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Old January 8, 2007, 10:41 PM   #1
Doug.38PR
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Where is a good place for hunting bear with a rifle?

I know next to nothing about hunting. Never saw much interest in deer hunting. I would rather hunt something bigger (something that can conceivably hurt you, rather than a harmless deer). I know in many states bear hunting, certain kind of bear anyway, is illegal. But where can you go, besides up in Alaska, to hunt down large bear in the wilderness? Thinking about a vacation this summer.
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Old January 9, 2007, 02:55 AM   #2
skeeter1
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Thinking about a vacation this summer.
Doug-- Pennsylvania is a good place to hunt black bear, but I don't think they have hunting in the summer. You'd have to wait until late fall.
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Old January 9, 2007, 03:08 AM   #3
stevelyn
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I suggest picking a handful of western states you'd like to visit and research their game regs and season and make your decision from there.

Summer isn't likely going to be a very good bear hunting time since most hunting seasons are either in the spring or fall.

Alaska is the only state I'm aware of that allows bear hunting (black bear) during the summer. Black bear hunting is open nearly year round in most GMUs with a limit of three a year.

However, most of us hunt early spring or late fall for blacks as hunting during the winter wouldn't do you any good. Hunting during the summer is out because likely they're too fishy and their fur too scraggly.

If human habitation is within a days walk, they've probably been dumpster/dump digging.
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Old January 9, 2007, 05:33 AM   #4
Fremmer
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I know next to nothing about hunting.
You might want to start with a deer, then. The bear hunt sounds exciting, but you can learn a lot from deer hunting.

But hey, you have to start learning somewhere, right? I'd check into booking a guided hunt for a bear, hopefully in a State that is not too far away. You'll probably learn a lot from the guide. That would make a great vacation!

Last edited by Fremmer; January 9, 2007 at 10:20 AM. Reason: Too early.
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Old January 9, 2007, 11:28 AM   #5
roy reali
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Be Careful

Hunting a bear with a rifle can be dangerous. Make sure you get the first shot in.
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Old January 9, 2007, 02:19 PM   #6
NRA4life
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Washington's bear season begins August 1st. Can't use bait or dogs though.
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Old January 9, 2007, 02:35 PM   #7
Doug.38PR
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Hunting a bear with a rifle can be dangerous. Make sure you get the first shot in
More dangerous than a bow and arrow? Plus I'll be sure I'll have my 6 inch Highway Patrolman loaded with HEAVY magnums on my side
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Old January 9, 2007, 03:05 PM   #8
azredhawk44
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Hunting a bear with a rifle can be dangerous. Make sure you get the first shot in
Doug, I think he meant:

Quote:
Hunting "a bear with a rifle" can be dangerous.
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Old January 9, 2007, 04:46 PM   #9
jhgreasemonkey
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Washington's bear season begins August 1st. Can't use bait or dogs though.
The bear hunting success rate here in wa is too low. And there arent many densely populated areas. They are spread pretty thin in most areas. Becuase there is a ton of forest land for them to live and roam you dont often see them. I have been to alaska and canada where the bear population in some areas is much more dense. Like Sitka for example has one of the most dense populations of brown bear. I would love to hunt there.
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Old January 9, 2007, 05:33 PM   #10
Doug.38PR
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Hunting a bear with a rifle can be dangerous. Make sure you get the first shot in
Quote:
Hunting "a bear with a rifle" can be dangerous.
LOL Sorry, I missed the
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Old January 9, 2007, 07:54 PM   #11
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Bears usually use something in the ballpark of a .45-70 Govt. You can avoid their return fire simply by stepping up to a .325 WSM and staying out of their effective range.
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Old January 9, 2007, 08:40 PM   #12
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I would rather hunt something bigger (something that can conceivably hurt you, rather than a harmless deer).
If we're talking hand-to-paw combat (as it were)... well, then you got a point, sir!

But frankly, how does this come in to play when we're talking shooting animals with rifles from a distance? There's not a thing wrong with hunting with such a method, but doing so essentially negates the variable you mention. Certainly, a dangerous encounter with a bear is possible.

Most people start with small game and migrate towards medium game/deer, and so on. As others have mentioned there are numerous lessons learned in the process. I still squirrel hunt religiously. Not glamorous, but it's darn fun.

In fact, you might just enjoy hunting non-dangerous game simply due to the satisfaction involved with being successful in obtaining your quarry. Not to mention it's tasty! I say this while I snack on my venison sausage.

Here's what 350lbs of venison sausage looks like just after casing it! Hopefully this will motivate you!
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Old January 9, 2007, 11:47 PM   #13
intruder
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book a guide hunt

Maine has a lot of outfitters that have baited bear hunts starting in august going into september. Since you do not have a lot of hunting experience this is the way to go.

Best laugh I ever had was when two Texan came to Pa to hunt bear with me. They had on cowboy boots with nice leather smooth slippery soles. Well it snow the night before. When I started hiking then up the snow cover ridges of Potter county. They we're on their butts every couple of steps Laugh my butt off. Morale of the story if you don't know what your doing learn from people who do know
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Old January 10, 2007, 02:13 AM   #14
Rich636
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Do people eat bear meat or is it just hunted for it's hide? If it is edible what does it taste like? Curious Texan here
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Old January 10, 2007, 04:40 AM   #15
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Oh by the way...

