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Old May 9, 2007, 09:11 AM   #1
veeref
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Brass cases split while tumbling...

Hey folks, thanks for the advice on getting me started reloading. I am now hooked enough that I honestly look forward to shooting so I can go reload some more brass.

Up to now, I usually shoot WWB and keep the brass, but recently I purchased a couple pounds of eBay. 95% of the lot is good shiny brass, but there's a few I inspected that looked okay other than some discoloration I can't identify. It's probably corroded. There's a couple that were discolored that I reloaded and shot. Upon tumbling them again, the necks split. The pictures show what they look like (I crushed the ones I found unsatisfactory).

Can you guys tell me if I need to toss my brass that has ANY of this discoloration on it?

Regards,
~V
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Old May 9, 2007, 12:12 PM   #2
rwilson452
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split necks

I have never seen a case neck split for tumbleing it either happens when fired or when seating a bullet. Split necks get tossed, period. With a low pressure load like a .45ACP I shoot them until the split. Discoloration is not a bad thing by itself. Look at the case a little closer. if the case looks etched in the area of discoloration toss it. IS it rough in the area of discoloration or otherwise smooth somewhat shiny? If you loading a magnum or bottleneck case and it's discolored I would reject it.
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Old May 9, 2007, 12:53 PM   #3
Mike Irwin
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What are the head stamps on that brass?

Tumbling shouldn't cause splits to occur, but it will make splits visible.
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Old May 9, 2007, 01:12 PM   #4
Shoney
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The case you show in the two pictures, appears to have been heavily corroded and then cleaned up. It is pitted and discolored. The parts of the brass that appear redish are where the tin has been leached or corroded out of the brass, making it brittle.

As has been stated, case mouths do not spit from tumbling. There are many factors and many more combinations of factors that cause premature splitting of brass. The two most common cause are:
Overworking the brass during reloading - i.e. over belling the mouth;
Hot loads;

As far as counting the number of times handgun brass has been fired, I only count the first two. My PD ammo is loaded only in once fired and twice fired cases, then the cases go into practice ammo. I do not count the number of times my handbun practice ammo brass has been loaded, just load them til they split.
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Old May 9, 2007, 07:47 PM   #5
rfdillon
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One of the reasons that I insist on tumbling before resizing is that tumbling cleans the brass well enough to see it. That's important as eyes get older, but I have never seen brass split because of tumbling. Discoloration usually is not a reason to get rid of brass, but if it is pitted, badly scratched, deeply dented, etc., then if it is in a common caliber, why not get rid of it? Clean well, and you will be able to better see your brass.
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Old May 9, 2007, 08:17 PM   #6
mrawesome22
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Cases splitting while tumbling? What media are you using? Rocks?
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Old May 9, 2007, 09:51 PM   #7
veeref
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Quote:
The case you show in the two pictures, appears to have been heavily corroded and then cleaned up. It is pitted and discolored. The parts of the brass that appear redish are where the tin has been leached or corroded out of the brass, making it brittle.

As has been stated, case mouths do not spit from tumbling. There are many factors and many more combinations of factors that cause premature splitting of brass. The two most common cause are:
Overworking the brass during reloading - i.e. over belling the mouth;
Hot loads
I think you hit it right on the head. The brass I pictured was probably corroded enough for it to split when I fired it. I think tumbling it just made it obvious.

I have since fired several cases that shared the same outward appearance and coloration, and several of them split while I fired them today at the range.

They were Winchester brass, starting loads in 40 S&W.

QUESTION: As an aside, will split cases while I'm shooting damage my firearm?

Thanks for the replies.
Regards,
~V
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Old May 9, 2007, 11:22 PM   #8
Mike Irwin
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"As an aside, will split cases while I'm shooting damage my firearm?"

No.
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Old May 13, 2007, 08:55 PM   #9
Zippy06
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I believe, tumbling makes the splits, easier to see.
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Old May 13, 2007, 09:21 PM   #10
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Discoloration doesn't effect the brass at all. I've got a batch of 40 year old .38 special that is almost black.

The tumbling just made he existing splits easier to see.
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