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Old March 12, 2007, 09:35 AM   #1
Bulldog1806
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Largest caliber magnum load?

What is the largest caliber magnum load there is? I used to have a Browning bar .338 win mag and I was wondering if there was anything bigger. I plan on buying a rifle again and I wanted something huge. No I don't hunt, I just want to have it. I had to sell my Browning years ago to get a valentines day present. I loved that gun and was just thinking about getting something bigger and better.

Yes I know about the .50 cal bmg
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Old March 12, 2007, 09:44 AM   #2
mikejonestkd
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.460 weatherby magnum.....


http://www.weatherby.com/products/ammo.asp?prd_id=13

http://www.galleryofguns.com/gunloca...ther_page=true

It hurts to even think about shooting one...

There are a couple of specialized cartridges out there that are similar in power to the .460 weatherby, but the weatherby is the most common for a 'fairly easily' acquired production rifle.
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Last edited by mikejonestkd; March 14, 2007 at 08:32 AM. Reason: typo
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Old March 12, 2007, 09:47 AM   #3
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Thanks, that just what i'm looking for..
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Old March 12, 2007, 09:49 AM   #4
mikejonestkd
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There are a couple of British Nitro express loads out there that are real thumpers too - similar in performance to the .460 weatherby.
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Old March 12, 2007, 09:49 AM   #5
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The largest I have seen in person is a .458 Win mag, with a 500 gr. bullet. There are probably bigger magnums.

I was watching a hunting show on TV and they were shooting a .577 Nitro Express, shooting a 750 gr. bullet. While technically not a magnum, it is BIG !

I have heard of a .700 Nitro Express which uses a 1000 gr. bullet. You probably need one of these.
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Old March 12, 2007, 09:55 AM   #6
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I have heard of a .700 Nitro Express which uses a 1000 gr. bullet. You probably need one of these.


Holy Cow ! Yes I think your right.
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Old March 12, 2007, 09:58 AM   #7
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http://www.ammo-one.com/A-Square577Tyrannosaur.html
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:06 AM   #8
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Thanks Garry,
The .460 WM is a pop gun compared to the .577 Tyrannosaur...

The .460 top out at 7500 foot pounds of energy...

The .577 has over 10,000 foot pounds of energy...

DANG!!!

I stand corrected.
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:11 AM   #9
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Quote:
Holland & Holland will custom build you an exquisite double rifle for its .700 Nitro Express cartridge, which fires a 1,000-grain bullet at 2000 fps. The price for the rifle is in the $100-200K range, and it takes H&H three and a half to four years to build one.
http://airbornecombatengineer.typepa..._introduc.html
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:11 AM   #10
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.700 Nitro express

Even though it came from before the age of magnums, I think the .700 nitro express, with 1000 grain slug, and 14,373 ft-lbs of energy should fill the bill for most squirrel hunting
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:19 AM   #11
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Thanks to Wikipedia I found this:

http://www.reloadbench.com/cartridges/w585nyati.html

Historical Notes:

With available muzzle energy exceeding 10,000 foot pounds of energy, the 585 Nyati deserves mention as very likely the world's most powerful shoulder gun cartridge. The 50 BMG cartridge is used for sporting purposes and it generates vastly more power than the 585, launching bullets of the same weight 300 fps to 400 fps faster. However, the 50 BMG is not by any stretch of the imagination, a shoulder firearm cartridge. The 585 is.

This cartridge was created by Ross Seyfried by modifying 577 Nitro cases. Besides from forming, the rim has to be turned down to fit the bolt face. Either standard belted magnum or 416 Rigby rim size is used as the bolt requires. Length allows chambering in magnum Mauser actions with minimal modifications. Modified magazine capacity is three cartridges. Seyfried reports very satisfactory accuracy, no doubt a result of careful chambering and quality workmanship throughout the rifle and load. Nyati (n-ya-te) means Cape buffalo in several African languages and this is certainly a good name for a cartridge delivering so much bullet and energy.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.700_Nitro_Express


While the .700 Nitro Express is sometimes touted as the "most powerful commercial round in the world", especially by the manufacturer, this is not exactly true. The .700 Nitro Express double rifle is only available on a custom order basis, and has never seen regular production, while the .585 Nyati which is built under similar circumstances is significantly more powerful. Currently the most powerful rifle cartridge available on a commercial basis is the .50 BMG, although its use is almost entirely restricted to sniping. Still, the .700 Nitro Express is a very powerful round, and is known worldwide by its reputation among serious big-game hunters.

more on the .700 nitro: The .700 Nitro Express develops an approximate average of 8,900 foot pounds of muzzle energy with a 1000 grain bullet at 2000 f/s. However handloaders can push the cartridge to generate as much as 15,000 foot pounds in a modern bolt action, by using a 1000 grain bullet fired at 2600 f/s. However, doing so makes the action of the rifle used nearly inoperable (especially in the case of a boxlock or sidelock rifle), while at the same time rupturing the cartridge casing and the primer cap. The typical average muzzle velocity of a factory-loaded cartridge is 2,000 feet per second.
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:27 AM   #12
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The question is how much you want to spend? .700 Nitro over $100,000 easily. Then there are the bore rifles 4 bore 8 bore. Go to SSK industries web site, how does a .950 JDJ sound? If you want a production gun that doesn’t cost as much as a house go with a Ruger in .458 Lott then you can also shot .458 win mags through them.
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:28 AM   #13
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it's not a browning

