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Old February 7, 2006, 01:03 AM   #1
dallasconundrum
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.357 Magnum Cartridges For Boar Question

Alright, this isn't the normal question of whether or not the .357 is adequate for feral hogs. I know that the popular consensus is that it is marginal. And normally, I carry a .44 for backup. However, it does get kinda uncomfortable on the hip after walking all day, and my friend that goes with me ONLY has a .357 for backup. So, I was looking at some cartridges for both of us to use (if I do decide to take one of my .357s out).

Right now, his .357 is loaded with Remington 125 grain hollow points....which is feel is not the best thing he could be using in the gun. I am looking for something more along the lines of these three cartridges:

Winchester 180 Grain Partition Gold
Grizzly 180 Grain Cast Performance Lead Wide Flat Nose Gas Checked (never heard of this brand but they have them on www.midwayusa.com)
Buffalo Bore 180 Grain Lead Flat Nose Gas Checked

Which of these (or any others) would you guys recommend?
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Old February 7, 2006, 02:21 AM   #2
Garand Guy
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Quote:
Buffalo Bore 180 Grain Lead Flat Nose Gas Checked
Never shot one, but I've heard they pack a heck of a wollop. Some say that Double Tap is also a pretty healthy round. Either one should get the job done.
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Old February 7, 2006, 08:00 AM   #3
RsqVet
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Any of the 180 gr hard cast should be the best you will get from 357 unless you hand load and push it a little bit, I personally would not feel undergunned for a hog with these. They do kick but not horriffic --- I fired a few through a SP101 cause I was thinking of using it as a hiking gun but that made me decided to carry my 3 inch GP100 but I lived.
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Old February 7, 2006, 08:25 AM   #4
9mm1033
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When this topic comes up, I remember the Winchester 180 Grain Partition Gold has always been mentioned.
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Old February 7, 2006, 09:37 AM   #5
superpelly
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Federal 180gr castcore. They say it can stop a black bear (probably a very small, black bear)?
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Old February 7, 2006, 09:47 AM   #6
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I would go with Buffalo Bore or Grizzly.
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Old February 7, 2006, 10:17 AM   #7
fisherman66
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I went with the Winchester Supreme Partion Gold 180 for that same task (I was looking for Bufallo Bore, but they didn't have it at the gun shop.) The .357 was backup to a rifle, and never needed it. I lit off all but 6 at the range. They were very controlable but it was definately near the top of .357 mag ammo. They will expand as they have a sjhp. I put a self imposed limit of about 200lbs on me because of the expansion. Next trip I will have a cast load, and probably use the .357 for the main gun with a rifle in a buddies hands for backup. The Win load strikes me as more of a thin skinned load. I recommend the cast lead for large hogs. Maybe I should get some gelatin and do a test with Win, BB, DT, and Fed. That should yield some interesting results. I'll tell you the cast load "should" have much greater penetration (I'd guess it would win by a wide margin in penetration.

Edit: I went back and looked...they are full jacket hollow point (the jacket extends all the way to the hollow point. The hollow point is very deep.
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Old February 7, 2006, 12:08 PM   #8
Majic
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Any of the 180 grain hard cast loads. Sometimes you need all you can get to punch thru a big hog.
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Old February 7, 2006, 08:29 PM   #9
cje1980
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I think you mean 357Magnum "loads" for boar as the "cartridge" is actually the 357Magnum itself. Anyway, I would go with no less than a 158gr. JSP. Preferrably a fairly hot 180gr. HC load. Federal's 180gr. CastCore should work well. It does over 1200fps from a 4" barrel and will definitely ruin a boar's day.
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Old February 8, 2006, 05:05 AM   #10
dallasconundrum
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Thanks everyone for the responses. I am pretty sure that I am going to go with the Buffalo Bores. I am also going to try to talk my friend into them, or since ordering off the internet is not an option for him, at least maybe I can talk him into some 158 grainers of some kind.

cje1980 - I did not realize we were being the rigidly formal. Heck, around where I live most people lump them all together and call them "bullets" or "shells" or even "hulls".
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Old February 8, 2006, 10:44 PM   #11
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Didn't mean to offend you dallas. It just sounded kind of odd thats all. I don't think the BB loads are really necessary. Just use the Federal 180gr. Cast-core, or maybe Corbon's 180-200gr. loads. Either of these will offer pretty good penetration. It is going to be hard to practice extensively with bullets that cost $1 per bullet. Those BB loads are mighty expensive.
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Old February 8, 2006, 11:42 PM   #12
dallasconundrum
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Oh, no no. None taken at all. You caught me in a slip-up. I didn't mean for my response to sound snappy just funnin'.

