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Old February 27, 2000, 02:58 PM   #1
Snakeman
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If you would start reloading, and you would only need to reload approx. 50-100 rounds a week, what you buy?
What brand?
Your experience would help immensly!!!!
Thanks!
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Old February 27, 2000, 03:43 PM   #2
motorep
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If I needed to load just pistol rounds I'd buy a Dillon Square Deal B. If I were going to load rifle, or a combination of both, I'd buy a Dillon 550. I've loaded 10's of thousands on both.
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Old February 27, 2000, 03:44 PM   #3
jcoyoung
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Need more specifics.

Do you have a lot of free time?
Are these for plinking or precision target shooting?
How much room do you have on your bench?
How much loot are you willing to part with?
etc, etc.

For starters, I would recommend a single stage setup. But you could always just buy a progressive and do each station one at a time (like me) until you get the hang of it.

Jason


------------------
"Ray guns don't vaporize Zorbonians, Zorbonians vaporize Zorbonians" The Far Side
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Old February 27, 2000, 03:53 PM   #4
Bud Helms
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What motorep said.
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Old February 27, 2000, 05:07 PM   #5
Desert Dog
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You asked...

Single stage press (Rockchucker), digital scale with RF communication to the trickler.

------------------
.45 Super... Fat and FAST...

"No provision in our Constitution ought to be dearer to man than that which protects the rights of conscience against the enterprises of the civil authority" - Thomas Jefferson
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Old February 27, 2000, 09:36 PM   #6
Snakeman
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I keep hearing about the Dillon 550 over and over again.
Does that mean that eventually evryone gets fed up with the single stage, or is it just one of those "I just want the best"!

Sure, money is an object, but I'm also attempting to buy something that will serve me well, but is not an overkill!
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Old February 27, 2000, 10:38 PM   #7
45acp
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you should start with a dillon 'cuz most of us end up with one...
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Old February 27, 2000, 10:48 PM   #8
killer45auto
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I`d say a dillon square deal b or the 550 .I`ve got a 1050 from dillon and love it .I am also fixing to buy the 550 also


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Old February 27, 2000, 11:11 PM   #9
jcoyoung
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If you are going to stick with pistol cartridges, the Dillon Sq Deal B would fit the bill nicely. If you plan on doing both pistol and rifle, the Dillon 550 is probably (IMHO) THE best progressive for the money.

I mentioned a single stage because they are pretty simple to operate, and most of us usually have both a single stage and a progressive. I've heard of people using the SS press for de-cap and size, and the progressive for putting the good stuff back in.
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Old February 28, 2000, 06:33 AM   #10
Cougar
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I'm going to defer any recomendations to those that know better.

I don't shoot as much as I would like, but was thinking about getting into reloading a few years ago with a buddy of mine.

He bought one of those Lee 'Anniversary Kits' for a simple single stage press. Somewhere along the line he had also picked up a Lee Turret press. We had started to acumulate the basics for getting started. He has a couple of reloading manuals (Sierra 3rd, and Lyman 47th) I got the single caliber Loadbooks, 9mm, .38 Spl/.357 Mag, and .44 Spl/Mag Lee carbide dies, and a tmmbler from Midway.

The problem is, we never did anything with it! He never got around to building a reloading station at his place, then he drifted away from the sport entirely. I ended up buying his 'share' of the reloading equipment and supplies, still new in the box, for just $100, but I too have not done anything with it yet.

Do you recommend that I have someone help me get started? I'm hesitant to do so on my own. I'm afraid that I'll screw something up. I have lots of questions as well. Should I seat and crimp in two different operations as some suggest or do I frustrate myself trying to do both at once. Should I start with the single stage press or start with the Turret press. ....Or should I scrap all of the Lee presses because it seems like no one in these forums holds them in much regard.

Any input would be greatly appreciated!
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Old February 29, 2000, 05:08 PM   #11
TheOtherMikey
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Hey snakeman, I bought a rockchucker as my first press. It is a really good single stage press. But, it is really slow. After 6 months I bought a Dillon 550B progressive press which I believe is the best progressive press on the market. I got the 550B because I figured (correctly) that I might be reloading rifle one day ( about 60 days later)

If I were to start all over knowing what I know now I would get a 550B (rather than a Square Deal B) to give me the flexability to do it all. If money is a problem, a used Dillon is a better deal than a new single stage of any manufacture.

