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Old September 16, 2006, 06:13 PM   #1
longshank
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Cooper Rifles Worth The Money?

I have an opportunity to buy a Cooper rifle in Ruger 204 for $1,350. Are these rifles worth the extra money?
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Old September 16, 2006, 09:12 PM   #2
atblis
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I think so

despite the fact they are out of my price range.

They shoot darn nice
and also
look darn nice
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Old September 17, 2006, 05:43 AM   #3
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Cooper rifles are winners, though they won't shoot enough better than a carefully bedded Remington to justify the difference in cost to me. The pleasure of ownership and oogle-factor at the shooting range or among your shooting buddies may be worth the price, if that is important to some people. Frankly, I'd be very uncomfortable deer hunting with that expensive and nicely finished rifle.

If someone is determined to have about the nicest, best-shooting factory rifle, and due to personal wealth, the price isn't an issue, I say go for it! Don't think I haven't considered one. If I didn't have a beautiful and great-shooting Rem 504, I'd still be considering a Cooper rimfire.

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Old September 17, 2006, 09:27 AM   #4
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Hey Picher, how good does your 504 shoot, and with what ammo types? Is it more accurate than a CZ 452, or can you tell? Thanks. Sorry for brief thread drift.
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Old September 17, 2006, 10:32 AM   #5
longshank
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Thanks

I agree on hunting with a fine wood stock rifle. I am opting for the Phoenix model which features the Kevlar stock. It has really nice look and impervious to the elements. Thanks to all for the comments and feedback. This should be a good rifle for the coyotes we have on my farm as well as those West Texas prairie dog towns. I also have a Rock River AR-15 in 223, but you can never have too many guns and I am intrigued by the allure of the 204, whether it is a Cooper or another.
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Old September 17, 2006, 11:07 AM   #6
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Friend of mine occasionally sends me pics of groups shot from his Cooper rifles. The groups speak for themselves, and they're down in benchrest-quality range...substantially better than the low 2's that my Remington VS "properly bedded" shoots.
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Old September 17, 2006, 01:38 PM   #7
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It depends what you are looking for. The Cooper is a true sportsman's weapon.
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Old September 17, 2006, 01:56 PM   #8
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Accurate, reliable weapons are always worth the money. If you can afford one, get one.
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Old September 17, 2006, 06:15 PM   #9
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"Hey Picher, how good does your 504 shoot, and with what ammo types? Is it more accurate than a CZ 452, or can you tell? Thanks. Sorry for brief thread drift." First Freedom

Mine averages in the .3"s at 50 yards after pillar bedding, some minor firing pin raceway smoothing and pin nose re-shaping. That's with my better match ammo, of course.

I don't shoot it from the bench often any more. It's just too much fun to shoot offhand. When I miss, it's not the rifle's fault.

Compared with my CZ Varmint, it shoots better, has a much better trigger and I like the pistol grip/trigger shape/position much better. It also has better balance, due to the lighter barrel. The 452 American is more comparable to the 504, but I haven't had one of those. I think the chamber on the Remington is tighter.

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Old September 17, 2006, 09:04 PM   #10
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1st law in economics

Anything is worth what someone will give for it.
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Old September 18, 2006, 08:22 AM   #11
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Last I heard they were still backed up 9 months or more on orders depending on the model and caliber. Looks like somebody likes them.

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Old September 18, 2006, 10:58 PM   #12
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They really do work well, made as nice as anything triple the price.

As per the comment that any rem 700 just needs to be "properly bedded" to shoot accurately. This is a myth, pure and simple, If anyone could drastically improve the accuracy of 700 rem buy just doing a simple bedding job they would be millionares with the business they would do. But seeing as almost every rem 700 made in the last 10 years or so will shoot easily sub minute groups with factory ammo, it gets hard to ''dramatically" improve that rifle.

Sure, we have all seen the troubled rifle that no matter what will not shoot no matter what.

But the fact remains, that day in and day out, the rem 700 has been the most accurate out of the box production rifle. You might find some Sakos that were better, Coopers are not exactly "Production" and there may be another brand or two that comes close, but for the big box available rifles the 700 is up there.

Last year I was at the range and this guy was ripping his 700 saying it was wildly inaccurate. Another range regular and I shared a glance and offered to try his rifle. three minutes later after making sure the stock bolts were tight and the mounts and rings were screwed down tight. We settled in on the bench. The first two groups were about a foot high and slight right, but were basically one holers. Adjusting down the scope and setting it for 2 inches high at a hundred we had the guy eating crow.

Remington hirers PHD level engineers and have guys who do nothing all day but work on great rifles, I seriously doubt that some back room gun smith who started this rumor knows more about rifles than this guy.

Can you improve a Remington, yes, but is it just a simple 'properly bedding job" no, think about it.
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Old January 19, 2008, 12:47 AM   #13
25x47cooper
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hunt deer

picher, i dont know were you hunt deer but here in montana we use are coopers for what they were build for- that hunting. i have 2 one in 221 fireball and one in 25x47 ser#3 of 10 ever built. i have shot 2 of the biggest mule deer i have ever shot both with the 25x47 and i have the pics if you would like to see them.
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Old January 19, 2008, 08:50 AM   #14
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"picher, i dont know were you hunt deer but here in montana we use are coopers for what they were build for- that hunting. i have 2 one in 221 fireball and one in 25x47 ser#3 of 10 ever built. i have shot 2 of the biggest mule deer i have ever shot both with the 25x47 and i have the pics if you would like to see them."

