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Old March 25, 2007, 08:45 PM   #1
Bubsy
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The right way to hold a revolver for firing

Hopefully, if NYPD cooperates and I believe they will, I'll be the proud owner of a handgun in the next few months. My gun of choice is the Smith and Wesson Model 14 6" barrel revolver assuming I can locate one somewhere.

I'm curious though as to whether there is a "correct" way to hold a handgun or, more specifically a revolver when firing it? I've had no formal training, but when I've been at the range, I've found myself to be most accurate in shooting and most comfortable in shooting when I hold the revolver in my right hand (I'm right handed) and brace my left hand on my right wrist just below the revolver. I've been told that I should wrap my left hand around my right hand, but that seems unnatural to me. Is that the "correct" way of shooting a revolver?

Sorry to be so naive, but I'm new to shooting a revolver. I've primarily shot rifles in the past and needless to say, holding a rifle is very different than holding a revolver.

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Old March 25, 2007, 09:03 PM   #2
skeeter1
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There no rights or wrong here, just what works best for you.

For me, a firm right-hand grip and my left hand cupped around the butt of the handgrip with fingers going over on to my right hand. There might be something better, but after 50 years, it's the only way I know how to shoot a handgun. If someone has a better idea, please chime in. I'm always open to suggestions.
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Old March 25, 2007, 09:07 PM   #3
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There are some nice tutorials published in texts and online. However, if you have a bit of extra time and can swing it, I'd really recommend registering for some hands-on instruction. In my experience, reading was useful, but not a substitute for knowledgeable hands-on instruction in a course. I really liked my experience in Springfield, MA at the Smith & Wesson Academy, but am sure there are other quality places offering training.
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Old March 25, 2007, 09:43 PM   #4
Mike P. Wagner
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Quote:
There are some nice tutorials published in texts and online.
Do you have some links to some revolver specific info? Most of what I have seen on line has been for pistols (unsually 1911).

I am not the exact same mechanics apply. For example, there seems to be comfort point for me with my revovler that is *not* the absolute highest grip I can get. When my hand is at that place, my trigger finger is pulling straight back, and does not appear to move the front site. If I move my hand any higher on the grip, my trigger finger is sort of "hinging down" on the trigger, rather than pulling straight back. That motion also appears to perturb the sights. It's sort of hard to explain, but I know what it feels like.

I'd be interested in reading some revolver specific tutorials. If anyone knows of some.

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Old March 25, 2007, 10:07 PM   #5
CarbineCaleb
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Quote:
Do you have some links to some revolver specific info? Most of what I have seen on line has been for pistols (unsually 1911).
Hmmm, unfortunately, it's been a few years since I read that stuff online, so I don't have any links handy - sorry.

My main point though was that for me at least, grip, as well as the finer points of other aspects, e.g., holsterwork, were best learned at the Smith & Wesson Academy. The instructor was extremely knowledgeable, and in the grip section of the training, he just came around and one by one, inspected everyone's hands at the firing line and adjusted them with explanation until they were just as they needed to be. Then after a few cycles of having that kind of individualized inspection and correction done, it became second nature, and the right grip just 'felt right'.

Just seeing a photo or two of grip and a few paragraphs didn't get me at least, really doing it properly. He showed me how to fit my hands together in a complementary, interlocking manner, get my thumbs pointed forward and braced on the frame, index my trigger finger properly on the frame, and use a kind of hinged grip - hinged at the front, to squeeze the revolver grip a bit between the palms and control the weapon better in recoil. I could shoot before I learned that, but could shoot better afterward, no doubt, and I don't think I'd ever have quite gotten it from reading.

Maybe others can learn these things better from text than I, but just trying to pass along my experience.
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Old March 26, 2007, 07:17 AM   #6
Jkwas
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This helped me a lot when starting out...

http://www.handgunsmag.com/tactics_training/grip_0925/
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Old March 26, 2007, 03:15 PM   #7
Desert01
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From the Master, JERRY MICULEK:



[URLhttp://www.shootingusa.com/PRO_TIPS/JERRY_MICULEK/jerry_miculek.html[/URL]

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Last edited by Desert01; March 26, 2007 at 03:16 PM. Reason: Link
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