The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 27, 1999, 03:00 PM   #1
EQUALIZER
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 1999
Posts: 657
I've read that Glocks have occasionally blown up (ka-boom) because lead reloads were used. Lead in barrel built up and the shooter shot jacketed ammo before cleaning the barrel. The plumbing backed up and the bang was on the wrong end. I am thinking of getting a glock, but only if I can safely shoot reloads out of wheel weights for practice.

Q: Does anyone know if it is safe to use wheel weights as long as I'm careful to clean the barrel after my practice sessions? Or should I just stick with another company that doesn't use polygonal barrels?

------------------
"But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip; and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." -Jesus Christ (Luke 22:36, see John 3:15-18)
EQUALIZER is offline  
Old September 28, 1999, 10:59 AM   #2
EQUALIZER
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 1999
Posts: 657
For anyone interested,

I just found the answer to my question at a Para-Ordnance/1911 message board. I was surprised at how many ways that the Glocks can KaBoom. For anyone who wants to know:

1) The way I described above. Barrels getting leaded up so much that the diameter is reduced by a caliber. I wish I knew how many shots before this becomes a hazard.

2) After market recoil system. "The one thing you should never do to a Glock is mess with the recoild system. If they do not go fully into battery they can still give a firm, but not full strike to the primer." CARN

3) Double charges of reloads. Usually 40 S&W, but the model 21 .45 was also reported as well as a 9mm 19 by another source. The unsupported barrel adds to the possibility of hand injury with a back fire.

4) As w/ double charges, an inadequate crimp seems to be a reloading problem. During the cycle while the new round is striped off of the mag and as it enters the chamber, it hits twice and glances before it is fully chambered. If the crimp is not firm enough, the bullet can be shoved back into the brass, compressing the powder and increasing the pressures significantly. This is more of a reloading problem than a Glock design problem , IMHO.

My personal conclusion is that numbers two and three and four can probably be avoided. Double charges can cause the same problem in most other firearms, although I believe this to be a bigger potential hazard from those with unsupported barrels. Number 2 bothers me that the gun can still fire if not all of the way into battery. I've never heard of this being a problem with any other handguns with factory firing pins. Has anyone else? This doesn't sound like a problem w/glocks IF the factory recoil spring is used.

Althesame, the leading part is what bothers me. If I use soft roundnose in a Glock, just how many rounds in a session should be shot before safety from leaded bore obstruction becomes an issue? They seem like the ultimate in simplicity and the design of Glocks is amazing. I'm going to have to think about this one.

------------------
"But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip; and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." -Jesus Christ (Luke 22:36, see John 3:15-18)
EQUALIZER is offline  
Old September 28, 1999, 01:24 PM   #3
Bill Hebert
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 15, 1999
Posts: 180
I've not really run the numbers, but i suspect the cost of jacketed bullets is worth not having the lead cleaning problem. Sunday we shot 38spl. semi wads in a S&W and the lead splatter on the cylinder and crain was a pain to clean. If i ever shoot the millions of lead semi wads I have, I'm seriously considering only jacketed...
Bill Hebert is offline  
Old September 28, 1999, 06:33 PM   #4
Walt Welch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 3, 1998
Location: Alamo, CA
Posts: 424
This subject has been discussed at great length in a number of places. The consensus seems to be:

Even factory loads can cause a kBOOM, especially in pistols with bbls. that only partially support the case head in .40 S&W.

If you want to shoot lead bullets, the only safe way is to get an after market bbl, which fully supports the case head, and has conventional (not polygonal) rifling.

Hope this helps, Walt
Walt Welch is offline  
Old September 29, 1999, 02:07 PM   #5
EQUALIZER
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 1999
Posts: 657
Dr. Welch,

If you are half the physician as you are an all around knife and gun expert, I wish you were my family physician.

I've come to the same conclusion as you concerning the use of reloads, lead, and Glocks. In addition to the above observation that I posted, I think we ran across some of the same information. That 40S&W round seems to get worked pretty hard in an unsupported barrel. In addition to the barrel problem, in Glocks, that plastic frame doesn't offer much resistance in the way of redirecting a back fire. In a steel or aluminum frame back fire, the magazine is often blown out of the mag well. In one glock I saw a picture of, that major tendon/nerve/laceration damage that we talked about in the blade forum must have kept at least one hand surgeon off of the golf course for an afternoon.

What the glocks give in the way of lightweight carry, they give up in the way of safety in regards to the present subject. I guess every firearm, knife, or any other tool has its specialized nitch, strengths, and drawbacks.

Bill,

You make a good point. When buying jacketed or plated bullets, I've seen them on sale in quantity around $0.05 ea. It seems to be worth the nickle out the barrel to save the extra clean up. The two things I like about casting is that it seems a little more rewarding to me to use reloads made from scratch, when I have the time. I guess its kind of like women getting fresh vegetables from the garden and using them in their recipies rather than using a kit. Sometimes the processed stuff tastes the same or maybe better, but its more rewarding to start from scratch. Just a personal thing for me.

Its also nice to have the ability to always have the components of ammo available, just in case. They'll probably go for the propellant and primers first, but when they limit or stop our supply of components by legislation, or executive power, its nice to have that option to cast. But I agree with your point all the same. ;g

------------------
"But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip; and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." -Jesus Christ (Luke 22:36, see John 3:15-18)
EQUALIZER is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06306 seconds with 7 queries