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Old January 22, 2000, 08:29 PM   #1
Scratch
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Alright I need some help. I'm in the market for a new progressive press. I would like to have auto indexing, five stations, and easy change of caliber. I would like to hear from people that use these presses. I would like to not from the dillonites that just say get the dillon for the waranty. I currently use a Hornady Projector and they have always treated me great waranty wise. I want to know what it is that makes you like the press.
As far as the Dillon is concerned how is the press without all the extras that they have bolted to it in the catalogs? I can't aford all that now. Also What side do you put the case in and what side does it eject from I'm a lefty.
I'm also wondering about the priming system on both of them. How do they work? The priming system on my current press could be better. I see that the new lock-n-load has a new priming system.
I would also like to know about the shell ejection system. How do these work for each of the presses? Again here is where the Projector could use some help. It works fine it just needs to be adjusted for different size cases.
One of the benefits of the Hornady is that I have all the shell plates I would need already.
As usual any help is greatly apreciated.
Scratch

[This message has been edited by Scratch (edited January 22, 2000).]
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Old January 23, 2000, 02:12 PM   #2
WESHOOT2
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If you want to make large quanities of quality ammo fast, then buy the Dillon.

Hornady gear is great, but cannot match the production rate of the Dillon (or its powder-check station).

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Old January 23, 2000, 02:49 PM   #3
Trooper
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I own a 650, so here goes.

"I want to know what it is that makes you like the press." First it would have to be the way that it arrived. By that I mean, every part is packaged in its own box, clearly labeled as to what it is, and in that box are all the parts necessary to put it together, clearly labeled in their own bag. It is pure pleasure to not have to dump all the assorted screws, washers and nuts out of one bag and sort through them to try and match them up with a picture of what you are trying to assemble. I loved it. The quality is beyond belief. There is no scrmimping to save a buck in anything they sell. Not a flaw anywhere on anything. Absolutely perfect. The manual I got with my Lee was 4 pages of pictures and cursory instructions. This manual is 60 pages covering everything from unpacking, to troubleshooting, and it does it for both rifle and pistol. Very thorough. The video is over an hour long and covers the same things, but obviously you get to see what they are talking about as well. Worth the five bucks.

"How is the press without all the extras that
they have bolted to it in the catalogs?" Well, I bought the 650 strong mount, roller handle, bullet tray and a quick change assembly. After having a press bolted directly to the edge of the bench, I wouldn't trade anything for the strong mount. Frankly, I don't see why others haven't copied it. It raises your press several inches off the bench where you can see it. It also spreads the footprint of the press out and moves it back from the edge of the bench, giving it far greater strength and stability. I highly recommend it when you can afford it. If at all possible I'd buy it when I ordered the press. The roller handle makes things sooo smooth and eases the fatigue of cycling the press. It gives a great feel to the machine. The bullet tray bolts to the strong mount on the left side of the press and raises your bullets up where it is convenient to set the bullet in the case--economy of motion. It holds several hundred bullets and is nice to have. You can do without it until you can afford it. The quick change tool head assembly comes assembled with a powder measure, tool head and tool head stand. Put your dies in it, get them adjusted to where you want them, then it is no sweat to change calibers. Pull two pins, disconnect the fail safe rod's wingnut and slide the whole thing out. Place your other tool head in, replace the pins and tighten the fail safe rod wingnut. Simple and quick. If you are going to be changing calibers, I recommend it, otherwise you will be constantly changing powder measures between tool heads. Not a big deal, but the quick change makes it easy. As for the case feed, I didn't buy it right away. But it is next on the list.

"What side do you put the case in and what side does it eject from I'm a lefty." The case feed tube is mounted on the right rear of the press if you are facing the machine. It is held by a small, removable bracket that mounts to the case feed mount bar which is attached to the left rear of the machine. The bracket is removed when you get the case feed assembly. That holds the case feed tube in place. The case feed tube alone holds 22/.223 cases. Case feeding is positive and smooth. I have had no problems whatever with cases being inserted correctly or with any misfeeds. I can't wait to get the case feed assembly.

"What side does it eject from I'm a lefty." Cases are ejected automatically from the shell plate into a bin on the right rear of the machine, just behind the case feed tube. You don't have to do a thing except empty the bin. There is a heavy metal case ejector that fits over the top of the shell plate. As the loaded round reaches that point, the wire contacts the case ejecting it into the bin. It works great with no problems!

