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Old July 19, 2015, 03:08 AM   #1
SeniorXJ
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Eye Sight Issues

I'm having a hard time focusing on both sights & target. I know ur supposed to shoot with both eyes open, but with as hard as I try, my focus will be on only the front sight/sights or the target which leads to the obvious.

Yes I've tried glasses, but they either make my sights more visible & less blurry or the target so I'm back to square one. Fyi, I'm type 2 diabetic & have no eye care insurance.

Any suggestions will help so I thank u in return!
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Old July 19, 2015, 03:39 AM   #2
Bake
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There is advice is primarily for rifles, but will also be valid for handguns.

Of the three separate elements of the site picture, the human eye will only focus on one of the elements at a time. With conventional iron sites, you must focus on the front site. The rear site will be fuzzy with an equal amount of light on each side of the front site. The target, bull's-eye will look like a fuzz ball. This problem is common to all ages, but as one grows older, it takes longer for the eyes to focus. You might try a 6 o'clock hold.

A receiver peep sight will improve your site picture, because it only involves two elements. Just focus on the front site. A double peep site (front and rear) will also be improved the site picture. With a double peep sight you focus on the target. This will be the only time you ever focus on the target when shooting.

A rule of thumb, you may want to try wearing last years reading glasses. Just take a ruler/yardstick with you to the local drugstore and check out the $10 to $15 reading glasses. All you want is the front sight to be in focus.
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Last edited by Bake; July 19, 2015 at 03:51 AM.
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Old July 19, 2015, 05:47 AM   #3
stagpanther
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Quote:
I'm having a hard time focusing on both sights & target. I know ur supposed to shoot with both eyes open, but with as hard as I try, my focus will be on only the front sight/sights or the target which leads to the obvious.

Yes I've tried glasses, but they either make my sights more visible & less blurry or the target so I'm back to square one. Fyi, I'm type 2 diabetic & have no eye care insurance.

Any suggestions will help so I thank u in return!
I'm in the same boat and have made several posts elsewhere on this subject. My experience so far is that it is really impossible to find glasses that will sharpen both intermediate and long distance at the same time without moving your head or eyes--though 1 person suggested--and I might try it--simply having just one side of the glasses intermediate and the other side long--makes sense and may be worth a try. Another solution that has worked for me is to mount a 2x scope and use glasses with intermediate focus--the glasses enable me to clearly see the sight picture which is the reticle and target in sharp focus. I've more or less given up on fixed irons that are close together on short slide semi-auto pistols.
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Old July 19, 2015, 07:08 AM   #4
garryc
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Same issue here, same cause, that and age. While I can't see to line that top edged up for fine target shooting I find the Straight 8 sight best. Three dot sights are just a white blur, there is simply too much going on. The only way that works for me is if that front is red with the rear two white.

Try a Heinie straight 8 sight.
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Old July 19, 2015, 07:45 AM   #5
kraigwy
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Quote:
I'm having a hard time focusing on both sights & target
No kidding. Your eyes (anyone's eyes) cant focus on two things at once.

You have three things you "could" focus on. Target, front sight, and rear sight. You have to pick one.

Pick the front sight. The target and rear sight should be fuzzy. Front sight should be clear and sharp.

Just line up the front sight in the fuzy rear sight, put the clear front sight on the fuzzy dot (target) and let her rip.

A trick it to pretend the front sight is on a bar that is hooked to the trigger. As you pull the trigger you slide the front sight to the rear.

If you concentrate on this, it will look like you are actually sliding the front sight to the rear.

Now we all know the front sight cant slide back, but you get an optical illusion that it is.

What happens is you are concentrating on the front sight, making it look clear and sharp, looking bigger and closer.

The more you concentrate on the front sight the tighter your groups will be.

Also the exercise above has you concentrating on a smooth pull of the trigger trying to get the sight to move to the rear. You end up with the correct sight picture an a smooth trigger pull.

-----------------------------------

Our sight goes south as we age, at 68 I'm right there with you.

I buy drug store reading glasses. I take a measurement from my eye to the front sight (rifle or pistol) and go to the drug store and buy a pair of reading glasses that allow me to see at that distance.

I can see a long ways but I cant see up close. In rifle shooting I use a score book or data book. I also play with the knobs on the rear sight to make corrections for wind or what ever.

My drug store glasses wont allow me to see the front sight and read the marks on my sights or write in my data book.

NO problem. I buy two sets of reading glasses. One to focus on the front sight, one to allow me to read, see the sights, or what ever. I get two of the same type glasses. I pop the left lens (Im right eye dominant) out and replace it with the left lens from the reading glasses.

