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Old October 29, 2007, 02:21 AM   #1
gvf
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CCW Outside and Cold Weather Gun Functioning ?

As winter comes- and when it comes to my area - Western NY area - it COMES. I CCW outside and will at least to the point I or no self-respecting BG would peep out: below 15 or 20F.

So, how to you CCW under all that clothing so you can get to it - (and NO, I'm not keeping a parka open all the time at 18F and a wind of 20mph.)

AND: I have 2 revolvers: Colt Python and Colt Dectective + 1 semi-auto, Glock .45 GAP, I carry. I keep all clean and oiled. Any chance their mechanisms will get screwed up when it gets bitter - if so is auto more likely to?

I do have a good IWB Alessi holster and sometimes carry the Python that way. And this would keep that gun close to body for warmth - problem is how to get to it under winter clothing.

Last Q: if there can be functioning problems in cold with any gun, any gun lube better than others in such temps to avoid that?

Thanks!

Last edited by gvf; October 29, 2007 at 02:23 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old October 29, 2007, 03:37 AM   #2
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1. When I wear heavy clothes in the winter, I switch from a IWB (VMII) to an OWB holster. I think my current one is a G&G three slot. It makes the handgun eastier get to in the winter time considering you are wearing gloves and have on a heavy coat. It still keeps the handgun close to my body and reasonably warm. Practice clearing your cover garmet from over your weapon. Somebody I know used a crossdraw in the winter.

2. Lubrication: I carry semi autos. My normal lubrication is RIG+ and Enos Slideglide. When it gets as cold as you are talking about, I switch to either Shooters Choice or TW-25B. In minus degree weather, any lubricant is going to thinken up.

Or you could always stay inside where it's warm.

Edit: When going to the range, I made sure to lube handgun with the normal stuff. After cleaning the weapon, reapply the cold weather lube.

Last edited by standerson; October 29, 2007 at 06:13 AM.
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Old October 29, 2007, 05:22 AM   #3
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it snowed yesterday

BreakFree CLP if you must; I keep the carry gun dry; I put it in my parka pocket.

Brrr.....
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Old October 29, 2007, 07:51 AM   #4
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Parka pocket. Gloves can be a bitch though.
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Old October 29, 2007, 08:10 AM   #5
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I wear a coat with a reach-through pocket that lets you reach your own pockets or weapon. As long as it's a compact sort, no problem pulling it through.

Alternatively, if I'm not going to take the coat off, shoulder rig.
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Old October 29, 2007, 08:31 PM   #6
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I thought the synthetic based oils were not so likely to congeal at low temps, but I would perhaps avoid grease. And whatever oil you use I would use sparingly. Not sparing the parts that need it, just a thin coating. And that might also attract less pocket lint and crumbs etc. that you might get in a pocket! I would wonder if moisture condensation is an issue with guns that come out of the cold ice cold themselves and then warm up. Or is it vice versa? I don't do cold weather shooting so dunno. Maybe stainless is best?
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Old October 29, 2007, 10:43 PM   #7
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Backpocket Seecamp. This is based on years of experience in Western NY and Alaska

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Old October 30, 2007, 02:04 AM   #8
gvf
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Thanks - these are very helpful suggestions.

There's also a weird thought that just occurred to me: get one of those pads that heat up when exposed to air, for muscle pain (and they do actually heat up, at least the ones I've used) and stick in your pocket alongside the pocket-holster, or - if it's a belt holster - stick the pad on outside of holster (they adhere).

Likely, if it's THAT cold though - stay in and watch TV.
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Old October 30, 2007, 07:59 AM   #9
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Keep it dry, and you'll have less trouble. You're not likely to be out in any cold that will affect your gun, unless you're planning on moving to the Russian front.
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Old October 31, 2007, 03:10 AM   #10
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I have been paying attention to these posts about cold weather and how to deal with it. The ones that make the most sense, to me, is to run them dry.

Probably not going to get into a firefight and the few you may shoot, pray to the good lord you don't have to, won't harm a thing.
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Old October 31, 2007, 03:59 AM   #11
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I say 'dry', but.....

My choices: one 1911 wearing Robar's NP3; one Witness wearing Cogan's hardchrome.