"I'm also wondering about the priming system on both of them. How do they work?" The priming system is the best I have ever seen. You never touch the primers. Primers are picked up by you in a transfer tube from the flip tray. The transfer tube is placed over the primer chute and they slide down the chute when you release them. The primer rod is placed into the primer tube which activates the primer warning system. This alerts you before you run out of primers. Neat system! Primers are held in the primer tube inside a heavy steel tube---couldn't be safer. There is a circular disk with holes milled into it the exact size of the primer, either small or large. As you cycle the machine, the disk rotates into position, a primer slides into the hole, and as the machine cycles, the disk rotates to place the primer under the empty case where it is seated. It is absolutely flawless! I have loaded several thousand rounds of pistol and rifle with never a cocked primer, misfeed, upside down primer, or no primer at all. It has been perfect out of the box. If there is no case present as the press is cycled, the primer continues around in the cycle and falls into a trough for you to retrieve later. To change primer sizes, simply looosen two bolts, remove the primer system and swap primer disks. Simple. This is not plastic junk either. It's all steel.

I can't say enough good about the 650. It gives you automatic indexing that is silky smooth, automatic priming that works perfectly, automatic case feed that is flawless and all in a top quality package. If you can't afford all the accessories, no problem. Get just the press. You can always add the accessories later, including the case feed assembly. You'll still have auto indexing, auto priming, and case ejection and the option to add the case feed later if you choose. Even if you don't, you still have a case feed tube that will hold quite a few cases. All you have to do is pull the handle with your right hand and set the bullet in the case with your left hand. Caliber conversions are quick and easy. I change from rifle to pistol in under ten minutes and I'm in no hurry. This press turns out quality ammo as fast as you can pull the handle. My first loading session I loaded 300 rounds of .223 in 30 minutes without even trying hard. My only regret is that I didn't buy this first, but then I wouldn't have known there was such crap out there if I had and wouldn't be able to appreciate what a fine machine this really is. I don't think you'll be disappointed. Hope this helps. If you have any more questions, just holler.
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Old January 23, 2000, 02:53 PM   #4
Trooper
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I also forgot to mention that Dillon includes the tools necessary to assemble the press and all its parts, except for some open end wrenches. If you buy the bench wrench, you won't even need those. I do recommend getting two of those. They are very useful in adjusting your dies.
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Old January 23, 2000, 05:00 PM   #5
walangkatapat
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DILLON!!!

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Old January 23, 2000, 05:01 PM   #6
Scratch
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TRooper,
Thank you very much for your post. It looked like it took a while and I do appreciate it. You answered several question that I had and pointed out a few I didn't have. From what you posted it sounded like the thing loads the case automatically without the the electric case feeder, Ijust have to keep the tube filled. Is this correct?
If so WOW!
You may have just sold me on the dillon. Now to convinse the wife.
BTW do you know anyone that whats to buy a used projector progressive press and shell plates? ;0)
Thanks again
Scratch (BOb)
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Old January 25, 2000, 09:58 AM   #7
karlfitt
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Scratch,
I also have a 650 and I agree with Trooper.

Also you are correct in assuming that all you have to do is keep the case feed tube full, although mine only holds 14 .223 cases and it seems that the only thing I do when I reload is refill this tube.

I used to have a Dillon 550 and agree with Troopers assesmen of the primer feed system. With the 550 I had cases with no primer or the primer would flip in the feed ram and I would have cases then with upside down primers.

Caliber changes are easy, I understand money being tight ( Isn't it for eveybody) but if you can get a toolhead and powder die for each of the calibers you will load. his is a feature I added later, after the initial purchase, but it makes caliber changes much faster when you don't have to set the powder measusre station each ime.

Karl
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Old January 26, 2000, 02:41 AM   #8
bk40
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You will never regret buying the Dillon!

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Old January 26, 2000, 09:46 AM   #9
Kenneth L. Walters
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Autoindexing sounds like a good idea BUT it is more trouble then it is worth. I'd STRONGLY recommend staying away from it!
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Old January 26, 2000, 11:49 PM   #10
Dan Z
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BUY DILLON,

I have the Hornady Lock-n-load. It is ok now that I have got it working. BUT, I have had to actually PAY for replacement parts that broke without my help. The priming system "only" messed up about 300-400 rounds. I finally figured out that chrome plated primers had less drag and their exlussive use generally solved the problem.

If you like paying for replacement parts and like spending hours fixing, fooling and tinkering with your press, get the Hornady. If you want to reload by Dillon.

I should have kept my mouth shut and given you a great deal on a Hornady so I could replace it with a Dillon. Unfortuantly for me I have to many calibre set ups for the press.

