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Old December 9, 2005, 10:41 PM   #1
familywgn
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BP books & reference

Hello everyone,
I seriously thinking of entering the BP craze, but I was wondering if there are any specific references that you would recommend that might show me the basics of this fine sport. I know I will learn alot of info here, but I do like to look at pictures on "how-to" as well.

Thanks again,
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Old December 10, 2005, 12:20 AM   #2
gmatov
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fmlywagn,

Here is a basic primer, http://www.angelfire.com/ny5/shenandoah/Choy.html

It's at another site, but the guy is pretty sharp and concise in his instruction.

After you read that, bookmark or print, please come back and ask any question you like. Come back before you memorize it, I am not saying learn enough about it to ask any questions, you're more than welcome. Just that it is a good reference to base any questions on, and get a clearer answer.

Welcome to the club,

Cheers,

George

BTW, how come you been "lurkin'" for 5 days instead of asking from day 1? You could have asked a ton of questions in that time and already bought the pistol you like. Don't hang back, man, jump right in. No one's gonna bite your head off for asking a question. Ask away, some one has an answer.
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Old December 10, 2005, 08:02 AM   #3
Remington kid
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Here is one book you may want and it's really great and fairly new. It's called :
"Percussion Pistols And Revolvers" .... "History,Performance and Practical Use"
By Johnny Bates and Mike Cumpston. You can find it on Amazon . com.
This is one of the best books I have seen for Revolvers or pistols. They tested all the different C&B Revolvers and Pistols out there and give you the results of different powder and loads. They also have a break down of everyone and what to watch for for problems or small parts that may break and what to do about it.
There is also one on Gunsmithing that will be very good to have for anyone wanting to get into this crazy world of black smoke and lead. I believe it's called Gunsmithing for black powder guns or somthing like that. It's in my shop. It has picures of the Remington 44 on the cover if you search for it on Amazon .com. You can buy most books used there also for much less than new. Hope this helps. If you do decide to buy one and you are new to this stuff let us know what you bought before you load or shot it because there are some things that should be done before you fire it the first time. Mike
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Old December 10, 2005, 09:09 AM   #4
mec
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Also, search all the black powder discussion boards for posts and sticky-notes by Gatofeo. His "how best to use a black powder revolver" is a sticky on the black powder forum of thehighroad.org.

And, by all means, follow Remington Kid's recommendation and buy "Percussion Pistols and Revolvers" It will cost you only 16.95 plus shipping and being the co-author, my percentage will come to about eighty four cents.
and PS: I just remembered that Barnes and Noble had decided to pay me a bigger royalty if you order it from them.
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Old December 10, 2005, 10:07 AM   #5
Remington kid
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Mec, I never knew you had anything to do with that book but if I had I would have told you how great it is. Good info and reading from all the stories and great info for anyone interested in BP guns. All in all one of the nicest books I have on the subject.
Tried to email you or send a private message but they are blocked so I'm just stateing it here. Get the book guy's but buy from Barnes and Noble, Mike
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Old December 10, 2005, 10:20 AM   #6
mec
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I thought I had announced myself in one of the earlier posts on the subject. I didn't enable private messages here because the instant notification doesn't work and I believe it has something to do with incompatable ISPs.

I have much appreciated your frequent mention of the book-which seem to have directly resulted in several sales, as well as your reports on some of your experiences.

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Old December 10, 2005, 01:09 PM   #7
Remington kid
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Mec, Your more than welcome and glad you are selling some of the books and I'm sure the more word gets around about it the more you will sell. That had to take you guy's some time to put togeather and there is a world of knowledge in that book.
Your shooting stance looks great but I can't figure out if all that smoke is from the revolver or the shooters pipe,
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Old December 10, 2005, 05:00 PM   #8
mec
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you're the second guy to accuse the pipe.
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Old December 11, 2005, 12:57 AM   #9
familywgn
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I know this is a little off the subject, but are brass framed revolvers ok for a first timer? It seems to be less expensive which is a plus. And I don't think I'll be shooting more than twice a month.

