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Old July 8, 2005, 12:54 PM   #51
zeisloft
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I'm not sure if this has been beat to death yet or not but heres my $.02.
Sometimes we hunt for sport, sometimes for meat, somedays we may want to lay up on a hill top and and make that 500yd long shot. Sometimes I miss, sometimes I dont, but on those days I bring the 300 WM, shooting pad, bipod, and the standard range gear. This is shooting at live targets, not hunting.

There are times when you need a broad sword and times to use a scalple. I enjoy both. I mainly hunt hogs with a 22Hornet, 222, and 22-250. However, on the hip is the big iron. 44 loaded to the hilt with the big 300 grainers. As for the 45, good if you can get them to stay broadside, but angry hogs dont stay broadside. We have bounced some 45s off the scull of some big hogs, after skinning the skulls (for educational purposes) we found the bullets only cut tiny furrows. Head on is a poor angle of attack with a 45 and a 300#+ hog. And yes, light guns will bring them down, it may take a few shots if the first one isnt at the base of the ear. One night a friend and I were sittin up for them on a hill (me 22 Hornet him 22-250) and a big feller came out at ~ 175 yd. Took 4 shots from the 250 and 4 from the Hornet and alot of running on our part but he finally fell to a Hornet in the skull at about 15yds.

Then there are the thick brush runnin and gunnin hunts, Salt marsh, yaupon brush, mesqete, or river bottons. For this I like the 44, a good hot 357 (my load uses 35 Wheelen stitzer bullets seated in 38 spec cases runnin hot out of a Smith 686) and 870 Express mag #2 buck and a partner. These hunts start as a stalk and end with alot of heavy breathin. One note ESTABLISH LANES OF FIRE and do this well before it starts to get western.

As for the 300 WM for hogs, it works. As to getting a new gun for the purpose of hog hunting, get it if you want one. Heck, I wanted a .308 for hog huntin, got a 7-08 instead. I still want a .308. If you need a reason to buy a new gun...well its friday, go buy a new gun.
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Old July 8, 2005, 09:17 PM   #52
Long Path
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A whole lot of this has to do with hunting for the rifle you're carrying.

Rich is absolutely right about shot placement usually being a matter of how you hunt. If you plan to walk up or jump your hogs, better carry enough gun. If you plan to ambush or stand-hunt your hogs, you can step it down a little, because you'll have more leisure.

Rich saw me (from a mesa about 900 yards away) stalk up on some hogs and push my stalk too far before they cut and ran across a clearing. I was hoping to pistol the far one. Now, as I started into that clearing, I could have taken the far one (~80 yards) with a scoped .223 to the earhole, if I had taken a rest on that nearby mesquite tree-- she never knew I was there. But I didn't because:
  • [A]That's not the kind of hunt I wanted to have, and
    [B]I wasn't carrying a scoped .223.

But when the near hog raised the alarm, and the far hog ran, and I launched a shot at the far hog-- I did so with the knowledge that a .35 Whelen pushing a Sierra 225g at 2500 fps will thump a hog, if I can hit the boiler room. Unfortunately, I didn't do my part, and I threw my shot (high, it felt), and I missed it clean. No blood, no hide, definitely no thump of bullet hitting hide. 10 minutes later I snap-shot again at a hog at about 100 yards as it disappeared behind some brush, and again missed. I'll claim brush deflection on that one...

While I didn't cover myself with any kind of glory on that occasion, I can definitely say that I was carrying at least a minimum caliber to be trying such shots. I would NEVER try such things with a light deer caliber-- I've seen hard-hit hogs run off before. The only times I've used light cartridges (.30-30 from a trapper carbine and a .22 Hornet) on hog, it was because the hogs were targets of opportunity, were cooperating for my shot, and were small animals (well, I thought the hornet hog was smaller...). I wouldn't recommend light cartridges for designated hog use, if running 'em down.
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Old July 8, 2005, 10:46 PM   #53
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Re "I was told the 308 is to light", while the 308 does not have quite the punch of the 30-06 and some others, as to it being "to light", what might it be that you plan to shoot at?

When I was competing actively in High Power Match Shooting, I found that out to and including 600 yards, I could do better with the 308 than I could with an equivalent quality rifle in 30-06, and good ammunition (Handloads). Beyond 600 yards, meaning 1000 yards, I did much better with the 30-06. I never could shoot effectively with the 308 at 1000 yards. Other people obviously could, I couldn't.

I realize that hunting and target shooting are not the same things, however I could hold 10 ring elevation (12" at 600 yards) with iron sights on a 308 bolt gun. Did you ever take a shot at game at 600 yards?
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Old July 9, 2005, 03:02 AM   #54
Lawyer Daggit
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The 'arm chair expert' you spoke to really does not know what he is talking about.

I have shot most of the wild pig I have taken with a .222 because it has been what I have been carrying at the time that the opportunity arose.

THe .222 is I think a bit too light and creates a need for good bullet placement and often a second shot.

More suited is the 7.62x39 or 30-30. .308 would be ideal. Anything heavier is a matter of choice, but is un-necessary.
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Old July 9, 2005, 11:06 AM   #55
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Although a bit of a distraction from the central theme of this thread, an account I recently read from "The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln" struck me as both humorous and instructive and certainly worthy of sharing with others interested in the pursuit of slaying the mighty hog:

BRAVERY

No one can succeed all alone. Even the bravest heroes need help from time to time. To illustrate this fact, Abraham Lincoln told the following story:

"Back in the early days, a hunting party went out to track a wild boar. But the game came upon them unexpectedly, and they all scrambled toward the treetops, all save one, the bravest hunter of them all, who, seizing the animal by the ears, undertook to hold the beast. After holding it for some time and finding his strength giving way, the hero cried out to his companions in the trees:

"'Boys, come down and help me let go!'"