So dry ain't quite so 'dry'.......
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Old October 31, 2007, 08:05 AM   #12
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Quote:
AND: I have 2 revolvers: Colt Python and Colt Dectective + 1 semi-auto, Glock .45 GAP, I carry.
Living in Southern New Mexico, not too concerned about extreme temp's, but nice to notice that your carry guns will take care of the extra cloths one encounters. Like many, I do favor heavier calibers for that very reason and easier to conceal.
As far as lube goes for my situation: I'm more for grease than oils....
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Old October 31, 2007, 11:02 PM   #13
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In the winter I wear my smartcarry in a rather unconventional way. I wear it across my chest just under the nipple line and I had my SO make a strap with a couple of clips that goes over my one shoulder to keep the smartcarry from slipping down. Usually I wear flannel shirts, so I leave a button open when needed and its real easy to just reach in and grab my 642. The gun stays warm this way and I’ve never had a prob with printing. When inside you can button the button and nobody has a clue you’re carrying. In warmer months I switch back to a fist kydex IWB appendix carry. Senty solutions (dry lube) are my choice for the 642.
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Old October 31, 2007, 11:46 PM   #14
standerson
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Quote:
I have been paying attention to these posts about cold weather and how to deal with it. The ones that make the most sense, to me, is to run them dry.
Don't want to do that. You stand a much higher chance of malfunction. The slide could not fully return to battery and galling could be a problem. I was at the range last week. A guy beside me had a 1911 that would not full return to battery after a shot. He would cycle the slide and fire another shot. Same problem.

We broke it down. Dry as a bone. I had a tube of lube in my range bag and greased it up. Functioned flawlessly.
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Old November 1, 2007, 08:23 AM   #15
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I know that Glocks with Break-Free work just fine down to -40 F or so.
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Old November 1, 2007, 08:38 AM   #16
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Glocks with Mobil 1 will work down to -58*F or so. If you're shooting in a colder environment than that, you should probably run pretty close to dry. If you run a Glock completely dry, you'll have problems.
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Old November 1, 2007, 01:54 PM   #17
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I lived most of my life in Wyoming. One Novemeber we camped for 3 days hunting deer in 40-50 below weather. Nobody did anything special to their guns - just the standard cleaned and lightly oiled with whatever gun oil we had at the time. After 3 days in that cold, every gun worked just fine.
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Old November 1, 2007, 03:45 PM   #18
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We broke it down. Dry as a bone. I had a tube of lube in my range bag and greased it up. Functioned flawlessly.
+++1 on that...When NM started their CCW licenses, you had to qualify in each caliber instead of the highest covering all the lower ones...Anyway, I borrowed a fellow shooters gun in a .40SW and I had the same results as Standerson's comments: dry as a bone. Took care of it on the spot.
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Old November 2, 2007, 05:23 AM   #19
standerson
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Quote:
+++1 on that...When NM started their CCW licenses, you had to qualify in each caliber instead of the highest covering all the lower ones...Anyway, I borrowed a fellow shooters gun in a .40SW and I had the same results as Standerson's comments: dry as a bone. Took care of it on the spot
I keep a tube of TW-25B in my range bag just for situations like that.
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Old November 2, 2007, 04:50 PM   #20
moose fat
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Hmmm,

I was thinking revolvers, and my hunting long guns.

ATF, automatic transmision fluid, and there is another, mil-spec, cold weather machine gun oil that is supposed to be good.

I carry my S&W340PD in an outside pocket, parka or Carhart Extreme Coveralls.
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Old November 3, 2007, 09:06 AM   #21
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Quote:
It you're shooting in a colder environment than that.....
Any colder than -58 you should probably just stay home and throw wood on the fire.
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Old November 3, 2007, 11:30 AM   #22
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Quote:
Glocks with Mobil 1 will work down to -58*F or so. If you're shooting in a colder environment than that, you should probably run pretty close to dry.
If its -58, I am so lubed myself that I cant see the sights...you think the Russkies invented Vodka to make Pina Coladas on their tropical beaches?

Besides what self respecting criminal is out at -58F. If they are, you hit em with a ball peen hammer and they shatter...

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Old November 3, 2007, 05:43 PM   #23
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This looks like a good thread to throw in my advice about choosing our coats and such carefully. Drawstrings on the garments could sometimes be called 'impede your draw-strings'.
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Old November 3, 2007, 08:58 PM   #24
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Mobil 1 does flow and work @ -58*; however, I was really posting tongue-in-cheek. It also flows and won't boil off @ over 400*F. Don't be out shooting in that kind of weather, either.
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Old November 3, 2007, 09:33 PM   #25
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We need to sticky this somewhere, I guess.

Until Hurricane Katrina damaged the refineries, Breakfree CLP and Mobil 1 were made of the same base fluid, Polyalphaolefin synthetic oil CAS #: 68037-01-4.

Since that time, reduced supplies have made it uneconomical to continue to make Mobil 1 from PAO so it has been reformulated while Breakfree CLP is still made of PAO. PAO has marginally better film strength and cold weather characteristics than the reformulated Mobil 1 according to Trapper L (apparently the TFL resident oil expert), but for all practical purposes the two oils should perform very similarly.

As far as the original question goes, I think a person is ok as long as they're not using significant quantities of grease as a lubricant. Most gun oils (especially the better ones) have taken cold-weather performance into account as a design parameter.
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