Hope this helps, Mikey.
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Old March 1, 2000, 12:24 PM   #12
10mmrules
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I like the 550 because I can load a weeks worth of bullets in an hour, and not worry about it. I had a single stage a few years back, and it would take me an hour to load 50 now, I can load 5-600 in an hour, and it leaves me time to do other things.
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Old March 1, 2000, 08:05 PM   #13
olazul
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I have heard alot about the Dillon 650, why do you guys prefer the 550?

regards,

Olazul
 
Old March 2, 2000, 06:31 AM   #14
johnnybravo
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The 550 costs less, the caliber conversions are cheaper than the 650's. However, the 650 will crank out many more rounds per hour.
Rule of thumb on progressives is the more money you spend, the less actual time you will have to spend reloading. It's best to find a balance between available cash outlay and time. 45acp is right. Most of us do end up with a dillon...

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Old March 3, 2000, 10:38 AM   #15
Bill in NM
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I'll throw in with the Dillon crowd.
I just got back into shooting a little over a year ago. I had inherited a single stage and a turret press when my father died about 3 years ago, but hadn't done anything with them. After reading a number of forums, and other research, I purchased the Dillon RL550b. While I do use the other presses for sizing/decapping rifle rounds, EVERYTHING is loaded on the Dillon. If you do get a Dillon, you WON'T regret it.
Best of luck,

Cougar:
If you can find a reloader to help you, life will be much easier. I really wish I had gotten into sharing the hobby with my father.
Seating and crimping seperatly is MUCH easier/better IMO.

Bill

[This message has been edited by Bill in NM (edited March 03, 2000).]
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Old March 3, 2000, 05:41 PM   #16
Cougar
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Bill in NM,

Thanks for the response.

I have another friend that reloads/used to reload. I haven't seen him in several years since he got married, had kids, etc. Priorities, I guess. Even before then it was hard to hook up with him since we work different shifts, and I have to work Saturdays as well. My wife would NOT look kindly on my only day off together (sunday) was spent reloading. I guess that's my problem though. sg)
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Old March 4, 2000, 11:14 AM   #17
WalterGAII
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Cougar:

Reloading isn't rocket science. If it were rocket science, there wouldn't be so many of us near-illiterates doing it so much.

If you ever work out your "problems", you'll probably find that reloading offers you a much-needed therapeutic benefit.

Can't help you with your accountability-to-your-wife-for-your-spare-time situation, but I can recommend a great lawyer who can. He's so good, I'd almost get married again, just to see him work one more time.
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Old March 4, 2000, 08:07 PM   #18
WESHOOT2
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Start with the LEE press(es). When they break if you still think single-stage works for you buy RCBS, Lyman, Redding, or Forster/Bonanza Co-Ax. And a scale weight-check set.

If you go progressive buy Dillon, either 550 or 650.

Don't be afraid; be careful. Ask questions. And ALWAYS WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.
ALWAYS!

Sorry for shouting.

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Old March 5, 2000, 09:42 AM   #19
quadcab
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Snakeman; The LYMAN T-MAG II is a well made press which will suit your needs. I got mine from Natchez Shooters Supply as part of the Lyman Expert Kit. They frequently have it on sale. quadcab
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Old March 5, 2000, 11:57 PM   #20
Mouse Gun
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For a first time reloader, reguardless of pistol or rifle loads, I would agree with protoolman and buy the Rock Chucker kit. After you've learned what it's all about I would get into a progressive, I would definatly recommend it if you are a high volume pistol shooter.


I've been reloading about 11 years and the only progresive I own is a Hornady Apex for shotshells. I'm mainly a rifle shooter and I don't feel loading match/precision ammo on a progresive will bring out it's maximum potential. I guess this is why reloading to me is more labor than love but in my case I feel it's necessary.