Dan
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Old January 27, 2000, 10:19 AM   #11
chall
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Scratch, Trooper has answered all your queeries dead on, I have owned & operated
Dillon Precision equip, for 19 years now,
have 3 original Dillon 1000 presses (no longer made-capable of producing 1000rds/hr
or greater, or you can go as slow as you like); 3 Dillion 550B presses, a Dillon 1050,
a Dillon 650. You cannot go wrong with them.
No warranty or customer service is better in
the industry. Technical help on the phone if
you like (they will walk you thru it!!)
And I am a lefty also!!

Chall
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Old January 27, 2000, 04:01 PM   #12
TheOtherMikey
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Buy a Dillon! There is no other press which even comes close to matching the Dillon's performance.

I have a 550B and I absolutely love it. A 650 gives you automatic movement of reloads to the next station. I have never heard anybody complain of a dillon press.

Buy it!! Enjoy it!! and come back in 6 months and tell everybody what you think.

Regards, and GO DILLON, Mikey.
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Old January 30, 2000, 09:22 PM   #13
Pierre
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Dillon!
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Old January 31, 2000, 05:57 PM   #14
Clint Tickler
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I've been watching this thread with great interest and now I've decided my Brand X Pro 1000 has frustrated me for the last time. The 650 is on it's way! Tell me though Trooper am I correct in my understanding that the 650 allows for a factory crimp die to be installed on the tool head thereby eliminating the need to do that seperately?
Thanks.
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Old January 31, 2000, 07:18 PM   #15
Scratch
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Clint, let me know what you think when it arrives.
Scratch
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Old January 31, 2000, 08:14 PM   #16
Banzai
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Ok, me too. I'm going to get the Dillon and save that 1000 for my beginning reloader brother of mine!

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Old January 31, 2000, 08:16 PM   #17
9x45
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Scratch, I have a Hornady Progressive Lock-N-Load. It is very stout, but the broached LNL bushings mean that only the longest of dies will work. The primer feeder is now where near the Dillion, although I think the micrometer rotary powder measure is more reliable and accurate. "For a Few Dollars More', I would go with the Dillion 650. Mike Dillion knows that the heart of any system is the primer feeder. That is where everything can go wrong...
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Old February 1, 2000, 10:35 PM   #18
Trooper
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Clint Tickler,
Yes, you are correct. The 650 tool head has five stations allowing for separate seating and crimping operations. I use Dillon's dies and have fallen in love with them. They do a great job. I have found that I don't have to use the Lee Factory Crimp die at all. I do check all my cases prior to loading in a case gage after trimming and have set my size die according to the case gage. Not one problem at all! You're gonna love your 650!

[This message has been edited by Trooper (edited February 01, 2000).]
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Old February 3, 2000, 09:08 AM   #19
WESHOOT2
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Best feature of the 650 is the optional POWDER CHECK. This device physically checks the powder quantity in EVERY case before you seat the bullet.

Remember, safety first!

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"All my ammo is factory ammo"

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Old February 4, 2000, 08:23 PM   #20
Nukem
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Go with the 650 if you can afford it. I've probably got $1K in this:
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Old February 4, 2000, 09:46 PM   #21
Clint Tickler
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Nice Pic. I can see how easy it is to put a thou into a 650. I ordered one earlier this week and then went back and ordered the case feeder, caliber change kits, etc. How big is the stong mount footprint? Can't wait to set it up.
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Old February 18, 2000, 12:58 AM   #22
Clint Tickler
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Ok, I've been spending a couple of hours a night setting up the new 650 with the dies and tool heads for the diferent calibers I load. I've loaded up about 300 rounds of 40 and 38's each and I gotta say I'm pretty pleased with this press. Yes, I've put some dough into it but when I look back at the frustration levals I reached with the Pro 1000 trying to keep primers and cases feeding reliably, well It's a world of diference. I loaded a lot of good rounds with the Pro 1000 in a couple of years and for the money served me pretty well. The Dillon is way ahead though in primer and case feeding. I've also noticed that O.A. stays more consistent then the 1000 I think because the tool head fits tighter. I'm using the same dies. Also with the 5th station I can set up the factory crimp die. Don't know anything about the Hornady but a freind of mine has the RCBS progressive and is real happy with it. No case feeding option though and no removable tool heads so each caliber change requires more set up but you can see where that may be more consistent. Lots of choices. I think I've made the right one for me now and maybe I can pass on the 1000 and get another reloader started. Good luck. Clint
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Old February 18, 2000, 11:14 PM   #23
WalterGAII
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AND, you can get Dillon equipment for 20% less than in the Dillon Cat. from Bull-X. You have to ask for Carter Jones. He'll have your new 650 and any accessories drop-shipped to you.
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