Maybe a 4 or 8 bore would be something to look into, i've seen the 8 bore at the tulsa gun show, someone is building them here in the states, after seeing the 8, the 4 bore would be nasty i'm sure!Found an artical on them at...........http://www.riflemagazine.com/magazin....cfm?tocid=553
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Old March 12, 2007, 10:36 AM   #14
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i dont know

Dont know why the above did'nt work so.......DO a yahoo search.....under (8 bore rifle)...........Page 2.....#11..........wolfe publishing company (title) Its a pain but a good story!!!!
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Old March 12, 2007, 11:14 AM   #15
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"Even though it came from before the age of magnums, I think the .700 nitro express, with 1000 grain slug, and 14,373 ft-lbs of energy should fill the bill for most squirrel hunting."

No it didn't.

The .700 Nitro is a recent (1990s) innovation.

The .600 Nitro was from the opening years of the 20th century, but even then the concept of "Magnum" referring to a large cartridge was in use.

The oldest use for the term that I can find was for a cartridge (I disremember which one right now) designed in the 1880s.

EDIT:

Here we go...

It was the .500/.450 Magnum Black Powder Express.
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Old March 12, 2007, 11:36 AM   #16
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Actually Mike, it was developed in the 80's from what I read, but I stand corrected, as I grouped it with the early 20th century Express cartridges developed by the English custom rifle makers, such as Holland & Holland.

Anyway, the .700 is a child of the early 20th century, and nothing more than an extension of those old cartridges, so I'm not far off.
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Old March 12, 2007, 11:43 AM   #17
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475 A&M magnum is the biggest I have actually seen was 10,000 lbs energy and no, I did not shoot it. That would be either a 450 Watts or 378 Weatherby, the Weatherby had the worse recoil!

585 Nyati 577 Tyrannosaur 700 Nitro, perhaps 450 Talbot
are the biggest I have heard about
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Old March 12, 2007, 12:26 PM   #18
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I go to school with a little bit older guy who has a .585 Nyati custom built gun with a custom muzzle break. He said that he actually knocked down a big bear off of its hind legs with it.
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Old March 12, 2007, 12:43 PM   #19
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Ya really don't need anytrhing bigger than a .505 Gibbs!
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Old March 12, 2007, 01:05 PM   #20
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Watch this video, its a 4 bore shooting. Listen to the sound the cartrdiges make when they fall into the chamber.
(No, the men shooting it does not get knocked down!)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=W7lhTqWOS...8B5824&index=0

And heres a video of the mighty .700 nitro express!
http://youtube.com/watch?v=H00gshZW9Po
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Old March 12, 2007, 01:39 PM   #21
Mike Irwin
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I've fired a .505 Gibbs, as well as some of the other big bruisers - .470 Nitro, .416 Rigby, .425 Wesley Richards, .416 Taylor come immediately to painful memory. All of them packed significant wallop.

The .505 was pretty damned unpleasant but certainly doable.

"Anyway, the .700 is a child of the early 20th century, and nothing more than an extension of those old cartridges, so I'm not far off."

Well, if you want to look at it that way, they're all children of the Flobert BB Cap, so we can step it back to 1845ish...

But, my point remains... The .700 is recent development, and really a pointless one. The kind of hunting for which these rifles (British heavy doubles) were originally developed hasn't existed in decades.

The .700 is a quaint anachronism. Sort of like a modern day Model T.
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Old March 12, 2007, 02:08 PM   #22
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If you're not going to actually use it, well ... a cheap 12-gauge has a bigger hole in the end than a 700 Nitro. The problem with those types of weapons is that they're just not practical in any context. There are much better things to kill elephants with.

So you probably need to come to some sort of a conclusion about how practical of a weapon you want. If you're never going to use it, get some kind of massive punt gun.
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Old March 12, 2007, 06:08 PM   #23
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Although uncommon and expensive to shoot, you might be able to get a Lahti L-39 in 20mm.
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Old March 13, 2007, 01:47 AM   #24
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I went out the range about 6 years ago. Some guy had a rest he built so that he could fire standing up. Lord, did that thing bellow. I looked at it, and it had the earmarks of a Weatherby. From the muzzle blast I could tell the guy had it braked. And well he should have, for it was a 460. He wandered over when he saw me watching him, told me what it was, and offered me a shot or two. Like the idiot that I am, I agreed, just so I could say that I have shot one. Mistake. I didn't get a scope cut, but I did get a bloody nose and had to sit for a while. Christ, that is a lot of gun. Too much for me.
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Old March 13, 2007, 04:04 AM   #25
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.460 is a great cartridge.

They're a blast to shoot, a few times. My inexperienced friend stood straight up and fired the .460. Rifle nearly flew out of his hands, it literally knocked him backwards a step.

I'm a first hand witness that that rifle can knock you over...if you're not prepared. Then again, I've seen someone get knock over shooting a 12g. (He was firing it while standing on a slippery rock though.)
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