Don't underestimate your game animals. Deer are FAR from harmless--they can and WILL attack, given the proper circumstances.

And, if you decide to hunt bear, I'd take something a bit heavier than a .357 as a backup gun--a .44 Mag loaded with 300 grain Garrett Hammerheads would probably be the lightest I'd carry.
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Old January 10, 2007, 05:14 PM   #16
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If it is edible what does it taste like?
I like bear meat. The secret is to remove all the fat before cooking. Backstrap steaks on the grill are tasty and a bear roast, prepared properly, tastes like a good beef pot roast.

I believe that most people who tried bear meat and didn't like it cooked some fat in with it, too. It's not the meat that is gamy and rancid tasting, it's the fat. Bear carcasses, because of the high fat content, need to be cooled off quickly.
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Old January 10, 2007, 10:00 PM   #17
Doug.38PR
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Oh by the way...

Don't underestimate your game animals. Deer are FAR from harmless--they can and WILL attack, given the proper circumstances.
Really? I know just about any animal from a alley cat to a Lion will fight if cornered with no way out.

As for deer...my dad has two cars inside of a few months almost totaled by deer that hit his car....yes that's what I mean't to say, THEY hit HIS car. He was driving on some backroad on two different occasions, once with a Saturn SL2 and another with a Chevy Blazer. Passed by a deer on both occasions on two different sides of the road and they panicked and ran into the side of the car. The plastic door on the passenger side of the Saturn was cracked with a piece missing. The steel back left door of the Blazer was completely pushed in and dented. Dad could hardly open the drivers door in the front. I don't know if this was the kind of attack you had in mind, but it shows that they make good living torpedos.

Quote:
If we're talking hand-to-paw combat (as it were)... well, then you got a point, sir!

But frankly, how does this come in to play when we're talking shooting animals with rifles from a distance? There's not a thing wrong with hunting with such a method, but doing so essentially negates the variable you mention. Certainly, a dangerous encounter with a bear is possible.
It's not the danger of fighting a bear that I mean (I am no Davy Crockett with a bowie knife ) To me, killing a deer is like shooting a cow (but I do understand the need for population control in hunting them...just not my interest). It's a harmless animal that minds it's own business and would do you no harm. Lions, Tigers, Bears and Ohmys are predators, things that kill livestock as well as hunt and kill people (true most predators typically don't go after people unless you them, but there are exceptions, such as the incident portrayed in the movie Ghost in the Darkness). Such an animal is something worth hunting to me and it does entail a lot more of a risk than sitting around waiting for a deer or gazelle to wander by.


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And, if you decide to hunt bear, I'd take something a bit heavier than a .357 as a backup gun--a .44 Mag loaded with 300 grain Garrett Hammerheads would probably be the lightest I'd carry.
I do have a Ruger Super Blackhawk .44 Magnum with a 10 inch barrel...but that is a little long a barrel for a defense sidearm and I'd prefer a double action gun. The 6 inch S&W M-28 Highway Patrolman loaded with Buffalo Bore 180 gr. Heavy Magnums is the best I can do with my collection. http://www.gunblast.com/MilesFortis-...uffaloBore.htm Here is an article about said round. I've fired it....it is vicious to say the least.
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Old January 10, 2007, 11:45 PM   #18
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This really isn't meant toward you doug, but you said something that made me want to post. Just the way you related deer hunting to shooting a cow.

Some people against hunting say, "Why hunt, you can just buy your steak at the store. You don't need to kill something."

I don't know how to describe it right now, but there's something good to be said about a person who can go out, do the deed, cook it, eat it and be fine with him/herself. People making the above statement seem to be in denial that something did in fact die for them to eat. They just paid someone else to do it... my point... I dunno... At least we (who hunt) have the guts to face the animal. Does this make sense to anyone else?
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Old January 11, 2007, 12:37 AM   #19
Rich636
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Yeah Tom, it's the ultimate in "free range". I think it's most ethical to let something live a normal life until the moment you harvest it, rather then keep it in an overcrowded cage or fenced in it's whole life.
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Old January 11, 2007, 01:13 AM   #20
Doug.38PR
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I don't know how to describe it right now, but there's something good to be said about a person who can go out, do the deed, cook it, eat it and be fine with him/herself. People making the above statement seem to be in denial that something did in fact die for them to eat. They just paid someone else to do it... my point... I dunno... At least we (who hunt) have the guts to face the animal. Does this make sense to anyone else?
Tom
OH absolutely it does. We do tend to take a lot for granted these days in our age of modernity. We have this mindset that milk comes from a carton. Steak comes from the butcher's counter, fruits and vegetables come from the produce section. We don't stop and realize the hard work, effort and patience it takes to bring all these things to market. It's got to be grown, picked, slaughtered, killed skinned. And a man who goes out and starts from square one with it all...is more in touch with reality and creation. It's has a more sense of accomplishment than driving around the corner to Randalls and pushing a shopping cart around
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