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Old January 1, 2006, 01:24 PM   #1
jdm92584
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336rc in .35rem

what bullets have you guys found good out of the marlin 336 in .35 rem with a 20 inch barrel? just wondering on this to can i load a handgun bullet with the same diameter but just lighter than the ones made specifically for 35? just a idea of how to make cheap plinking shells for it?
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Old January 1, 2006, 02:01 PM   #2
Leftoverdj
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Sure, gets done all the time. Pistol bullets are nominally .001 smaller, but that's not enough to be a problem. The Rem 180s sold by MidSouth and others would be a good cheap choice. Crimp groove is too far out, but you could use the Lee crimper or just partially load the magazine.
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Old January 1, 2006, 02:34 PM   #3
Harley Quinn
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They now have some with rubber tips

That way you don't have to worry about the 'going off in the mag' routine.

That is one of the reasons I still have my 35 cal Marlin 336, the bore is really close to the 357 and you can get pistol bullets that will work. You can jack um up a little and watch the fur fly on smaller stuff.

I knew quite a few who just went with a pointed then a flat or round nosed and then the next was a pointed. But hey, in a hurry you could goof up. So I never did that. But with this new rubber pointed, it could be the bullet of the future for the tubular mags.

With the pistol bullets I like the semi wad cutter in copper jacketed.

In the Marlin micro grove it does not handle lead well so I would stay away from it. One of the reasons they changed there groving in the 45-70's was to be able to handle lead better, since they were stepping up to the hard cast by buffalo and garret.

I was going to trade in my 35 for a 358 but decided not to. Shoots sweet and it is a killer out to 150 yds on most stuff in America. I don't think I would go for the bigger bear but hey, if that is what you have and the shot is there go for it, have a good hand gun for back up,(44 mag) and live a little. Good adrenaline rush.

Harley
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Old January 1, 2006, 03:04 PM   #4
somerled
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I wouldn't use anything lighter than 158 grains when using .357 pistols bullets in the .35 Remington. The lighter bullets are too fragile.

RCBS makes a 2-cavity mold that produces 200-grain FP gas check bullets--35-200-FN.

One can buy .357/.358 grain cast plainbase bullets that weight 180 or 190 grains. They would work if velocities were kept below 1600 fps.

The 180-grain, .358 in. Speer Hot-Cor FPs are fairly affordable when bought in bulk packs of 500.
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Old January 1, 2006, 03:23 PM   #5
Leftoverdj
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Quote:
In the Marlin micro grove it does not handle lead well so I would stay away from it.
News to me. News to most other serious cast bullet shooters, too.

That's one of the stories that get told and retold by folks who have never worked seriously with microgroove barrels. Marlin's and NEFs will shoot about as well with cast as they will with jacketed if you know what you are doing:

1. Bullet must be larger than groove diameter and those barrels tend to run big. .310 or .311 is as small as I would try in a .30-30.

2. Barrel can't have any tight spots.

3. Use gas checked bullets if you are going over 1200 fps.

4. Bullet hardness must be a match to the pressure level.


That's about it. Follow those four rules and you'll get decent results. Inch at fifty yards is my criteria.
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Old January 1, 2006, 04:53 PM   #6
Harley Quinn
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leftoverdj

I guess we just basically differ in what we do. The Handloading handbook #48 by Lyman is quite informative. I also have their #45 I bought it for $6.75 some time back in the early 80's.

If Marlin did not think it was something that was a negative instead of a positive, why did they change their rifling to regular lands and groves in the big bore 45-70s and others? Accuracy was one of the reasons I understand.
Pressures was another, due to lead build up.

You might want to hone up on some of the advantages and disadvantages of lead. If you go to the Marlin site they even discuss it. But heck what do they know.

You like to shoot lead, cast and such. Good for you. Hope you are using all the precautions and such. I hear Diane Feinstein is trying to ban lead as we write.

I had a real good friend back in the 80s, all he shot was lead, casted, tested for hardness etc. Died early, short life span.
They felt that his favorite hobby (lead bullets) was tough on his liver. That and a bad immune system.

I thought we were talking 35 Cal.

Take care.

Harley
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Old January 1, 2006, 05:52 PM   #7
Harley Quinn
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The 35 Remington is .358 dia in its groves.

So the 357 pistol bullets will work fine. The 35 Remington is quite a bit stouter than a 357 mag Rifle and if you are serious about the pistol bullets there are many write ups about it. Just google and you will find them.

The 35 Remington is still around because it is a real pleasent cartridge to shoot. It is still around because people like it. It is versatile, get a good Ghost ring type peep sight, it is quick and fun shooting at the smaller game with the pistol bullets. I do not use a scope on this rifle because it is fine and dandy with a peep.

If you Reload the rifle can handle quite a bit more steam and you can pump up the rifle rounds quite a bit, watch for signs of pressure and go slow, remember accuracy is important also (actually the main reason for reloading).
Cheaper is another, but blowing up your gun with bad pressure loads is a NOT.

Check out the new 2006 Marlin Home page they are coming up with some new bullets and designing their rifles around them. They are in concert with Hornaday bullet co. They are on the leading edge going into 2006 and will continue it looks like. Some of the new things they are adding will fit right into the big picture.

Harley
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Old January 1, 2006, 09:50 PM   #8
Leftoverdj
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Sadly, Harley, the Lyman Handbook fo Cast Bullets is long outdated and wasn't all that good in the first place. Lee #2 is far better. I have the current Lyman within reach and it still lists loads for Alcan powders which have not been available for 35-40 years. We've learned a lot about cast bullets in those years.

You're right that I should have been more specific about .35 caliber. I'm shooting a microgroove Handi that has been rechambered to .357 Max. My bullets are 180 grain gas checked of waterquenched wheelweights with a little tin added. I size to .360 and easily make my inch at 50 yards standard at right around 2000 fps. A .35 Remington could get a bit higher velocities at the same pressure.
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Old January 2, 2006, 01:29 AM   #9
Harley Quinn
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I have heard that the Lee book is a good one, I will have to purchase it. Like you said there is some outdated stuff in the #45 heck it is old and some of it is duplicated in the #48.
I find it real strange that Speer which is such a big industry have not updated their #13 book. Dosn't even have reloading advise for the 40 cal S&W, (or else they are saying don't reload this one )

On going problems with different makers and manufacturs are some of the reasons we have and get bad advise.

You are obviously very knowledgeable in the lead and casting circle.

Edit: I just finished a couple of book reviews on the Lee reloading books 1 and 2. Sounds like # 2 is better then the #1. I remembered that long ago and never did buy that first one. But the second one gets good reviews.

In the Lyman book the story about the 45-70 is very interesting it is so old. If you don't mind a 48" drop in your bullet I guess thats fine. I prefer something a little flatter shooting. But you have to admit it is a killer. That is what they say about the 44-40 also.

Magazine owners/writers, Gun salesman, Martial artists and Car salesman should all have a convention they would get along fine .

Harley

Last edited by Harley Quinn; January 2, 2006 at 02:40 AM.
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