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Old September 8, 1999, 05:18 AM   #1
Walker
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I recently tried loading cast lead bullets for the first time. I have not been impressed with my results so far. Maybe some of you can help me out. How much lube should a cast bullet have on it? The ones I bought have a thin film of lube on them above and below the lube groove, as well as in the groove. The problem is that every time I seat a bullet, a ring of lube is pushed to the front of the case mouth. If I don't wipe the lube off of every round as I assemble it, the lube builds up in the chamber so that after about 20 rounds, the gun won't even chamber a round anymore. This isn't normal is it? What is your experience with cast bullets?
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Old September 8, 1999, 02:05 PM   #2
Quantrill
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No, it is not normal to have that much excess lube on the bullets. The NRA's Col. Harrison did an extensive study on cast bullets and lubricants a few years back and most of his conclusions are still valid. Concerning lubricant, the bottom line is that the less you use, the more accurate the load. The problem is that the less you use the more likely you are to lead the barrel. As you already buy the lubricated bullets, there is not much you can do about the amount of it on the bullet except to wipe it off before seating or after. Possibly you could bell the case mouth a bit more prior to seating thereby trapping more lube inside the case. Usually lubing and sizing are done in one operation and any excess lube is cleaned off the bullet as it is sized. Good luck! Quantrill
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Old September 8, 1999, 05:52 PM   #3
Big Bunny
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May I suggest you look at moving to a more modern lube or perhaps even a teflon-coated lead projectile ?
Your current brand sounds as if it is from the 1800s!

------------------
***Big Bunny***
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Old September 8, 1999, 06:50 PM   #4
Paul B.
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Quantrill. I think, if memory serves, that Col Harrisons comments were directed to the NRA's 50-50 Alox-beeswax lube. The new hard lubes found on most commecial cast bullets don't seem to give that problem, at least not for me. I don't use commercial bullets. I cast and lube my own, and I will not use the NRA formula at all anymore. it smells bad. It runs and gets hard to work with during our southern Arizona summers. it is smoky as hell, and makes your firearm all smoked up. The only good thing I have found with it, is it does promote good accuracy with some rifle loads.
My suggestion to the fellow with the excessive lube problem. Wipe your ammo down and get rid of the excess. I do.
Paul B.
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Old September 11, 1999, 06:10 AM   #5
Quantrill
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After rereading Col. Harrison's article on lubricants, I find that he was referring generically to lubricants in general [at that time] in saying that more lube was detrimental to target accuracy. The same also applied to the newly [then] developed NRA formula lube. It could be that the new hard lubes do not have that problem. Many locally produced cast bullets for sale are still lubed with older style or even homemade lubes and this could apply to them. Without knowing who made the bullets [or lube], I couldn't say if that was the case in this instance. Anyway, it would be a good idea to reexamine the source of supply and possibly change to a source that was hard lubed or at least had less lube on the bullets. Quantrill
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Old September 11, 1999, 04:52 PM   #6
Paul B.
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Quantrill. All of the commercial cast bullets in my neck of the woods have the hard lube.
I hated that black gunk Lyman used to sell as bullet lube. I worked for a while for a commerial bullet caster, and used literally tons of that stuff. I don't much care for the NRA formula lube, although it works quite well. It's messy, it stinks, and on a hot summer day in my shed( My wife calls it my playpen) the lube will ooze out onto the floor. I hate that stuff. When using it on .38 Wadcutter bullets, I only lube the bottom groove. Same with 185 and 200 gr. in .45 ACP. Any more lube and accuracy goes down the tube.
I have gotten good results with Lymans "Orange Magic" but you do need a heater for your luber-sizer tool. I haven't tried "Orange" on the target loads yet. Want to use up all the Alox up first. It'll be a while as I got a good deal on it a few years ago. It'll probably be in the next 5 years before I use it all up. Got to cast the bullets first.
Looked through Col. Harrison's articles real quick like. Did not find where he said that on all lubes. Will let it stand for now until I have time to re-research it further. Still think I'm right on that issue though. Let's put that on hold for now.
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Old September 11, 1999, 05:40 PM   #7
Quantrill
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I believe that Col. Harrison referred to the odor of the NRA formula as "pungent" and I will certainly agree to that. Residing in NJ, I really don't have the problem of melting lube but I can relate to the buying it in quantity and using it for the next few years. Maybe that is why I'm not up to date on the latest "hard" lubes. The NRA lube does just about eliminate leading in both handgun and rifle loads for me. The Col. specifically mentions exactly what you refer to on .38 wadcutter bullets as to the best accuracy with lube in only one [bottom] groove and excess lube all over the muzzle with all three grooves filled. I compromised and lube in two groove although it will take longer that way to use up my supply. I remember well that black goo that Lyman sold years ago and if I never see or smell that again it will be too soon. To conclude, I think the bottom line to Walker's problem is to wipe off the excess lube on those bullets he has [either before or after seating] and either buy bullets with the "hard" lube or with less of the older lube. A pleasure conversing with a fellow caster Paul B. Quantrill
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