You may have gotten the wrong impression. I think Cooper rifles are very nicely made and fantastic shooters. Here in Maine, we hunt in some pretty bad conditions, so I'm not as comfortable with taking a beautiful and expensive rifle like a Cooper deer hunting. We're likely to encounter wet, cold, and snowy conditions about any day we hunt.

Last season, my Rem 700 Stainless, .270 Win, in a Sendero (take-off) stock was used by three people who managed to kill two deer in some pretty cold, snowy, and/or rainy conditions. Their wooden-stocked, blued rifles stayed home. I felt comfortable lending that rifle to friends after shooting my deer.

It's got an Acraglas skimcoat to perfectly mate the action to bedding block.
She downright shoots. At 450 yards, with hot 130 grain handloads, in some pretty severe mirage, it shot two, 3 1/2", 3-shot groups. It never changes POI due to weather, either. That's good enough for me.

I shot my own deer in cold temps and moderate wind (15-18* f), with a quick shot through the heart at 237 yards as it briskly walked across a narrow snowmobile trail in the softwoods. Fortunately, I was sitting in a home-made blind with a 2x4" railing for a rest. A Cooper couldn't have killed it any better, but sure would have looked pretty in a picture.

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Old January 19, 2008, 02:55 PM   #15
deadasslast2004
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some pics are worth a 1000 bucks



This is my Cooper test target from the factory. 3 shot group 140 graiin bullets in a Cooper 6.5x285 rifle.

You will have to decide if you really want a $1000.00 rifle that shoots this good.
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Old January 19, 2008, 09:27 PM   #16
stinger
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Quote:
It depends what you are looking for. The Cooper is a true sportsman's weapon.
So those of us who can't afford Cooper's aren't true sportsmen? Relax, I know what you mean. They are extremely well made and almost works of art.

They shoot pretty well, also.
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Old January 19, 2008, 09:44 PM   #17
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Quote:
Are these rifles worth the extra money?
Looking online I see the Remington 700 VS SF II as the most expensive non-custom shop 700 at $975.



Also see this Model 21 Cooper .223 at $1050. One of the least expensive I could find.


Looking at these two I would say the Cooper is worth $75 more than a regular production 700. Not knocking Remington since I have bought 5 of their varmint/tactical models and all have been great shooters. But if I were to spend a grand or more on a rifle the Cooper looks pretty good. Or to put it another way how much would it cost to restock a 700 with wood equivalent to a Cooper? Several hundred dollars at least.
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Old January 20, 2008, 08:04 AM   #18
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Actually, Coopers are a bargain at that price...but don't tell the company!

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Old January 20, 2008, 09:16 AM   #19
VonFireball
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Quote:
As per the comment that any rem 700 just needs to be "properly bedded" to shoot accurately. This is a myth, pure and simple, If anyone could drastically improve the accuracy of 700 rem buy just doing a simple bedding job they would be millionares with the business they would do. But seeing as almost every rem 700 made in the last 10 years or so will shoot easily sub minute groups with factory ammo, it gets hard to ''dramatically" improve that rifle.

Sure, we have all seen the troubled rifle that no matter what will not shoot no matter what.

But the fact remains, that day in and day out, the rem 700 has been the most accurate out of the box production rifle. You might find some Sakos that were better, Coopers are not exactly "Production" and there may be another brand or two that comes close, but for the big box available rifles the 700 is up there.


???????

Totally disagree.

Virtually every wood stocked remington 700 I have laid my hands on needed some sort of tweak before it was right. I wouldn't sell someone a brand new rifle that isn't even bedded or floated properly. This is why I say "savage" rather than "remington" for out of box accuracy questions.

Just floated the barrel on a 700 adl last week.

Perhaps the synthetic stocks are better, but as far as wood is concerned they ain't no out of box rifle. With the extra money remington wants they should be more accurate out of box. Unfortunately savage has em beat badly right now.
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Old January 20, 2008, 01:59 PM   #20
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The law of diminishing strongly affects custom firearms.
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Old January 20, 2008, 09:07 PM   #21
Reyn
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Arent most Coopers single shots?
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Old January 20, 2008, 09:12 PM   #22
Chuck Graber
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"Aren't most Coopers single shots?"

Aren't most kills single shots?
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Old January 28, 2008, 10:13 PM   #23
Coopersrcool
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I am a little partial to Coopers
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Old January 28, 2008, 11:11 PM   #24
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Nice, seriously considering one for my next rifle, just got to figure out exactly what I want.
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Old January 29, 2008, 12:08 PM   #25
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Gorgeous rifles, I love a nicely figured wood stock. As far as hunting with blued, wood stocked rifles, I've done that all my life. I would put any of my rifles up against anyone's for condition or looks. Take care of them and touch up any scratches and they are good for life.

Stainless and plastic are easier to take care of, but not better. And they are ugly to begin with so a scratch just looks like it belongs there.:barf:

I come from an era where craftsmanship was valued and any rifle could be improved with TLC and skill. The Coopers don't seem to need improvement and that price is commensurate with the quality of the piece.

A good oil finish is easy to touch up and easy to apply. I refinish all of my rifles, usually before shooting them. Check the bedding, polish the trigger, deburr all metal and make sure of fitting on all components. Makes any rifle look, and shoot better.
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