Now I can use my right eye to concentrate on the front sight, and the left eye to see the marks on my rear sight or make notes in the data book.

Cpt. Edward Lewis states in his book "Military and Sporting Rifle Shooting" that there is no handicap that cant be overcome if one has a good coach.

In my nearly 40 years of coaching and marksmanship instruction I've found that to be true.

As I mentioned several times in the past, Gary Anderson said there are no hopeless shooters. I will add to that "there are problem coaches". We need to learn to adjust for a shooters perceived disabilities.
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Old July 19, 2015, 08:49 AM   #6
g.willikers
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I also use the two lens approach.
Left lens for long distance and right at about reading distance.
Fortunately, I can still see the front and rear sights on a pistol decent enough through the right lens.
Then with both eyes open, the sights and target are in focus.
The brain somehow accommodates.
Or take the easy way and use a dot scope.
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Old July 19, 2015, 09:57 AM   #7
Ike666
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I don't want to hijack this thread but how does it differ with a rifle scope. I tend to focus on the reticle rather than the target (I don't hunt) from the bench.
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Old July 19, 2015, 10:08 AM   #8
g.willikers
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If the target is clear enough to identify and and to know where to aim, most times that's plenty good enough.
Lots of folks use reading glasses to see the sights even better and let the target go as fuzzy as it wants.
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Old July 19, 2015, 10:57 AM   #9
Frank Ettin
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The human eye is physically incapable of focusing on two thing at different distances at the same time. Focus on the front sight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ike666
...how does it differ with a rifle scope. I tend to focus on the reticle...
That's what we were taught to do at Gunsite.
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Old July 19, 2015, 12:40 PM   #10
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Btw, I'm shooting a Ruger SR9 with Truglo TFX sights.
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Old July 19, 2015, 12:44 PM   #11
Frank Ettin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorXJ
Btw, I'm shooting a Ruger SR9 with Truglo TFX sights.
It doesn't matter. It's the same regardless of the type of iron sights.
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Old July 19, 2015, 02:06 PM   #12
1stmar
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I've posted and struggled w this myself. Also type 2 diabetes. In the end I use glasses that allow me to clearly see the front sight. The target, though supposed to be blurry, should be visible enough to pick the same aiming point. I usually settle in and then lift my glasses or tilt my head enough to see over my glasses to be sure I'm the front sight is centered. The shift back to the front sight till I break the trigger. It's frustrating but I've had good results. I'm looking for targets that are hi viz that may help. I do this for iron sights and rifle, pistol out to 50yds I can safely make out the target sufficiently.
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Old July 19, 2015, 02:21 PM   #13
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I think you're best off training with a gun, consistent w/ how you would have to use it - hunting, self defense, competitive event, etc.

That definitely has implications about what corrective lenses you should be wearing at the range.

I always wear distance glasses, and when I'm using iron sights at the range, I concentrate on the front sight, which is always somewhat blurry. I make my front sights fluorescent orange which helps the situation.
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Old July 19, 2015, 09:09 PM   #14
SeniorXJ
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A lot of great advice here & I can't thank you all enough for the support! It is a huge releaf to know that this is a common problem & that there are multiple solutions for different people as we are all different. Basically i have to chase my weak spot down & keep trying different solutions till I find it & fix it.

I've sent over 900 rounds down range indoors. I'm looking into outdoor ranges now as my overall goal is to shoot with accuracy indoors, then move it into sport outdoors. Basically I just wanna have fun & exercise my 2nd amendment,lol!

Thank You All Again!
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Old July 19, 2015, 09:29 PM   #15
Dufus
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I find that it is more important for me to focus on the sights. Therefore, I shoot with my reading glasses and even though the target is fuzzy, I can still hit where I am aiming. It took some adjusting and experimenting, but it all comes around with practice.
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Old July 19, 2015, 10:16 PM   #16
Jim243
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Quote:
I'm having a hard time focusing on both sights & target.
They have this new fangle invention called a rifle or pistol scope. It could solve your problem.

Jim
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Old July 28, 2015, 02:42 PM   #17
FlippinHippie
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Having recently having to switch to bifocals, I have the same problem. My solution was to bone up on my point shooting skills.

I pick out a tree with torso dimensions and blaze away at ten feet never looking at my sights. With a Glock 19 with 15 rounds, I always land every single round in the "engine room".

At 20 feet, I average 10-12 hits.

Funny thing happens at 30 feet. I start looking around for rocks to throw.
But keeping in mind that most all gunfights occur at less than ten feet, I'm not real worried.
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