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Old September 4, 2005, 07:31 PM   #1
tomf52
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Lee Factory Crimp Die Question

Hello all. I'm back again with another crimp die question. My Redding die (Profile Crimp) is back at the factory awaiting an analysis by them if it's good or bad (posted question on this board last week). Meanwhile while browsing the net and some catalogs, came upon the Lee Factory Crimp Die and wonder if that would be a better tool to use. Any opinions out there as to how well they do or do not work or any other thoughts on the subject? Basically, I'm trying to reduce to a minimum the working of the case mouth by too much stretching (expanding and crimping) and get a good crimp on the bullet at the same time.Thanks' Tom
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Old September 4, 2005, 10:08 PM   #2
Robert M Boren Sr
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I use the lee factory crimp die on all of my stuff, it's one of the best tools I have. It has helped my loads in a number of ways, the most inportant being a better ignition and more consistant burning of the powder. Accuracy has improved also. I love the thing.
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Old September 5, 2005, 08:37 AM   #3
tomf52
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For Mr Borren

From what I can make of it on their website, it looks as though the factory crimp die has a collet type arrangement that squeezes the case mouth tight around the bullet. Is this correct? Also if that is the way it works, can you control the amount of "tightness" of the case mouth on the bullet? Presently have that Redding Profile Crimp die back at Redding awaiting their look into it but want a way of reducing the total working of the case mouth to prolong case life and give better ignition.HAve found that the flaring die I have from RCBS seems to work better (less stress of the metal)than my Lyman set, but haven't been happy with any of my crimping operations to date. Thanks much for your reply and input. Tom
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Old September 5, 2005, 08:39 AM   #4
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For Mr Boren

My apologies for the incorrect spelling of your name on the previous post. Tom
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Old September 5, 2005, 09:40 AM   #5
Olaf
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Yes, it's very simple to control the amount of crimp you will get with the Lee FCD. Simply adjust the die so that the base touches the shellholder, when the press is just about fully closed. Then, by simply using LIGHT pressure on the lever (as opposed to HEAVY pressure)....a light crimp will result. You can vary how far the die is adjusted into the press, to make it easier to feel when the collet sections just close, but, in any case, do NOT put heavy pressure on the press handle...because this can damage the die. A light effort is all that's needed. A bit of practice will help with this. I also think that this is one point in the process at which users of hand presses (rather than bench-mounted models) may have an advantage. With my hand press, "feel" is never a problem.

As for case life issues.....so far, I've noticed no reduction in case life since I began using the Lee FCD.

Last edited by Olaf; September 5, 2005 at 10:24 AM.
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Old September 5, 2005, 10:56 AM   #6
impact
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One thing I really like about the Lee factory crimp. Is that there is no pressure put on the case wall. You will never get case bulge or have a shoulder pushed out with a Lee factory crimp die. The first die I bought was for my 223 in a Bushmaster varmint gun. That was nice to crimp a case and not worry if all the case lengths were the same.
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Old September 5, 2005, 11:34 AM   #7
Robert M Boren Sr
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You can put as much or little crimp as you want on the bullets. You screw the die till it just toutches the shell holder, then back off on the top of the adjuster, run your bullet in and turn the adjuster down till it just toutches the brass, then take 1/4 turns till you get the desired crimp. It's fast and easy. Those dies have a carbide sizing collet at the bottom that takes the shell to it original specs, so you supposedly can't over crimp, it sizes going in and coming out.
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Old September 5, 2005, 03:46 PM   #8
RERICK
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lee factory crimp die thread

go here it will give you what your looking for.This was just about a week ago all about the Lee factory die


http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=178125
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Old September 5, 2005, 04:32 PM   #9
Zekewolf
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There are two FCD's. One for rifles, (collet type) one for handguns. (not a collet type.) They operate differently.
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Old September 5, 2005, 05:58 PM   #10
WESHOOT2
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case by case

Fact = a case is good one time, then it's no longer as good.

Case life in revolver cartridges is long, unless ham-handed techniques get used.

The Lyman 'M' flare die is the best inexpensive least mouth-working die.

The Redding die is one well-proven performer.

So's the LEE, but not (nearly) as good for revolver cartridges.
Mandatory IMNSHO for auto cartridges, though.

"Crimp" is not the same as 'case neck tension'; the two are not interchangeable. They do different jobs........

Where you at? Maybe someone can drive over and take a look, maybe help you.



Just looked, got over eight Redding Profile Crimp dies, three for 44, two each for 41 and 45 Colt, and at least three in 357; actually I don't know how many I own....
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Old September 5, 2005, 08:40 PM   #11
BigJakeJ1s
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Lee now has collet type FC dies for bottleneck pistol cartridges (357 sig, 7.63 mauser/7.62 Tokarev, etc.), in addition to the rifle cartridges. The straight wall pistol cartridge FC dies are not collet type, but still post size the finished round. The one I have for 45 colt is a roll crimper.

Hope this helps,

Andy
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Old September 6, 2005, 09:21 AM   #12
Zekewolf
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BigJake: I was aware that Lee's now making a collet crimp FCD for handgun bottlenecks. So, do those FCD's post-size, as do their dies for straightwall cases?
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Old September 6, 2005, 09:14 PM   #13
BigJakeJ1s
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I mis-spoke; I did not intend to imply that the collet FC dies post-size (at least the 7.62 tok FC die I have does not, and all the bottleneck pistol FC dies have similar parts). In reality, there is no need, since the collet is actuated by the shell plate, not the cartridge, so there is no chance of buckling the case. With a straight wall cartridge FC dies, the crimping action is driven by the case, so there is a chance that it could buckle, in which case the carbide sizer ring would iron it back out. I can't imagine that would do the case life expectancy any good, though.

Andy
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Old September 7, 2005, 08:25 AM   #14
Zekewolf
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BigJake: I can attest that it's indeed possible to buckle the shoulder of 223 brass, using the Lee FCD. (You have to really try hard, but it's certainly doable.)

I don't believe the crimping action of straightwall FCD's is such that buckling is a problem, as you're only crimping enough to remove the bell, unless you're roll-crimping. However, there is a distinct possibility of occasional bulges caused in the seating process.
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Old September 9, 2005, 06:57 PM   #15
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On a 45acp, how do you know if you have enough crimp with the Lee Crimp Die?
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Old September 9, 2005, 07:08 PM   #16
Edward429451
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Quote:
On a 45acp, how do you know if you have enough crimp with the Lee Crimp Die?
Measure with calipers. (.469-.471) or

remove the barrel from your gun and drop it in to see how it headspaces. (compare with a factory round if you're unsure how its supposed to look)
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