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Old October 2, 2006, 08:31 PM   #1
clayking
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Rainier Bullets

I am interested in testing some of these bullets. Their web site says to load them the same as lead cast. Anyone have any experience with them, good, bad, indifferent. I usually shoot lead but in my Ruger Blackhawk Convertible, they say to not use lead in the 9mm cylinder, due to possible slicing of the lead. I am considering loading some of the Rainier bullets for the task? Comments..........ck
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Old October 2, 2006, 10:10 PM   #2
solvability
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I shoot them a good bit - 9/40/45 - I get better results with jacketed bullets for the most part, but for economy and range practice they are just fine. The copper is thick enough to prevent leading, but not very thick - do not think of them as jacketed or use if jacketed are required.

If you have a chrongraph you can verify velocity for the lead loads and make adjustments as indicated.
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Old October 2, 2006, 11:05 PM   #3
firechicken
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I loaded/shot my first Rainiers just a few days ago. 230gr RN in 45 ACP over 5.0gr Bullseye. I think they're a nice compromise between lead and jacketed bullets. They shoot much cleaner than lead, and the accuracy was good for my first loads with them. I already plan on buying some for my 9mm and maybe some for my 38 Special/357 Magnum loads.
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Old October 2, 2006, 11:12 PM   #4
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I went through about 8000 Rainiers this year in .40 SW.

They work very, very well. Just don't push them too fast or crimp them too hard and you'll have no problems.
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Old October 3, 2006, 01:31 AM   #5
Johnny Guest
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I like them

I've been loading Ranier .45 ACP bullets -- 230 gr RN with 5.3 gr. of 231 -- for the past several years. They run fine in Colt Officer's ACP, Commanders, Government Models, Kimber 5", and a Thompson SMG. I especially appreciate them in the latter. Way less money than FMJ but they still keep lead deposits out of the Cutts Compensator.

Best,
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Old October 3, 2006, 08:17 AM   #6
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Rainiers are great. For 9mm I've been using IMI military pulldowns from GIBrass. Looks like they still have some 115gr FMJ for a good price.
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Old October 3, 2006, 11:14 AM   #7
JoeHatley
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Great bullets. I've been shooting an average of 1k/month for several years in .38 and .45 calibers.

I love 'um!!!

Joe
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Old October 3, 2006, 07:09 PM   #8
clayking
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Does everyone use "lead Load" recipes for them, like Rainier recommends?...............ck
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Old October 3, 2006, 07:24 PM   #9
NavahoJoe
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rainier bullets

Newbie question about rainier bullets. I have a couple of boxes for my .45acp in 230 gr. I just recently accuired a New Model Blackhawk Ruger Convertible, in .45 LC/.45 ACP. What kind of crimp should I put on these bullets to shoot in the Blackhawk? I have been lurking around here for a couple of months and finally registered tonight.

Thanks for your interest and replies
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Old October 3, 2006, 07:28 PM   #10
Lycanthrope
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I use loads close to lead. Maybe a tenth more.

You can crimp these bullets, but the plating is very thin. If you cut into the plate you can have separation and the bullets may become unstable. I use a crimp of .470 in .45 ACP.
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Old October 3, 2006, 07:34 PM   #11
gwalchmai
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Joe, are you loading them in ACP or LC cases? Either way, just use a taper crimp. I've loaded them in .45LC cases with a .468 taper crimp and a Lee Factory Crimp die and they work fine over 6.0gr of Titegroup.
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Old October 3, 2006, 07:54 PM   #12
NavahoJoe
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Rainier Bullets

Loading in .45 acp brass. Another reloader advised a roll crimp, but my dies have a taper crimp. Was wondering if the taper crimp would hold up to recoil in the Blackhawk.
Thanks,
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Old October 3, 2006, 08:10 PM   #13
gwalchmai
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Roll crimping plated bullets is not advised because it'll cut through the plating.

According to Rainier:

"Q4. What type of crimp should I use?

A. A slight taper crimp is what we recommend. Lee Factory Crimp Die. "
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Old October 3, 2006, 08:54 PM   #14
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With .45 ACP recoil I wouldn't expect the bullets to work forward. Mine don't show setback after chambering with RCBS dies.
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Old October 3, 2006, 09:11 PM   #15
NavahoJoe
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Rainier Bullets

Thanks for the replies.
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Old October 3, 2006, 10:20 PM   #16
clayking
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I load .45acp's for another revolver, and I simply crimped then until they easily slipped and seated into the cylinder. About .470 crimp also. They also feed well in my 1911...................ck
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Old October 4, 2006, 11:21 AM   #17
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Does anybody have a preferance between Berry's and Ranier or are they about the same?
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Old October 4, 2006, 11:43 AM   #18
azredhawk44
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I've shot both and I favor Berry's.

They seem to be thicker plated, IMO. And they are less expensive.
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Old October 4, 2006, 11:44 AM   #19
gwalchmai
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I like Rainiers better. The surface is a lot smoother.
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Old October 5, 2006, 09:38 PM   #20
alexander hamilton
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just how fast can they go and what happens if you go too fast? i have a load i have been working up waiting for me right now. in .40 i worked up to 9.0 grains of power pistol behind 135gr rainiers. i intend to try it once i have verified the lighter loads. at high speeds do you just loose accuracy?
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Old October 6, 2006, 05:52 AM   #21
gwalchmai
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I think the plating strips off and yes, the accuracy suffers.
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Old October 6, 2006, 07:39 AM   #22
Lycanthrope
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Quote:
I think the plating strips off and yes, the accuracy suffers.
Yes, that's been my experience in high pressure cartridges. Moderate loads seem to be fine though.
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Old October 8, 2006, 06:25 PM   #23
shadowwodahs
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Bullets

Have you looked at Zero bullets? They are cheaper than Rainier, Montana Gold or anything else I can find. Quality is very good and I find them accurate enough for self defense (I can keep them all in the black), and target practice. If you ever plan on shooting competition, stick with Serria bullets, they are the best - but pricey.
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Old October 8, 2006, 09:13 PM   #24
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Please post your source for Zeros. I've never seen them cheaper than plated in my neck of the woods.
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Old October 8, 2006, 09:19 PM   #25
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About a year ago Zero had a big sale on Rainier 230s - about $48/1000 delivered IIRC. I still have a couple thousand. At that time their 230gr jacketed were close to $80. Probably worth it, as they are really good bullets (and a great company) but I can't imagine Zero jacketed selling for less than plated Rainiers.

I'll buy some in a skinny minute if they are, though.
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