Thanks again
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Old December 11, 2005, 07:22 AM   #10
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Quote:
I know this is a little off the subject, but are brass framed revolvers ok for a first timer?
The brass framed revolver would work just fine, especially if you are just going to be target shooting. I would suggest that you stay with light to moderate powder charges like in the range of 25-30 grains of BP and not more than that. It isn't dangerous to shoot larger charges in the brass frame, but you will wear it out much sooner. Brass is much softer than steel and will de-form over time if you shoot heavy charges in it.
Good gun for targets, and sure would be a beauty shined up and hanging on the wall between shooting sessions!
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Old December 11, 2005, 09:15 AM   #11
Smokin_Gun
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1st time gun

Quote:
I know this is a little off the subject, but are brass framed revolvers ok for a first timer? It seems to be less expensive which is a plus. And I don't think I'll be shooting more than twice a month.
Familywgn I would strongly advise you to get yourself a steel Rev for three reasons.
1) Durability/longevity-for $164.99 1851 Navy .36 caliber Pietta at Cabelas vs their $109.99 brass frame which is in .44cal.(recoil ring gets damaged quite easily, arbor stretches out the frame ad loosens with normal use)

2)Authenicity-Colt never made a brass frame revolver let alone in .44 caliber. And they are not accuate as to the Brass ones made by the South during the War of Attrition...i.e. Griswolds or Dance & Brothers.

3)If you ever did want to sell it you'd get about $50 maybe $75 for a brasser once it's been fired.
Believe me a steel frame .36 cal is a much better investment if you was just starting out.
$164.99 Cabelas

$109.99 Either Brass one

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Old December 11, 2005, 09:19 AM   #12
mec
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agree with that. just the stress of seating compressed charges stresses the brass frames. One guy reported that he bent his brass remington seating a tight ball. Not too surprising when you look at the small amount of metal at t he bottom-front of that frame.
A friend of mine has been shooting these things almost since they started importing them. His first was a brass frame navy and he shot it quite a lot. There was a bumper crop of jackrabbits and he hit one about every four shots. Frame stretched and the cylinder was banging back and forth pretty good. He screwed the arbor in and tightened it up. Shot it loose again and repeated the process. That was about it for the revolver.
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Old December 11, 2005, 09:35 AM   #13
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Mec, I have a 45 year old Belgium 1860 Army that I bought worked on some and is still a shooter, shows how long the steel ones can last...and I mean it had been shot a whole lot. The shield ring is wavey from the recoil of the cylinder. I proudly display this one over the mantle.
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Old December 11, 2005, 09:46 AM   #14
mec
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The first replica revolver I ever saw was a Belgian Army -cased with a stock. It was about 1964 and the owner was a guy I was in high school with. It was highly interesting and mysterious.

Have you had to replace broken springs or other lock parts?
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Old December 11, 2005, 01:52 PM   #15
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Homemade Mainsprings/Nippon Steak Knives

Just the mainspring is all I replaced, as it snapped when I took it apart to inspect it...the mainspring in it looked homemade and ground on a wheel. I still have maybe I'll take a pic of it and post it sometime.
You may laff at this, but it worked. Sometimes I have way too much time on my hands and my mind gets busy. I happened to be having dinner in my office while trying to think of what I have to make a mainspring out of. I was having Ribeye steak. Looked at the mainspring looked at the steaknife, made of fine heavey guage Japanese stainless steel...not the kind you can bend and they stay bent but the kind that springs back. I said to myself, "Self that'll work".
Took out Mr. Dremel made an exact matching fit including the screw hole and beveled edges, also a slight bend to it. Damn it if wasn't as smooth as my Uberti 1851 and lighter than my Pietta 1860. "Believe it or not...if you ever get stuck or can't wait to orget one, it works and tempered stainless steel to boot."
I did make one for a SILE N.Y. INC. .44 brasser I sold also.
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Old December 11, 2005, 03:23 PM   #16
mec
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That's a good one. I've replaced hand spring with the large flat curling type bobbie pins. On some of the early replicas, the stuff was actually better metal than the original. The trick is being able to get it fastened into the hand slot without busting the hand. I've used paper clips for trigger=bolt springs too. Not very well tempered and tend more to bend than spring but they can work in a pinch.
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Old December 11, 2005, 05:07 PM   #17
4V50 Gary
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If you would like to read about rifles, Ned Roberts' The Muzzleloading Cap Lock Rifle is a fascinating book and difficult to put down. There are other modern books, like the Lyman Black Powder Handbook that is worth picking up.
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