The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old May 2, 2006, 03:54 PM   #1
DeltaWhiskey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 13, 2005
Posts: 226
S&W extended firing pin

Does anyone here have any experience with the extended firing pin made by Cylinder & Slide for S&W revolvers? I have a 625 that was butchered by some table top gunsmith before i got it and i don't have reliable ignition except when I use Federal primers. I'm hoping that this device will clear this problem up but i don't want it if using it will leave me open to other potential snafus.

Thanks!
__________________
"I'm DeltaWhiskey on the other forums, too."
DeltaWhiskey is offline  
Old May 3, 2006, 07:20 AM   #2
Lazy D
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2004
Location: Indian Territory
Posts: 192
could be a few issues.

From your post I take it you're having light strikes. This is usually a result of someone filing down the strain screw, or just loosening it up to lighten the hammer weight. First make sure the strain screw is completely tight. If not that most likely is the problem. If it is tight, then I would first replace it, and fit a new one. A good test for hammer weight is to take an old aluminum shotgun cleaning rod. Best to find one just under the bore diameter. Cut a section 6-7" then weigh it on a powder scale. You need to work it down to 270 grains. (Insure your gun is empty) Cock the hammer and place the rod down the barrel. With the muzzle straight up, dry fire it. It should push the rod about 12" past the muzzle. If it doesn't you need more hammer weight.
I don't know the cost of the firing pin you are talking about, but I would imagine the cost of a strain screw is much cheaper.$3-$5. Having said all that, if the last fella had worked down the mainspring, the strain screw probably wont help, but it might.

Second possible is cylinder end shake. If the cylinder has much fore and aft play it may not be holding the rounds close enough to the back for the FP to strike the primer.

I would bet it is hammer weight.
Good luck
__________________
"Fast is Fine but accuracy is final.".....Wyatt Earp.
Lazy D is offline  
Old May 3, 2006, 09:51 AM   #3
JoeHatley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 1999
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,135
I've installed them in 5 of my 625's. They work great. Fiting is minor.

Good Luck...

Joe
__________________
Go NRA
JoeHatley is offline  
Old May 3, 2006, 06:56 PM   #4
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,084
Unless the other (non-Federal) primers seat deeper, an extended hammer nose won't do the job. The only thing the C&S hammer nose will do is reach out further, but if the mainspring is too light or the hammer too light, or headspace excessive, it won't help.

Usually "butchering" of an S&W revolver takes the form of "doing a trigger job", so Lazy D's advice is pretty good.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is online now  
Old May 4, 2006, 10:18 AM   #5
JoeHatley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 1999
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,135
Actually Jim, the longer pin does help. Primers are set off not only by the force of the pin strike, but also by the compression of the primer mix between the cup and anvil. Longer pin = more compression (even if hits are with the same force)

Joe
__________________
Go NRA
JoeHatley is offline  
Old May 4, 2006, 03:18 PM   #6
bdcc11
Member
 
Join Date: February 7, 2006
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 30
If the gun is for defense use, then make sure you have a strain screw that has not been altered and screw it in all the way. Don't use reduced power springs.

If it is for fun and competition with a lighter spring and strain screw then the extra length firing pin works great with federal primers. You shouldn't dry fire without snap caps with the extra length pin.

Minor fitting may be require on some guns.
bdcc11 is offline  
Old May 7, 2006, 09:49 PM   #7
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,084
Joe, I agree, but what I am saying is that if the firing pin momentum is inadequate in the first place (mainspring too weak or hammer too light), it doesn't matter how much firing pin protrusion there is. The firing pin could stick out 1/4 inch, but the primer won't fire, since the firing pin momentum will not be enough to fire it. In other words, greater firing pin protrusion (i.e., a longer firing pin) will solve some misfiring problems, but not all of them.

Until the gun is checked for the actual cause, replacing the firing pin could be a waste of time and money.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is online now  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06907 seconds with 7 queries