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Old December 14, 1999, 03:32 PM   #1
JKnight
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What is the best Reloading manual?
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Old December 14, 1999, 04:06 PM   #2
Big Bunny
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What exactly are you reloading for, I wonder?

Lyman does a good 1999 shotgun manual and an excellent separate rifle/pistol one, but Hornady and Sierra manuals are also good and have some excellent data and advice.

What the hell ...buy the lot, you won't regret it as fashions and calibres change, you will have a good reference work!

Some good bargains in superceeded powder and other components too come up from time to time.
IE YOU have the recipes...no-one else does. [I picked up a can of 7lb of Du Pont 700X like that, only AUD$20 and in perfect condition too!] (Great for 12ga traploads/light 12ga field and 38spl pistol!)

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Old December 14, 1999, 10:47 PM   #3
swifter...
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Strongly suggest you obtain several, you can't have too many.

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The Bill of Rights, and the Golden Rule are enough for civilized behavior. The rest is window dressing. Shoot carefully, swifter...

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Old December 15, 1999, 12:30 AM   #4
Robert the41MagFan
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You need at least three

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Old December 15, 1999, 09:18 AM   #5
Peter M. Eick
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I agree with Robert, you need at least 3. When ever I change a load, or when ever I set up a new caliber on the bench I always check things out. Here is my procedure when I change (lets just say it is due to a "learning" experience):

1)Weight the bullet in question (check it really is what the box is labeled)
2) Check my notes for the planned load and write up my load label
3) Check Seirra's manual and make sure my load label is in spec
4) Check Speer's manual and make sure I am in spec
5) Check Hornady's manual and make sure I am in spec
6) Check the specific powder company's manual and make sure I am in spec.
7) Finally make the first round, check for feeding and again check powder scale, COL and bullet weight.
8) Make the production run of rounds
9) Log the production run into my notes.
10) (fun part) shoot the load, note results

I know it sounds complex, but this system has kept me out of trouble for years, and it builds a lot of confidence in my production techniques.

Good luck.
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Old December 15, 1999, 09:22 AM   #6
Peter M. Eick
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By the way, as I reread my comments, I should note that unless I am shooting my 10mm, I tend to shoot pretty conservative loads. I do not like to exceed the minimum maximum load of any of the load manuals.

My 10mm on the other hand is pushed hard. I use pressure ring data to determine safe max loads in my pistol.
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Old December 15, 1999, 10:16 AM   #7
JoeHatley
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JKnight,

The "best" reloading manuals are the ones published by the manufactures of your components.

If you havn't determined which powder or bullets you will be using, then all the previous comments about having several are right on the money.

One other option, if you are going to be reloading for a caliber that is covered, is to buy a Loadmap from Midway.

Good Luck...

Joe


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Old December 15, 1999, 11:24 AM   #8
JKnight
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Thanks for all the great advice. I havent reloaded in years and I'm just getting setup again. I only had the lyman manual before and was wondering if there was a better one.
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Old December 15, 1999, 12:14 PM   #9
Mal H
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JKnight, here's more encouragement to get several manuals. I have 8 from various bullet and powder manufacturers and use them all on a regular basis. In addition, I also have a couple of the Midway load manuals and highly recommend them if you shoot one of the three included calibers. As Joe said, the Loadmaps are also very good. They are collections of pages from the various manuals for a specific caliber, but be aware that the data in them is sometimes out of date. IMO you already have one of the best. The Lyman manual is excellent, not only for the load information, but it also has very good sections on reloading techniques and ballistics. It's also has the most lead loads for most calibers.
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Old December 15, 1999, 04:12 PM   #10
Big Bunny
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Great posting Peter, I will follow this course in future as I have recent memories of "pulling" 60 sqib loads for a 303 Martini!A real chore.
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Old December 16, 1999, 05:12 PM   #11
Peter M. Eick
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Big Bunny,

You correctly guessed why I follow that procedure. I squibbed out many (I am to embarassed to say how many) 32 auto years back and had to pull the rest of the lot.

I used my prior (old) notes and did not cross check for with current load manuals. I knew it was a light charge, I just did not realize how light I was going. Fortunately it was lead bullets, so they were "lobbed" out at about 400 fps and I had to hand cycle the gun each time.

It was kind of interesting because you could see the bullet fly in flight but it was a waste of time. In retrospect it taught me a good lesson (safely).

Ever since then I multiply cross reference my manuals, always triple check everything and NEVER go above lowest max charge listed in any of the manuals, or below the lowest min charge also listed.

Have fun.

pete
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