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Old March 14, 2009, 02:16 PM   #51
Citizen Carrier
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I use brake or carb cleaner to routinely clean guns.

And those chemicals smell remarkably similar to something like Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber" or other similar spray cleaners you find at gun shops.

I suspect they are near chemically identical. They are not identical in price though.

Just make sure you remove any plastic or wood grips or the stock if it is a rifle you are cleaning. Most "gun cleaners" stipulate doing that as well.

That's one thing I like about the Rugers. Aside from the grips, everything else on the gun is metal. No plastics.

Until I switched to the Pardini match pistol, I used a Ruger Mk II "slabsides" extensively in weekly rimfire bullseye matches. This was the method I used to clean them and I never had a "dirt related" misfire or jam.

I believe I first encountered the "brake cleaner" suggestion years ago when reading an article in "Gun Tests" about the Ruger guns. That was how the staff of that magazine cleaned their Rugers.

In my experience, and this is with both Mk II and III pistols, the only recurring problem was what I call "The Ruger Stovepipe". What would happen is that an extracted case would impact the left lip of the magazine before it hit the ejector. This would cause the spent case to tumble in the action and lodge. The case would be sticking open end out with the rimmed base still in the action with the bolt closing on it.

I had this happen on both my II and III pistols and I witnessed it in my friend's Mk II as well.

It was an easy fix. I just put the magazines in a vice and carefully removed small amounts of metal from the left magazine lip. Then I chambered a round, and watched as I slowly pulled the bolt back to extract it. When I could see enough metal had been removed to insure the case would always hit the ejector and never the magazine, the pistol worked 100% save the occasional dud round commonly encountered with .22 rimfire ammunition.
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Old March 14, 2009, 03:11 PM   #52
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To clear it up... My total disassembly was due to me getting rid of mag safety, and once that far in I decided to go ahead and do the total thing to familiarize my self with the gem.
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Old March 14, 2009, 04:55 PM   #53
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Quote:
I use brake or carb cleaner to routinely clean guns.

And those chemicals smell remarkably similar to something like Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber" or other similar spray cleaners you find at gun shops.

I suspect they are near chemically identical. They are not identical in price though.
Wouldn't be a bit surprised. I figured that Mobil 1 or something would do the job just as good as special gun oils too, at a tiny fraction of the cost.


Quote:
In my experience, and this is with both Mk II and III pistols, the only recurring problem was what I call "The Ruger Stovepipe". What would happen is that an extracted case would impact the left lip of the magazine before it hit the ejector. This would cause the spent case to tumble in the action and lodge. The case would be sticking open end out with the rimmed base still in the action with the bolt closing on it.
Ha! That is exactly what was happening with the one mag, the mag I was planning to return to Ruger, but haven't yet. I guess I'll go ahead and return it anyway. Should I order a spare mag from them while I'm at it, or is there a better place to get them?

I've had relatively little experience with .22's, though I have a S & W 617. What's the best way to clean the barrel? The rods they sell for .22's, when you slip a piece of patch on them, it makes for a very tight fit.
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Old March 14, 2009, 10:49 PM   #54
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Always a good idea to have extra magazines, but like I said, the Ruger Stovepipe can be corrected easily at the workbench and the gun will function perfectly afterwards.

My prefered method of cleaning .22 pistol barrels is to get a coated cable pull-through such as the ones made for cleaning AR15 rifles.

I push the cable through the barrel, from the muzzle to the breech with the eyelet piece on. Then I put a .22 patch in the eyelet and pull the cable back through the barrel.

You don't have to disassemble the pistol to do it this way and there is no rod section rubbing up against the crown of the muzzle wearing it down.
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Old March 14, 2009, 11:36 PM   #55
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I wouldn't consider doing it myself. Good basic cleaning without a tear down is really all you need to do with that pistol, IMO.
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Old March 15, 2009, 09:39 AM   #56
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"I wouldn't consider doing it myself. Good basic cleaning..."

What do you mean by good basic cleaning, following the Ruger instructions to take the thing apart, as opposed to what Mr Hogdog did once, or CC's method?

CC, you're the expert!
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Old March 15, 2009, 09:42 AM   #57
Masada
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My wife has one of these pistols.

We stop after initial disassembly -- we NEVER get to the rubber mallet stage.

Yes, putting it back together is a bit tricky. There's a video on the Ruger website that explains it. Once you get the hang of it, it's a snap.
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Old March 15, 2009, 10:19 AM   #58
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Always used carb cleaner in the army for cleaning m16's and the m60's.It gets the carbon buildup off,just what it was made to do.
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Old March 15, 2009, 04:32 PM   #59
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He probably was referring to modifying the magazine so it doesn't cause stovepipes. That was what he wouldn't do himself, if I understand correctly.

Back when I modified mine, there was a website with photos on how another guy modified his. The thing is that you only remove enough metal from the left lip so that cases hit the ejector and not the lip.

I don't know that I'm an expert, but I've modified at least 4 Rugers that I can remember with upgraded aftermarket parts. After the first one, the rest were easy. I was able to install a VQ sear on the last two with just my fingers and in a matter of minutes.

