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Old September 20, 2007, 01:41 PM   #1
psdan000
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Changing a Remington 700 barrel

what all is involved? is it something i could do myself (i am no gunsmith) or should a qualified gunsmith do it? if so what things should i make sure the gunsmith knows about doing this job before i ask them to do it. thanks, Dan.
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Old September 20, 2007, 01:59 PM   #2
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Take it to a gunsmith. If you want to make sure it is done right, replace the recoil lug with a new one (about $7, IIRC), or go with an aftermarket oversized recoil lug (but it will cost more). Either way, it's not a difficult job if you have the tools, but if you don't, it's just about impossible.
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Old September 20, 2007, 02:41 PM   #3
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Thanks Scorch, sorry for the lack of knowlege here, if i replace the recoil lug with a thicker/bigger one will i have to make any other modifications to the stock or anything? what are the advantages of doing this?
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Old September 20, 2007, 06:29 PM   #4
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You will also need to remove some material in the recoil lug area if you go to the thicker lug. You would remove material towards the front of the rifle. You can have the smith do the stock modification or do it yourself. The other thing the smith will have to do is turn the barrel shank back. Since the oversized recoil lug is thicker than the Remington lug, you have to remove some metal on the shank in order for the barrel to be fully seated.

The primary advantage of an oversize lug would be to have a more solid recoil surface to ensure you have a solid connection between the stock and the action. The stock recoil lugs often crack right at the top, allowing the recoil lug to flex and move, affecting accuracy, or flex under recoil, causing the same effect.
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Old September 21, 2007, 03:34 PM   #5
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would you still recommend this modification on a .204 ruger that has very little recoil? also, what should the ballpark cost be of just getting a barrel switched out minus the recoil lug installation? thanks for the help, Dan.
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Old September 21, 2007, 04:33 PM   #6
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On a 204 I would not even bother with replacing the recoil lug unless it is damaged. Most gunsmiths will have a nominal charge for removing and replacing a barrel, but if it requires checking headspace the charge may go up.
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Old September 22, 2007, 09:13 PM   #7
psdan000
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he did mention something about checking headspace, but also said he may not need to do that. what exactly is checking headspace? the rifle is less than a year old, maybe 500 rounds through it and the recoil lug looks good to me. just replacing the sporter barrel with a heavy fluted barrel. Thanks again for the help Scorch.

Dan
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Old September 24, 2007, 12:21 AM   #8
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If you are going to replace the barrel, ANY barrel, you have to check headspace. Headspace is the distance from the bolt face to the shoulder datum point. If there is too much headspace, a cartridge fired in the chamber will rupture. If not enough, you will not be able to chamber a round. It is vital to how the rifle works.

Most aftermarket barrels as either short-chambered or long-chambered, either one requiring more than just removing and replacing the barrel.
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Old September 24, 2007, 10:29 PM   #9
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i gotcha. the barrel i am replacing it with is not aftermarket, it is a new take off barrel from another remington 700. thanks again for the help.
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Old September 25, 2007, 05:28 PM   #10
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Check the headspace - manufacturing tollerances stack-up and you may need to adjust it.

You might get lucky too. A decent smith will take care of all that, though.




-tINY

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