy 700 varmint rifles. Was pulling @ 2.5#, until I went back to the factory Bushy hammer spring. No creep; no overtravel; no takeup.
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Old December 9, 2007, 01:57 AM   #12
hksigwalther
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The two stage trigger has two portions that can be felt during its travel when being depressed. In both cases, the trigger is under pressure from a spring (first stage) and, depending on the trigger, the striker or sear and sometimes also a second spring (second stage).

The first stage usually has a much longer travel than the second stage. The first stage is normally called take-up (and some other synonyms) but should not be confused with slack. Slack is just loose play in the trigger that isn't seeing any pressure from a spring or any other forces. For some adjustable triggers, the pull weight can be adjusted as well as length of travel (pre-travel).

At the end of the first stage, you'll experience a definite stop. This is the beginning of the second stage. It works essentially like a single stage trigger from here on. What you normally would experience with a single stage is the same. There may be creep, there may be overtravel, etc. Normally, folks would usually adjust to remove as much creep as possible without compromising safety. Also, second stage pull weight (and for some adjustable triggers, overtravel) is adjusted to shooter preferences.

Taking-up the first stage and stopping at the second before sending the round is known as staging the trigger.

As noted above, a single stage is essentially a two stage without the take-up (the first stage).

Quote:
One of the shooters at the club has his trigger set to around 50g - around 1.1lbs.


50 g is about 0.11 lbs. (1.8 oz)
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Old December 9, 2007, 08:34 AM   #13
knzn
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Quote:
Are you all talking about a set trigger?
Not the same thing.
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