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Old January 19, 2007, 09:07 PM   #1
Shane Tuttle
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Primer flashhole irregularity

O.K. bear with me:
I happened to look down inside of my new Federal .40 S&W brass. I see what looks like the primer flash hole is "peeled back". Kinda looks like they "punch" the hole, leaving the leftover metal, well, peeled back. Looks like rose petals.
My question is:
Is it best to leave that, or do I deburr it?
I've deburred those in the past on other cartridges, believing that it interferes with uniform ignition of the powder.
Anybody have some input on this matter?
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Old January 19, 2007, 09:22 PM   #2
Trapper L
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That's how the flash hole gets installed- they punch it thru. Lyman makes a flash hole deburring tool that costs under $10.00. It's a no brainer to use and will straighten up the burrs pretty quick. For most handloading, the flash holes aren't a big issue. If you are having accuracy issues or looking for better accuracy, flash holes CAN make a difference. Sometimes it's worth the work and sometimes there isn't any difference.
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Old January 19, 2007, 09:35 PM   #3
Shane Tuttle
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Maybe not worth it on pistol, but well worth the time on rifle?
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Old January 19, 2007, 11:11 PM   #4
from the Hip
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I do trim the flash hole on my .308 win cases. It will help with consistency. I do not bother with pistol cases or some of my other rifles case that I am not fussy about. I use a modified #2 ctr drill. I believe the Lyman tool is a #2 center drill that can be purchased from any industrial supply for $5-$10. If you were to deburr the inside well and barley kiss the primer side you would end up with an hour glass cross section with both angles being 30deg per side. I hope this helps.
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Old January 19, 2007, 11:29 PM   #5
Shane Tuttle
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From the Hip,
You bet it does.
Do you mean a #2 drill bit? I have access at work for those if that's what you mean. But, they have a 140 degree angle. Any different?
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Old January 19, 2007, 11:56 PM   #6
flutedchamber
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The #2 center drill is not the same as a #2 drill. A center drill is shorter and usually double ended with a 60 degree included angle (30 degrees each side).
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Old January 20, 2007, 12:05 AM   #7
Shane Tuttle
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Thanks,
I'll be checking on Midway for one soon. Man, I love that site.
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