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Old January 12, 2006, 02:01 PM   #1
Philthy
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Looking for THE most comprehensive reloading data

For the past few months, I've been using the 'recipe' my club has been providing to me for reloading .357 magnum and .45 ACP. I want to start experimenting. More specifically, reduce a recurring problem of excessive pressure I'm observing in my primers.

Nevertheless, It's time to invest in a reliable and comprehensive reloading manaul.....something I should have done when I bought my Dillon XL650. I'll be confining my loads to handgun only.

Can you folks help recommend one for me, please & thanks.
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Old January 12, 2006, 02:54 PM   #2
Thirties
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Two books for you . . .

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=442318

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=424613

.
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Old January 12, 2006, 05:56 PM   #3
tjhands
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Exactly the books I was going to suggest. They're basically all I ever use. It's so easy to cross-referrence loads between the different bullet/powder makers. And....they're CHEAP!
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Old January 12, 2006, 09:51 PM   #4
Leftoverdj
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Nothing wrong with the two books mentioned if you are going to stick with those two cartridges. Lee #2 is a more comprehensive collection of powder makers's data.

Ken Waters's "Pet Loads" is the best manual going. It gives fewer loads, but much more information on what to do, why, and how.
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Old January 12, 2006, 11:37 PM   #5
azredhawk44
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Hodgdon puts out a "magazine-like" format where they reprint every year. It cost me $8 at the Dillon store (I live in Scottsdale).

Lyman puts out a large-scale paperback-like book that is inexpensive but provides a wealth of different loadings.

The Lee #2 is good in some respects, but some of the data differs with what other makers suggest. I have found several discrepancies in it and I trust any of my other reloading manuals to be more accurate than it.

The cartridge-specific loading manuals (I have one for .44magnum) are really just photocopied compilations of different powder maker's data and different bullet maker's data. No independent research. Very good data, but freely available off the internet if you have a printer and a half and hour. If you put in an order with Dillon for anything and ask for the Alliant, Accurate or anybody else's free reloading manuals you will get them shipped with your order. Winchester, Hornady, Accurate, Alliant and others all post reload data on their manufacturers' websites. So do Berry's Bullets and Rainier Bullets (two common inexpensive "plated" bullet manufacturers).

Good cartridges to choose, btw. Very versatile, especially when you get into handloading. Good luck!
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Old January 13, 2006, 12:10 AM   #6
lizziedog1
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Cartridges of the World, by Frank Barnes, has reloading data for more different rounds then any other source I know of. The data for any particular cartridge is limited in this book, but you can get enough information to reload just about any centerfire round ever created. The nonloading information in the book also makes for interesting reading.
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Old January 13, 2006, 12:42 AM   #7
T. O'Heir
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Get a Lyman manual and work up a load the same way you would for a rifle.
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Old January 13, 2006, 08:11 AM   #8
HSMITH
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If you are seeing pressure signs in 45 primers you are over rated pressures by a TON, and WAY outside of any published data. Unlikely.

On the 357, you can get false indications of pressure from very simple things like an enlarged firing pin hole.

Guns used, problems observed and load data would help to find the problem if you care to share that information.

There is not one complete source of data, you really need two quality manuals and three of them is even better.
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Old January 13, 2006, 09:25 AM   #9
Leftoverdj
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Quote:
The Lee #2 is good in some respects, but some of the data differs with what other makers suggest. I have found several discrepancies in it and I trust any of my other reloading manuals to be more accurate than it.
Lee #2 data is just a reprint of data supplied by the powder makers with a few clearly marked instances in which they calculated data for obscure cartridges from very similar, but more cartridges. With the exception of the cast bullet loads in Chapter 10, Lee did not shoot data.

I'd be real interested in just what those "discrepancies" were.
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Old January 13, 2006, 10:38 AM   #10
azredhawk44
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Quote:
Lee #2 data is just a reprint of data supplied by the powder makers with a few clearly marked instances in which they calculated data for obscure cartridges from very similar, but more cartridges. With the exception of the cast bullet loads in Chapter 10, Lee did not shoot data.

I'd be real interested in just what those "discrepancies" were.
One off the top of my head (I'm not at home right now) is the .45acp loading using 230gr jacketed and 6.0gr Unique.

The published range by Unique powders is different than the published range that Lee put in the book.

I suspect (but don't know) that this is because old man Lee puts data in there to accomodate his dipper system and ignores more accurate equipment such as a good powder measure.

I've seen a few others, too. I'll expound more, later on when the books are in front of me.
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Old January 13, 2006, 04:12 PM   #11
Leftoverdj
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Quote:
One off the top of my head (I'm not at home right now) is the .45acp loading using 230gr jacketed and 6.0gr Unique.

The published range by Unique powders is different than the published range that Lee put in the book.

http://recipes.alliantpowder.com/rg....escr=230%20FMC

Same top load Alliant recommends.
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Old January 13, 2006, 04:43 PM   #12
azredhawk44
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That's FMC, not FMJ.

Not sure what they mean my FMC, but they draw a distinction themselves since they use it differently than the FMJ loading.

Also, if you look at the 230gr JHP loading at Allliant's website, it goes up to 6.4gr unique.

Lee labels that load as 230gr FMJ. Unique labels it as 230gr FMC.

There's one discrepancy. I'll find more for you later on.
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Old January 13, 2006, 07:50 PM   #13
kingudaroad
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My starter books( bought last year )..
speer reloading manual
nosler reloading manual
hornady reloading manual(vol. 1 and 2)
lyman reloading manual
ABC's of reloading


I know I went a little overboard but these things are fun to read. It seems that each one offers different information than the others. A lot more than just recipes.
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Old January 13, 2006, 08:29 PM   #14
azredhawk44
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Lee discrepancies

Lee #2, pg 670

Unique under a 230gr Jacketed bullet (no info for JHP, BTW):

Quote:
Starting grains 6.0, never exceed 6.0, 16,000 PSI OAL 1.190
Lyman #48, pg 356

Unique under a 230gr TMJ
Quote:
Starting grains 5.9 @ 12,500 PSI, never exceed 6.6gr at 15,800 PSI OAL 1.275
As I already demonstrated, Alliant's own website shows a load of 6.4gr Unique for a JHP at 230gr.

Also, look at .357 data. Page 556 in Lee #2 shows minimum charge of 7.2gr (max 7.8gr) Unique under a 158gr Jacketed bullet. Lyman #48 page 337 shows minimum charge of 6.4gr (max 8.3gr) in a JHP. Bullet construction is slightly different, but weights are the same.

What gets me is that Lee is not as accurate as others regarding minimum or maximum charges. In the case of the .357, Lyman exceeds Alliant's recommended charge for a 158gr bullet, but report the pressure at 38,000 as opposed to Alliant's rating of 33,000. That then becomes your decision to breach that pressure plane. Are you shooting a 30 year old Uberti cowboy clone that has been beat to hell? Better stick around 6.4gr @ 19,000 pressure. Or are you shooting one of the rare and cherished Redhawk .357's out there? Push it to 40,000 pressure, if it's in a condition to handle it.

According to Lee #2, though, you are wrong to drop below 7.2gr. But several sources discredit the Lee manual and demonstrate that the Lee minimum is not in fact the true minimum load available for the cartridge.
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