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Old July 8, 2006, 02:56 PM   #1
Jseime
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Case Trimming- how often

I'm fairly new to reloading and i havent got a case trimmmer. So far ive only used once fired factory brass but im getting to the end of that supply and i was wondering if I should buy a case trimmer and use it every time? every other time? how often?

Also I have a new ruger M77 MKII in .270 and was wondering if i could skip the full length resizing and just go with a neck sizer die.
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Old July 8, 2006, 03:12 PM   #2
Steve in PA
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Well, a smart reloader will measure his cases after every resize so that if they are longer than the max, they can be trimmed.

Now, since I went and bought the RCBS X-Die for my M1 Garand (.30/06) and M4 Bushy (.223), all I have to do is the intial trim. I'm on my 3 or 4 go around for the M1 brass and no trimming here
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Old July 8, 2006, 03:56 PM   #3
Wildalaska
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If you use quality brasss, and neck size, you should trim after the first firing, and probably wont need to trim again...

Keep your button/inside necks lubed to reduce stretch

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Old July 8, 2006, 04:13 PM   #4
rwilson452
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Case trimming

on my 22-250 and 243 brass I trim everytime. I have the Lee case trimmer setup for all my rifle stuff. On my 30-06 I do it when necessary. I never have trimmed my 45ACP brass. My 22-250 prefers full length resized brass. my 243 is less fussy. I still trim it to insure a mouth that is square. You don't need to trim that often but I do. But like those .3 MOA or less groups.
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Old July 8, 2006, 04:24 PM   #5
Charles S
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Quote:
Keep your button/inside necks lubed to reduce stretch
Excellent advice.

Charles
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Old July 9, 2006, 07:23 AM   #6
Toolman
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I check each time I reload and I set aside the ones that need trimmed. It's amazing the variation in brass.
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Old July 9, 2006, 11:32 AM   #7
geronimo13
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I shoot .223 and always case trim initially as the once fired can be at or over the 1.760 limit. The lee trimmer knocks it down to 1.753 approx. and I don't notice much, if any, stretch (although I'm not loading to max pressures) after shooting my reloads. The variation in length varies a lot between case manufactures and even in similiar batchs. I use a dial caliper ($14@harbor freight) and do them (the free range pickup) while watching movies. Pistol cases don't need trimming BTW.
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Old July 9, 2006, 11:50 AM   #8
Tuf Toy
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"on my 22-250 and 243 brass I trim everytime. "
One could only assume that the reload life a a casing that needed to be trimmed every time must be very short. If the casing is stretching that much after every shot the wall must be thinning out severely and would quickly become an unsafe round. There is only a finite amount of brass to each casing, you have to keep cutting it ...it is coming from some where.
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Old July 9, 2006, 12:02 PM   #9
amamnn
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trimming

For uniformity (the key to accuracy) rifle brass should be at least checked after each resizing, or every other time if neck sizing. The Lee trimmers are a cheap and easy way to go for most shooters. Lubing the necks with a tiny bit mica or graphite when resizing will help extend the brass life, improve concentricity and not contaminate the powder.
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Old July 9, 2006, 03:58 PM   #10
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You need to invest in a quality micrometer AND a case trimmer. I would not reload without one. While you may not need to trim after every round, I would not fire a high powered rifle without knowing my case length. I've been out of reloading for a long time, and just got back into it. I would highly recomend the Lee case trimer. They are inexpensive, and VERY precise. I don't think it is possible to screw up your cases with one. If you are not sure what to get, call Midway and those guys will help you out. I just resized 60 rounds of 22-250, and really liked how it worked. Also, make sure you get a chamfer tool and primer pocket cleaner if you don't own one. That will only set you back a few bucks as well...
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Old July 9, 2006, 10:25 PM   #11
rwilson452
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trim everytime

Everytime you shoot a high pressure case and size it, it will grow a finite amount. Not enough to need trimming generally, it only polishes the mouth but it does keep it square. as I stated you don't need to trim every time but I do. As to how long a case will last there are too many variables to make an accurate prediction as to how many times it can be used. My cases start to lose accuracy before they start to fail. When they start to lose accuracy I pitch them. On a modern bottle necked case I would guessimate between 5-10 times. for a low pressure straight case such as a .45ACP, a very very long time.

One more time. I don't need to trim, I trim because I wanna do it.


One could only assume that the reload life a a casing that needed to be trimmed every time must be very short. If the casing is stretching that much after every shot the wall must be thinning out severely and would quickly become an unsafe round. There is only a finite amount of brass to each casing, you have to keep cutting it ...it is coming from some where.
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Old July 10, 2006, 05:25 PM   #12
temmi
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I trim after every sizing. I do this to keep things as uniform as possible. If this is not an issue for you should trim when you approach the Max Length of your case/caliber… NEVER EXCEED THAT LENGTH.
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Old July 12, 2006, 06:11 PM   #13
Jseime
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Thanks guys I'll pick one up this weekend when I get to the city.
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