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Old April 9, 2007, 09:38 PM   #1
zerofixer
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220 gr 40 s/w loads

Hi all, does anyone load 220 grain loads for 40S/W, I been loadind 200 grs for a few months now and have had no problems, there running about 800 fps and shoot flat, I have come across about 5000, 220 gr LTC I can get them for $60.00, i was buying up all of his 200 gr and the guy at the gun store found the 220 grs, he said he would give me a good deal on them, what do you all think thanks mike
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Old April 9, 2007, 10:33 PM   #2
Shoney
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I do not see a single data file for a 220 gr 40S&W. You should measure the diameter to make sure they are 0.400. They may be 41Mag bullets. With a bullet that long, you are either going to get squib loads because of insuficient powder, or over pressure loads, because of decreased space or compression of the powder. There will probably not be much middle ground for an acceptable load.

Go to the Vihtavuori site and download the pistol load manual. Look at the data for N105 and the 200 gr XTP. I am getting 1120fps with the 200gr XTP.
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Old April 9, 2007, 10:50 PM   #3
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If you wanted a 10mm, you should have bought one!

A 200 grain bullet in a .40 S&W is pushing things; how much depends upon what propellant, how much and the degree to which you've 'long-loaded." A 220 is far more a problem than a solution.

I max my .40's at 180 grains, even long-loading. I'm not blowing up a $2,500 gun on pointless experimentation.

IF you do insist on going that route, at least check out the Enos Forum. You'll probably find people who have tried your proposed stunt there.
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Old April 9, 2007, 10:58 PM   #4
zerofixer
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just a question

I dont want a 10mm , and it is not a stunt, just wanted to know if it was possible so i could buy the bullets, some times in my area bullets are hard to come buy, not many reloading stores around here that have bullets, if it dont work i wont do it, like i said just wanted to know, i just got into the 40 cal pistols, been reloading for 9mm/45acp/223/308/30-06/5.7x28mm, in 23 years i have done fine have not blown up nothing, that why i ask the opnions of others to see what they think anyway thanks
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Old April 10, 2007, 11:15 AM   #5
Johnny Guest
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I wouldn't do it, myself

Really, you're already pushing the envelope in using the 200 gr bullets.

From the .40 S&W notes in Speer Rifle & Pistol Reloading Manual No. 12:
Quote:
We are sometimes asked for loading data for the Speer 200 grain TMJ in the 40 S&W. When seated to the proper cartridge overall length, the bullet heel is so deep in the case that sidewall bulges often develop with failures to feed or chamber. Velocities are also quite low, so we don't recommend this bullet for the 40 S&W.
It should also be noted that this cartridge is already working with an industry pressure maximum of 35,000 psi. It is ALREADY a high intensity cartridge, and there are NO "Plus-P" loads for it. Even if you could work out the seating for a 220 grain bullet, you'd probably be hard put to reach even 800 fps with a safe load.

I believe the particular 220 LTC bullet to which you refer, if sized to .400", was originated for use in the 10mm auto pistol. That cartridge case has plenty of length to allow for deep seating. The pistols chambered therefor are also set up for high pressures and can still yield respectable velocities with the heavier projectiles. The 5K for $60 does sound like a heckuva deal - - I'm just not sure how useful they'll turn out to be in the .40.

You don't give any details of the handgun for which you're loading. If it is one of the 10mm/.40 S&W revolvers, then of course, the above information may not apply. If so, you might want to procure some 10mm brass and go after it.

If what you have is an autopistol, then I'd personally NOT do it. Of course, it's your gun, your components, and your choice.

Best,
Johnny
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Old April 10, 2007, 03:32 PM   #6
zerofixer
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thanks for the info

Thanks Much pistol info below
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Old April 10, 2007, 03:37 PM   #7
zerofixer
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thanks for the info

thats cool!! I wont try it, I just wanted to know if it would work, my friend is going to buy them for his 10mm, I have got only 500 out of the 8000 200 gr LFP I had bought, were is a good place to buy 180and under bullets? I like to shoot a lot, my pistols are a sig226 in 40 and a xd-40 4 inch, I got a new m&p 40 in january and it is at 4500 plus rounds already thanks much!! mike

Last edited by zerofixer; April 10, 2007 at 04:58 PM.
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