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Old October 15, 2007, 07:44 PM   #1
hunter33
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Gun rest for sighting in rifles

I am gonna be buying another gun rest for sighting in my rifles does it really have a big difference in a high priced one compared to a lower prices ones.Maybe you can show me some links or name some nice ones thanks-Jett
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Old October 15, 2007, 08:16 PM   #2
Full-choke
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Every one I know LOVES the Lead Sled, I believe it is a Caldwell. You can weight them down real good, but I heard don't do more then 50 lbs. That is when the sled stops moving and the rifle sends the recoil to the stock and can split it.

I have an MTM that I like pretty well. My only complain is that the thing doesn't have adequate area for weight. My weighs in total about 10 lbs with 6 lbs of rice in the hold, I would like to see it up to about 20. It adjusts real easily, good and sturdy too for being plastic. I got mine from Cabela's real reasonable...

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Old October 18, 2007, 03:25 AM   #3
CamoCop
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i use a caldwell "tack driver" bag. i believe i only paid approximately $15.00 for the bag and $8.00 worth of kitty litter for a filler. i have no complaints with it. the caldwell "lead sled" mentioned above is nice, but i couldn't talk myself into spending $150.00
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Old October 18, 2007, 05:10 PM   #4
hayseed51
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Yeah, I've been using the MTM too. got it from Graf & Sons. For $35, I don't think you can beat it. Plastic, but works pretty well. In one respect, I like it better than the Cauldwell. It's easier to get your cheek down on the buttstock for me.

Over 200 rds of 325 WSM and about 30 out of the old 375 in the last two weeks... What a difference! One thing I did do to improve their design was to attach some 1 1/2" velcro to the front rest. Once the rifle is in place, I can just fasten the "loop" section across the top of the barrel. Works well for controling muzzle flip.

Full Choke - Why don't you get a couple bags of lead shot to throw in the compartment. 50#s really tames things down.
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Old October 18, 2007, 07:30 PM   #5
bigbird34
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Uncle Bud

I use an Uncle Bud's Shootin bag (A Bull Bag) ,it's shaped like an X and is about 14 or so inches long,filled with play sand it runs app.40 pounds ,you don't move on the bench with it ,most people that have tried my Bull bag really like it ....I also use a rabbit ear bag for the rear of the stock,and a Pachmyer (sp) recoil pad for the big guns ....my fried uses a "Varmiter rest" I hate it ...and he's liking the bull Bag much better that the varmiter rest .See Ya BB
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Old October 18, 2007, 07:59 PM   #6
FirstFreedom
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+1 to Caldwell lead sled - hmmm, interesting about stocks breaking on big boomers or too much weight. It might be wise to put a little foam or cloth in the rear where all there is is a bit of canvas and thin padding before the steel.
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Old October 19, 2007, 01:50 PM   #7
Bogie
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Consider that a rifle needs consistent recoil to group accurately. If the "sleds" actually worked all that well, folks who are competing in unlimited benchrest competition with their heavy or sporter rifles would be using them... I'd recommend using a good conventional rest with a good rear bag. A little talcum powder doesn't hurt.
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Old October 19, 2007, 11:28 PM   #8
hayseed51
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Bogie - Yes, I see your point. It may be more valid for target shooters. The rifles that I was working with are hunting rifles. The recoil-rest I used primarily for working up loads. You can bet that I shot both from a number of postions, untethered, after I had established good loads for each. No substitute for shooting rifles in similar conditions to how your going to expect them and yourself to be at best. Actually, neither rifle required sight adjustments offhand.
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Old October 19, 2007, 11:55 PM   #9
CrazyIvan007
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I like using bean bag rests for my sighting in, and it is pretty reliable.

Check these out:

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...rest&noImage=0

I found a pair of vinyl ones at Dick's for about $20. But same concept. Sighted in my 24" Bushmaster very good, until I got a bipod.
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Old October 20, 2007, 09:20 AM   #10
FirstFreedom
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I think you make a good point, Bogie. The sleds that control recoil are definitely not going to work for top notch accuracy for that reason.

I was about to say that they are fine for hunting accuracy, BUT I can't really say that as I don't know for sure.