You have brought up another valid point though. Those BBs are a little harder on the wallet than most others. But, I have found an online store that stocks the BBs and for the 180 grainers their price is $17.99 per 20. Which is cheaper than the online store price for the Corbons. So, I am thinking I might pick up two boxes of them. Then I can shoot the first box up, get my gun sighted in to them, and get a feel for them.

Anyway though, all of this might end up being pretty academic anyway as I'll likely keep carrying the .44 for the time being. Like I say though, I do feel I really need to at least get my friend to the gun store so he can get SOMETHING besides those 125 grain hollowpoints.
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Old February 9, 2006, 12:38 AM   #13
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My understanding of Boars is that the real issue is the "BoarShield" - a very tough, cartiledge like layer that surounds a boar body and vitals. My understanding of this shield is that it was nature's evolution that allows boars to live after being gored by their own kind in fighting. I've read that the Boarshield is tough enough to stop 00 buckshot from ever reaching the vitals of the pig.

Now, I will be the first to say the following: I've never taken a boar. Only read about it. It's on my "todo" list for 2006. For that matter my .350RM 673 Remington will be my initial weapon of choice.

Back to the question at hand: .357's and the Boarshield. Forget hollowpoints. Forget the jacketed softpoints. Expansion going through the shield is going to cause far too much energy loss to allow a slow moving .357 round to do the job. (please note: slow moving = 1500fps on a 158gr JSP vs. 2700fps on a 200gr CoreLokt .350RM).

180 grain hardcast lead loaded to 1200+ fps or so sounds to be the absolute minimum load to get the job done on a boar. My current .357 hunting load is a 180 Hornady XTP chrono'ed to over 1300fps. This works well for thinskinned game but for hog?

Gimme a Penn 180 gr. Hardcast TCFP loaded to 1300 +. Maximum penetration to reach the vitals.

PS: Hmmm, handloaded hot load .357 on a Penn Hardcast...let's see. $0.05 per bullet...$0.03 per primer...$0.07 for powder (being generous here)...$0.15 per loaded cartridge...$7.50 per box of 50 (or $3.00 per box of 20). Hmmmm...cost savings of $0.85 per round...a full loading set would pay for itself in around 400 rounds...

Bah, thread hijack. We now return you to your regularly schedule Hog Debate that has nothing to do with 1800cc blown S&S motors...
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Old February 9, 2006, 01:34 AM   #14
dallasconundrum
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Yes the "shield" is the big worry point. That's why, if possible, I'm going for a head shot. It's also the reason I've been lugging that big honkin .44 around like I have. I also agree that, reloading would be very beneficial to me right now. I only wish that I could. Someday I'm going to get into it, but right now is just not the time for me. Trying to transition between undergraduate school and medical school (hopefully). So, not a lot of time and dinero at the present for extra stuff. Not to mention the fact that I don't even know where I'll end up this fall. Soon though, hopefully soon.

Between my friend and myself, we always have at least one rifle with us as the primary gun. Last few times he has taken his 7mm Mag out with his 686 as backup. And I've backed him up further still with the .44. However, if one gets close enough I'm gonna take it with the .44.

P.S. I have finally thought of a way to tactfully tell him that I think he needs a different load. He is pretty new to handguns, and doesn't want to mess with his adjustable sights. However, I have been noticing when he shoots that he hits a little low. I'm gonna tell him that if he moves up to a heavier weight load then this will likely solve that problem for him. Pretty slick huh?
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Old February 11, 2006, 10:10 AM   #15
rnovi
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Not a bad Idea at all about how to tell him! Heh, a 180 grainer might print just a bit too high though! Good idea though.

And trust me, having gone through two undergraduate degrees and to have earned an MBA, I do indeed know what you mean when you say "not a lot of money". Keep on it - your education is priceless and is/will be the best investment you ever make.
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