Mouse Gun

[This message has been edited by Mouse Gun (edited March 05, 2000).]
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Old March 6, 2000, 12:09 AM   #21
jeepCJ
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Get a Dillon, SDB if only pistol reloading. Buy a digital scale right away, dial caliper, case gauge for each type you reload (it will make life easier) Lyman brass tumbler & some Dillon brass polish (you will be proud of how your reloads look, TAKE YOUR TIME and weigh your powder often, its easy to get carried away with a progressive reloader, ditto on the glasses! HAVE FUN
Dave
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Old March 7, 2000, 06:07 PM   #22
Mouse Gun
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I forgot to mention the glasses also, a definate MUST. I had a rifle primer go off the other night during seating and it scared the living sh** out of me. First time this has ever happened to me. This may be a no-brainer but keep your hands and face away from the case mouth when seating, I've always made a habit of wearing glasses and pointing it away from my face but it burnt the crap out of my finger and I had to take a break and change my shorts. It always happens when you least expect it. Good luck.


Brian
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Old March 7, 2000, 10:53 PM   #23
Unkel Gilbey
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Fellah's
I think that probably the most important thing to pass here is that with someone just starting out in the hobby, it's important to get the basic's down before going for volume. Therefore, I recommend a single stage reloading press, and I won't even bother to recommend a brand. It really doesn't matter which, but there are at least two schools of thought here.

1) Go cheap! (Lee - new) or second hand RCBS, and when the learning process is complete, trade it off and upgrade to a progressive.

2) Buy a Quality single stage (I prefer RCBS) and retain it for the more precision loads that aren't really possible with most of the progressives out there.

The key is that he (Snakeman) needs to learn the basics of how to make quality ammo. Learning how to adjust the dies, work up loads, fiddle with crimping methods, case resizing and care, etc, etc, etc. These are things which aren't learned overnight, and are better suited (in the learning process)for the single stage. Only after he understands what's happening with the single stage can he feel confident to make the progressive step (a little play on words there!) to cranking out a larger volume of shells with one of the more animated setups.
I have nothing against them, I just think that this sort of endeavor is best entered cautiously, and going whole hog with a newby and a multi-stage is the recipe for disaster.

Another thing that I don't think that I saw mentioned was reloading manuals. I cut my reloading teeth with a RCBS manual and a Lee loader, and now I can't seem get enough new literature related to loading. Not only is there a wealth of information on HOW, but there is plenty of WHY, WHO, and WHERE too. There is (collectively) hundreds of years of reloading experience packed into those books - and it shouldn't be ignored.

Good luck!

Unkel Gilbey
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Old March 8, 2000, 02:38 AM   #24
I shoot back
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Top three choices:
1. Dillion, 2. Dillion, or 3. Dillion!

Reasons why:
5. Best equipment out there.
4. I have called them several times and they have always provided me the information I needed and then some.
3. Equipment available for just about every caliber known to man.
2. You get what you pay for.
1. Their lifetime gurantee. I have seen and heard horror stories of people doing stupid things (like the guy who A.D.'d into his press) and they have taken care of every single one (that I know of free of charge). First hand example-I got a brand new Boxer puppy who liked to chew on electrical cords. Before I could break him of this dangerous habit he chewed up the cord on my Dillion Brass Tumbler (it was not plugged in at the time luckily.) I contacted Dillion to see how much it would cost me to replace it and they said sent it to them and they fixed it Free of charge. On a couple of other occasions I have broken parts and even though it was because of my own stupidity (if it doesn't fit, force it mindframe) I have called them and I have never had to pay for a replacement part. Someone along the line said to buy a RCBS or a Lee and when you break it consider buying something else. If you buy a DIllion you will never have to worry about buying another press unless you want to upgrade or you need an additional one.

My preference is the 550 because it was the most economical and I can do all of the rifle/pistol calibers that I own.

If I and most of the others have convinced you call Dillion and ask for Tim M. and he will square you away.
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Old March 8, 2000, 02:26 PM   #25
mudman
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mouse Gun:
For a first time reloader, reguardless of pistol or rifle loads, I would agree with protoolman and buy the Rock Chucker kit. After you've learned what it's all about I would get into a progressive, I would definatly recommend it if you are a high volume pistol shooter.


I've been reloading about 11 years and the only progresive I own is a Hornady Apex for shotshells. I'm mainly a rifle shooter and I don't feel loading match/precision ammo on a progresive will bring out it's maximum potential. I guess this is why reloading to me is more labor than love but in my case I feel it's necessary.


Mouse Gun

[This message has been edited by Mouse Gun (edited March 05, 2000).]
[/quote]

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