Does anyone know if a sled's failure to let the rifle recoil naturally, as it would on your shoulder - can this *significantly* affect hunting accuracy? Could it truly throw off the shot more than say, 1 or 2" at 100 yards, you think?
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Old October 20, 2007, 09:45 PM   #11
hayseed51
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First Freedom -

In the last session mentioned above with the recoil-rest, I got two 3 shot groups to lay in about 1 1/4" at 300 yds. I was really pleased with that and then proceeded to fire 3 shot groups from prone w/bipod, sitting w/bipod, and offhand braced against a post. Still firing at 300, the groups were not as tight, but they were still centered at previous point of impact. I made no adjustments to the scope...
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Old October 20, 2007, 11:31 PM   #12
Benonymous
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I use a Caldwell Jr. machine rest and a rabbit ear bag under the stock for either bench or prone. The setup works well and is less hassle than bags of rice or sugar or anything like that.
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Old October 21, 2007, 10:07 AM   #13
FirstFreedom
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Quote:
In the last session mentioned above with the recoil-rest, I got two 3 shot groups to lay in about 1 1/4" at 300 yds. I was really pleased with that and then proceeded to fire 3 shot groups from prone w/bipod, sitting w/bipod, and offhand braced against a post. Still firing at 300, the groups were not as tight, but they were still centered at previous point of impact. I made no adjustments to the scope...
Hayseed (snicker), thank you - that's exactly the kind of info I was looking for.
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Old October 21, 2007, 10:13 AM   #14
fisherman66
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FF, I woulda swore you wanted to hear about a ballistic gel replica of a shoulder to insert between the rifle's buttpad and the sled. Afterward you get to see how the round performs on a spineless "man".
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Old October 21, 2007, 10:32 AM   #15
defence18
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My father uses a Caldwell Lead Sled because he a) got the gastric bypass surgery and has lost a ton of weight, causing him to feel recoil like he never has; and b) because he was working up a load for Alaska brown bear hunting out of a .45-70 HiWall. When it got closer to the hunt, he scrapped the lead sled, and like hayseed, saw no significant change of impact. I, however, cannot stand the lead sled. I cannot get used to not feeling the rifle on my shoulder. I would think that if you are really worried about the the effect of the recoil on accuracy, you would attack the velcro straps that people use to harness the gun on the rest. If you do not let the gun naturally whip, you will have a much greater change when not using those straps. I use Cabela's Premier Rifle Rest, and am pretty happy with it. I am not thrilled with the handles on the rest to tighten it into place, but I thinking of swapping them out anyway.
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Old October 22, 2007, 03:11 PM   #16
blue9
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I guess the question that answers it for me is the following: did you buy your rifle for the range or for the field? And, BTW, there is no wrong answer here, so I'm not looking for the wrath of the elder statesmen on this board.

If you bought it for the range, then spend a ton of money, get the perfect sled and be the hero of the range. If it's for the field, save some of that money for a plane ticket to your favorite hunt. After endless research on this same topic, that's the question I asked myself and picked up the Caldwell DeadShot Front and Rear Bags. The bags are great, and I use them to sight in the gun for the ultimate prize: the actual hunt. Actually, the rear rest isn't really needed - just the front bag is plenty.

Plus, the way I figure it, the range is all about minimizing variables to get those perfect groupings ... things that will NEVER happen in the field, so why learn to rely on crutches that you won't have out there?
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Old October 22, 2007, 09:38 PM   #17
RedneckFur
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I use a Caldwell Rock front rest, and a shooter's choice rear bag. It works very well for me.
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Old October 22, 2007, 10:15 PM   #18
Jets2007
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Caldwell Sandbags... $25 or so for the front and rear bags.... no need to spend $80-$100 on an elaborate rest if you don't have to.
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Old October 23, 2007, 12:34 AM   #19
Tifosi
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Sorry, I don't get the theory, bags are great for zeroing your hunting rifle, we ain't talking benchrest are we? We are talking hunting (thining ut the herd, PC) and not practicing on paper targets. Hunting Guns need zeroing but not with a micrometer.
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Old October 25, 2007, 01:36 AM   #20
model70fan
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A good caldwell softsand bag does a perfect job, no need for a big vice to hold the rifle, to shoot properly in a hunting situation you need to hold the rifle to your shoulder anyway right? So why not do it while sighting in and practicing? I can shoot sub MOA goups off a bag easily while benched, proper trigger and breath control is as good as a vice in my book
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