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Old March 31, 2006, 12:23 PM   #1
Bigoledude
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Join Date: January 1, 2006
Location: Chalmette, Louisiana.
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Lost another one!!

My oldest son pulled out my Remington pump 30-06 last night. He asked me if I would trade him that old-but-perfect "760" for his Browning A-Bolt 7mm Mag.

I'm sure that sounds like a good deal to most of you but, I just really like that ole pump-gun. I'm gonna trade him because I know he will use it a grillion times more than I ever will.

Here's the question. I had a really good recoil pad on the 30-06 and will put one on the Browning also. My hunting loads (165 grain Sierra boattail hollow points) ran about 2450fps.

I don't need the ballistic performance that max loads of 7mm Mag produce. I've heard that by cutting way back on powder can cause pressure problems similar to using too much powder. Is this correct? Could somebody give this oledude a recipe for really tame, but accurate 7mm Mag loads?

How can too little powder cause pressure problems?
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Old March 31, 2006, 12:56 PM   #2
sundog
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I've found that the 7 mag is much more comfortable to shoot with 170ish grain bullets and really slow powder, much more so than the liver quivver little bullets going speed of light. Just my observation. sundog
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Old March 31, 2006, 01:33 PM   #3
DAVID NANCARROW
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Sometimes, an undercharged case can cause detonation, which is why magnum cases carry the warning not to go under the starting charge.
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Old March 31, 2006, 01:55 PM   #4
SDLAW
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An under charged case may not expand to seal in the chamber. This allows gasses to escape backwards and can lead to all kinds of nasty problems.
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Old April 1, 2006, 11:00 AM   #5
ClarkEMyers
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Distinguish between cutting back on slow powder and light loads of fast powders.

It is certainly true that taking a maximum load of say IMR 7828 and a 160 grain bullet and cutting back on the IMR 7828 to a small fraction of the original load is a bad idea.

On the other hand there a many tested and proven loads to approximate say 7X57 or 7mm'08 loads in the larger case all the way down to the loads in Cast Bullet handbooks that use relatively small loads of pistol powders to achieve pistol ballistics with cast bullets in the 7mm Rem Mag case.

Although it is a bad idea to just reduce the amount of powder below proper starting loads there is no problem (save maybe the possibility of double or even triple loads if not careful) using small amounts of the proper powder.
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Old April 1, 2006, 01:44 PM   #6
hoghunting
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Big,
During my reloading, I found that most reduced loads are not nearly as accurate as loads that are closer to max charges. They will shoot ok, but I've gone from near max loads at 1" or less @ 100 yds to reduced loads shooting anywhere from 5" and larger @ 100 yds.
I have tried different powders and primers but they still shoot best as hotter loads. Other peoples' guns might be different, but that's how mine are.
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