That's why I don't understand why people complain about the complexity of these pistols and their quirks.
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Old March 15, 2009, 04:57 PM   #60
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CC, How many of these mags need trimmed? I have never had a single stovepipe with my 2 mags and my father's MKI was a jewel as well and he never tried a disassembly.
Brent
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Old March 15, 2009, 06:01 PM   #61
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That's the thing.

It apparently doesn't happen to everybody. My Mk II would routinely have this stovepipe problem, as did a friend of mine using an identical "slabsides" target model. Depending on the magazine, it would happen once every 30 shots or so. Maybe more often than that even.

As I was using the gun for bullseye competition, those jams were costing me scores and causing delays in the matches because I would have to refire.

So I went ahead and modified all six or so of the magazines I'd accumulated just to be on the safe side.

The website where I learned of this problem also suggested the plastic magazine base could be worn or ground down so the magazine "sat lower" in the pistol against the heel magazine release. This was an alternative to grinding down the left mag lip slightly. My way worked just fine for me.

If you aren't experiencing the Ruger Stovepipe, then it isn't a concern.
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Old March 16, 2009, 12:43 AM   #62
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Ruger stovepipe: It was occurring about every other round with one mag. The other mag seemed to work OK. Possibly the bad mag was the one that got jammed in my gun during my first attempt at disassembly. Maybe the gunsmith damaged it when he removed it, or maybe it jammed because it was damaged in the first place. Anyway, I'll send it back to Ruger and let them replace it under warranty, and maybe I can order an additional mag or two from them while I'm at it and they won't charge me any postage.
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Old March 16, 2009, 12:47 AM   #63
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Quote:
My wife has one of these pistols.

We stop after initial disassembly -- we NEVER get to the rubber mallet stage.

Yes, putting it back together is a bit tricky. There's a video on the Ruger website that explains it. Once you get the hang of it, it's a snap.

Well, again, by initial disassembly you must mean removing the lock mechanism etc. a la the Ruger instructions, and this operation, when the gun is new and tight, is what requires the rubber/wooden mallet and dowel in order to bang out the pin - and then bang it back in again.
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Old March 18, 2009, 01:04 AM   #64
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delete D/P. APOLOGIES!!!!
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Old March 18, 2009, 01:07 AM   #65
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I must be as lucky as Mr. CC. I`ve done far less cleaning my MK1. This gun has literally been abused. Don`t know how many thous. of rds. to date. Myself, kids and now grandkids. To-date gun has never been completely broken down. Barrel swabbed, feeding ramp(area) and mags cleaned. Gun blown out with compressed air and completely oiled with a LIGHT OIL. Have never had a problem in years of service other than with cheap Phillipine, Korean ,middle East ammo. Gun still fired but I stopped due to sandy/gritty feeling in chamber and slide. If your having stovepipe issues a cleaning or replacement of your mags may be in order
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Old April 4, 2010, 09:05 PM   #66
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I really need help

This thread was 6 pages long but i'm pretty boned here.. I'm going shooting wednesday and i tried disassembling my Ruger 22/45 MArk III Hunter and I'm STUMPED. I couldnt get the level OUT off the back of the gun.. I got it up... yanked and tugged and nothing happened so i put it back down and tried to cock my bolt back normally and the thing only goes half way back... and now i cant get the lever back... I really need help people thanks so much!
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Old September 10, 2010, 01:58 PM   #67
chb1764
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mk3

took my mk3 apart using book no big deal putting back together seem to go ok a little stif ( its new ) now nothing works slide very stif trigger not working magazine eject not working worst of all I can not even get it apart again can someone help Chris
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Old June 16, 2012, 09:00 PM   #68
desertmatt
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Sear spring got around sear when milling

I must thank Scorch for mentioning the sear spring. Until you have taken this gun completely apart, studying how each piece operates like an old Swiss clock maker, you will have trouble identifying problems.

In my case, I bought a Mark III 22/45 despite *hating* the thin grip. I once owned a Mark II 22/45 that I both loved (shooting) and hated (assembling). Apparently later 22/45 models have removable grip panels, but not mine. Anyway, I removed them...with a milling machine. Then I carved some really thick wooden ones (I have big meaty hands), decorated the wood, and gorilla glued them on. Then I happily assembled the finished product, pulled back on the bolt, released the bolt so it should be cocked, pulled the trigger...and no "click". Nuts!

I guess the bowing of the frame from the mill vise (and some reckless abuse I will not admit to) allowed the sear spring to get past the sear. I would have lost all hope if not for the websites others mentioned (and I repeat here):
http://www.guntalk-online.com/2245detailstripping.htm
http://www.guntalk-online.com/detailstrip.htm
Once I dove in, I was impressed by the design. It was easier than I could have imagined! Reset the sear spring and I was in business...click. Really, it took less than a half hour.

My question is, how did anyone ever figure stuff like this out before the internet? They must have been geniuses. Well, I think I must now be over the hump with this gun. Now I will definitely consider making some of the modifications the kids are doing to the Mark III's nowadays.

Thanks again!
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