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Old March 12, 2007, 11:51 PM   #1
TargetTerror
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686 spring kits

I tried a competition prepped 627 at an action match tonight, and was blown away by how light the DA trigger was. I have a bone stock 686, but was wondering what it would take to lighten the trigger pull.

The guy said that I could buy a spring kit, but that I would really need to polish and smooth everything or the gun wouldn't function properly. I think he was thinking of the lightest springs when he said that, but is there any merit to his comment? My 686 is used and well broken in, and the trigger definitely feels smooth. My issue with it is the weight of the pull in DA (SA is AMAZING).

I saw the offering from Wolff, at:

http://www.gunsprings.com/Revolver/S...NF.html#S&WKLN

would I need anything else besides the Type-2 PowerRib Shooters pack?

Also, how complicated is it to install? I'm pretty good mechanically (I can easily change the brakes on my car), but I'm not a gunsmith and don't want to poke around inside my gun too much.
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Old March 13, 2007, 12:20 AM   #2
Mike Irwin
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"I would really need to polish and smooth everything or the gun wouldn't function properly."

Maybe, maybe not. Each revolver is an individual.

A good polishing will, in conjunction with new springs, help with felt trigger pull by reducing drag and hitching.

I would heartily recommend getting yourself a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's shop manual for S&W revolvers.

Replacing the springs is not particularly difficult, but you have to follow certain steps very carefully or you can damage the gun. Removing the sideplate is one such step.
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Old March 14, 2007, 06:38 AM   #3
FM12
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DOUBLE!! what Mike Irwin said...getting the rebound slide spring back in is especially tricky...mating the side plate to the side while getting the safety bar in the right place is a bit tricky also (TRUST ME ON THESE THINGS!) But all in all, can be done by the average person, might want to get some help for the first time, though.
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Old March 14, 2007, 07:22 AM   #4
TargetTerror
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Thanks for the advice! Any tips on getting the side plate off? And do you know of any site that has either photos or instructions?
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Old March 14, 2007, 08:50 AM   #5
Mike Irwin
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Jerry Kuhnhausen's book has the pictures AND directions that you need.

Taking the side plate off an S&W revolver must be done properly, or you'll damage it; same with replacing it.

NEVER EVER pry the side plate off. You'll only damage the gun.

This is what you need: http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=314178
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Old March 14, 2007, 08:57 AM   #6
MADISON
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686 Spring Kits

I installed www.wolfgunsprings.com spring kits in all my S&W handguns.
You can easily install a new main spring but, the TRIGGER RETURN SPRING will give you trouble.
After shooting between 500 and 1,000 rounds through the gun the metal should smothen out.
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Old March 14, 2007, 12:40 PM   #7
Mike Irwin
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The trigger return spring, more properly known as the rebound slide spring, has never given me a lick of trouble coming out OR going in again.

You simply need to know how to approach it.
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Old March 14, 2007, 12:41 PM   #8
Gib
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Be careful with the side plate screws as not to mar the heads. (I hate that) Don't start filing parts that you don't know how far to go, you'll ruin the part if you go past the hardness into the soft metal. Some would be gunsmiths actually file the wrong side of the hammer/sear faces. You could end up with an unsafe gun or worse a pile of poop. Go slow be careful and have fun.
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Old March 14, 2007, 04:51 PM   #9
TargetTerror
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Mike (or anyone else, for that matter), what is the best way to apporach the trigger return spring to remove and replace it?
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Old March 14, 2007, 05:53 PM   #10
Gib
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TargetTerror- Be careful when you take out the trigger return spring, it is under a lot of presser and if you don't kept your finger on it could go flying across the room. (Like we all haven't done that one.) Jerry Miculek has a great DVD on Smith and Wessons and he goes thru all the steps and explains them as he goes.
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Old March 15, 2007, 01:03 AM   #11
akviper
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If you choose the potentially unsafe route of messing with the springs you should attend an armouror's course to be sure you don't defeat essential internal safety features. If it's ever used for anything but match shooting don't do it. I know the spring replacers tire of hearing it but the rebound does more than return the trigger and too light a spring can cause the gun to go boom when you may not want it to. A non-factory spec mainspring can fail to ignite a hard primer in a self defense situation.

One of the reasons older used Smiths seem so smooth is use. Dry firing will go a long way toward wearing in the contact surfaces. Filing and polishing the wrong spot can dramatically reduce the life of your revolver and remove surface hardened places that should not be touched. As a S&W revolver armourer I have repaired countless revolvers with botched action jobs and non-spec springs. If it's stricly a toy for match use and you can keep the safety features intact go for it but it usually takes a lot of skill and experience to do an reliable and safe action job.
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Old March 15, 2007, 07:30 AM   #12
TargetTerror
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Thanks for the info, Viper. I bought gun used, quite used, so the action is VERY broken in. It is incredibly smooth. The only issue I have is with the weight of the DA pull. To me, it is just too heavy to be of much use. That is why I am going with some lighter springs. It will be used mostly for target shooting/action shooting.

Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems taht to replace the trigger rebound spring I remove the sideplate by unscrewing and tapping it off (rubber mallet?), push the trigger return piece up with a screw driver, and then use another screw driver or pointy tool to compress and lift the spring out?
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Old March 15, 2007, 09:35 AM   #13
Mike Irwin
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"If you choose the potentially unsafe route of messing with the springs you should attend an armouror's course to be sure you don't defeat essential internal safety features."

Simply swaping out the springs on a Smith & Wesson revolver will NOT defeat the internal safety mechanisms!

If you reinstall the passive block (IF the gun was originally designed with one) and if you don't start grinding on parts with a dremel, you will NOT defeat essential internal safety features.

Once again, I have to ask, what is it about revolvers that makes everyone start ******* their pants?

I've yet to see similar anything even remotely resembling a similar reaction to someone talking about replacing the springs in a semi-auto, even ones that require quite a bit of disassembly.

Usually those messages are met with great acclaim, chest beating, hooting, and congratulatory beverages.
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Old March 24, 2007, 12:28 PM   #14
williamd
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I have tuned a lot of Smith's. You can make them sing tuning the factory parts. A gunsmith in Anaheim, CA (Ben's - but believe he has retired) specialized in this and taught a class. I took it twice. Allowed you to work on your own gun in class. He had 8 1/2 x 11 book with all the poop. It was in a notebook. Will see 1) if I can find it, 2) what if costs to get it copied as it is about 5/8" thick. Requires good tools, from Brownell's or simialr, but not a lot of $$.
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