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Old February 28, 2007, 06:59 PM   #26
buck460XVR
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I dont know about you folks South of the 49th paralell but up here there are laws against capturing and keeping wild animals.

Jseime...I too at first thought "that aint legal!" but then the more I read, the more it sounded made up and the funnier it got. Damn good bullshifter that guy.

In my case, I did nothing illegal and even told my story to a warden friend of mine, who just laughed.
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Old February 28, 2007, 08:59 PM   #27
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Errrm, backstrap is $14 per pound?! That's about what it costs me to per pound of deer meat, but hell, at least I have a bunch of guns and gear left over after the eating is done!

Deer ropin stories.... tee hee. Note to self: If I try to rope that (now-feral) mule that's been eating corn from my feeders, tie other end to tree, not self.
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Old February 28, 2007, 10:17 PM   #28
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I must be in the minority here, b/c I don't really see anything unethical about it. No different than when man first captured wild animals thousands of years ago and domesticated them and started a farm. They were wild animals, he caught them, he raised them & their offspring, he ate them & used them for everything from heavy labor to clothing.

So what's so unethical about doing that today? Because we've "evolved" since the very first farmers?

In India, wild adult elephants are still captured & domesticated. Is that unethical?

In South America, wild lama type animals are caught & sheered for their wool. Is that unethical?

I say it's no less unethical to hunt it down & shoot it than it is to farm it. And no less unethical to farm it vs. farming a chicken or a cow or a goat, imho.

Whether or not it's legal not withhstanding...

Ok, time to bash me....
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Old March 1, 2007, 02:37 PM   #29
Art Eatman
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Aw, I don't see any "bash" deal...

I guess the whole thing--at least for me--is that deer and elk are for hunting, not pen-raising. Sort of a "symbol of the wild" thing, I guess.

Kinda like Ortega y Gasset in his meditations "On Hunting": "One does not hunt in order to kill. One kills in order to have hunted."

A large part of the whole hunting shtick for me is to stay connected--not "re-connect"--to those thousands of generations of forebears who sat around a campfire telling windies about past hunts.

In a way, zoos are neat. At the same time, it's sorta sad to see animals in cages.

Me, I've always tried to avoid cages...

Art
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Old March 1, 2007, 03:57 PM   #30
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Well said Art.
Cowboys have been catching mustangs and breaking them. I know it is not exactly the same as wild elephants but similar.

I don't think the way the average American thinks is evolved. I think it is declined. Some Hollywood version of right and wrong is fumigating the public over the media about hunting. THEY call that evolved or enlightened.

To hunt is one of our deepest primordial instincts. THEY still eat without questioning how that animal died.

I agree that deer and elk are symbols of the great outdoors not the stock pen.

I just hope some of us remember and pass on the privilege of hunting these great icons of the American outdoors, and fight to keep it available.
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Old March 2, 2007, 03:20 PM   #31
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That said a neighbour of mine found a baby antelope once that was apparently abandoned took it home and fed it and took care of it and it thought it was a dog for the longest time. It slept on the front step with the dog and played with the kids and everything. I guess it nearly broke the little guys heart when they took him for a drive in the old truck and had to release him back into the wild.
This unfortunate antelope likely died soon after release. Though animals are born with many basic instincts, they learn a lot from the parentsjust as we do..such as what a "danger / threat" is, what to do when threatened, what's good to eat / what is poison, appropriate fear of humans, etc. Wild animals can be raised domestically and turned to natural habitat to thrive, but only if done carefully by an experienced professional. It is most likely that this animal either wasted and died, or immediately picked off by a predator. Your best action if you think you have found an abandoned wild animal, as hard as it may be to do, is to leave it alone and let nature take its course right away....its mother may actually be nearby out of your sight anyway.
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Old March 15, 2007, 10:38 PM   #32
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Well, I don't have any deer roping stories, but I did try to tackle one once... I grew up in the country as an only child--it made for some real creative thinking for entertainment at times.

So there I was, laying out on a limb of a really big ponderosa pine, figuring uot what else to do for the afternoon that might get me killed... When all of a sudden, a muley doe walked right under me on the game trail below and stopped. She could smell me but couldn't figure out where I was--probably because us humans don't normally hang out in trees. Well, that answered my quest for something that might get me killed. So I rolled off the branch, dropping about 10 feet to the ground, grabbing the doe around the neck as I landed. What a brilliant decision! A lesser idiot would have let go after the doe bolted and kicked the snot out of them. An even lesser idiot than that would have just stayed on the limb and thought "cool, I could jump on that deer like a cougar if I really wanted to..."---and then NOT try. Me? I hang on till I got bounced off a couple trees, stomped into the dirt in the worst way, and then lost the battle between me and a big rock. And the topper for my redneck heritage---my first thought after was NOT "wow, that was really dumb". It was "Man, it sucks nobody saw that, now nobody is gonna believe it!"

Yah, I had an interesting childhood...
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Old March 15, 2007, 11:12 PM   #33
rem33
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Good story Rangefinder,

I bought a old trapping book when I was young that shows lots traps that would no way be legal in todays world. One is a rope noose type of setup, affixed to a bent over sapling as a sling kinda to snag a deer by the leg and hold it till you return.
I always thought that was interesting but never tried it.
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Old March 16, 2007, 11:10 AM   #34
Art Eatman
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Rangefinder, you're obviously a member in good standing of the "Hold my beer and watch this!" club.

Better to be your driver than your passenger.

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Old March 16, 2007, 11:46 AM   #35
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So Art, do I get bonus qualifier points for my "Punching a Moose" story? How about kicking a black bear--got one of those too! Yah, I'm secure in my "hold my beer and watch this" status---use to be anyway. I'm not quite the immortal little rubber-person I use to be. Decided a Darwin Award wasn't really a goal I wanted to achieve... LOL
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Old March 16, 2007, 12:53 PM   #36
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How about "Here's your sign?"
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Old March 16, 2007, 01:03 PM   #37
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Naw, I think in my younger years it would have been more like "here, guard my billboard...".
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