My guess is that those of you who have hunted hogs long enough understand exactly what the "hero" was saying.

And along those same lines is the Jerry Clowers punchline that goes something like this: Shoot up here amongst us, one of us needs some relief!

Pretty good stuff. Thought I would share.

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Old August 25, 2005, 01:49 PM   #56
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just use the knife.
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Old August 25, 2005, 03:30 PM   #57
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check this guy out

http://www.boingboing.net/2005/03/22..._real_and.html
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Old August 25, 2005, 06:26 PM   #58
diggs
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we'll see

I'm going hog hunting in AK in Sept. I'm taking a .243, however, I'll be in a stand. I'll let everyone know how it turns out(especially if I bag a big one).
This is my first time and I'm pumped wish me luck.

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Old August 25, 2005, 06:52 PM   #59
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Truth be told the 308 is probably a bit too much. Worries about the exit would are most likely related to the fact that the bullet hits so fast and hard it goes straight through. You can buy 308 hunting rounds that will mushroom well and have been 'stepped down' a bit for lighter game like whitetail and hog.
To tell the truth I accidently gut shot a deer with mine last year. A hunter who saw the deer pass by said he'd have put it down for me, but there was so much visible damage (guts hanging out) that he figured the deer would go down within a hundred yards or so. I proceeded to track what looked like a 2 mile murder scene--blood and parts of that poor animal everywhere. Lesson learned is shot placement. Use even a 500 Nitro with poor shot placement and you lose the animal. Yet a well placed 22 rimfire round at proper range will drop anything in North America. Oh, and I know there's a bit of a difference here, but when my grandpa wanted to butcher a pig or a bull he used a 22 short to put the animal down.
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Old August 25, 2005, 08:18 PM   #60
here piggy piggy
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.223 in the earhole

I remove hogs from state land here in FL and don't use anything more than a .223 to get the job done. I use 55grn barnes X-bullets, 55grn trophy bonded bear claws or 60grn nosler partitions, and they do the job. BUT you have to have good shot placement (hit the earhole or between the ear and neck). This will take any size hog if done properly. Is the .308 too much gun? No way, but for me it was easier to master and repeatedly shoot well with a smaller caliber...and with the great bullets we have available today the .223 will take care of deer, too (if your state allows it). I have a .44mag (SW629 light hunter) in a bandolier holster in case of a charging animal I can't take down with the rifle, but I have never had to use it for that. I have shot plenty of pigs with the .44 mag and it drops em quick, but the muzzle blast and temporary hearing loss takes the fun out of it for me (I don't like hearing protection in the field, and I can't afford the expensive game ear type thingies). You can use claymore mines and grenades if you want, but lighter calibers will do the job if you do your part.
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Old August 29, 2005, 12:50 AM   #61
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They have Wild Pigs in Alaska?
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Old September 12, 2005, 01:55 PM   #62
diggs
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I miss typed, sorry in AR.

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Old September 12, 2005, 05:59 PM   #63
C Philip
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A little off topic, but how would the 8mm Mauser round preform for hog hunting?
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Old September 12, 2005, 07:17 PM   #64
chemist308
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If a 308 will, an 8mm (German equivalent of the US military 30-06) surely will.

Perhaps we should use the 500 Nitro for deer...
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Old September 12, 2005, 10:52 PM   #65
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Curious how 308 FMJ round would do? What kind of wound channel?
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Old September 13, 2005, 11:15 AM   #66
C Philip
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FMJ rounds are generally not a good idea for hunting. The wound channel would be very small, since FMJ round does not expand. Unless you hit the central nervous system (brain, spinal cord, etc.) or the heart, the animal would probably run for a long time and die in pain some time later. Not really an ethical hunting bullet. And if you don't care about ethics, it's prety much just plain ineffective. Over penetration with FMJ is also an issue.
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Old October 2, 2005, 12:22 AM   #67
shureshot0471
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.308 ha what kinda necular power plant you huntin around the biggest hog I have ever seen in TX weighed only about 500 pounds and a .243 would deffintaly take care of him if you are un shure aim for his head
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Old October 6, 2005, 11:13 AM   #68
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The biggest hog I've ever killed I killed it with a .308 and a 180gr nosler with one shot.

Hit the heart and lungs and ole porky went about 50 yards and piled up.

I've also seen a smallish hog take 4 or 5 .45-70's outside of the zone and not go down.

Rich is correct in his post. Shotplacement is not about waiting for the animal to turn broadside when you are shooting a caliber capable of serious penetration. In this case shot placement is about putting a bullet in the boiler room and it can be done from any angle with the right rifle.

A .308 is marginal on a BIG hog from less than good angles.

When I say BIG hog I mean narly tough old boar going over the 300lb mark. Not your average little ole wild piggy.

These two here are getting into the larger wild hog catagory though niether are really big hogs.



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Old October 6, 2005, 11:34 AM   #69
Rich Lucibella
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Hey Greg-
Welcome home.
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Old October 6, 2005, 12:45 PM   #70
CobrayCommando
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I think its like big game hunting. You can hunt elephant and cape buffalo with a .375 or 9.3x62, most people do. But there are hunting rifles and stopping rifles when it comes to big game. Stopping rifles are often in .458 Lott and larger. You don't use expanding bullets when hunting these animals so even a slightly larger hole makes a big difference. Of course I've seen videos of a cape buffalo soaking up just under ten of these .45 caliber slugs and a few larger.

So your .22 caliber high powered rifle would be a hunting rifle if you're a good shot (as long as extreme ranges aren't expected), but something larger might be desired in case that thing decides it doesn't want to die just yet.
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Old October 6, 2005, 04:08 PM   #71
H&H,hunter
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Quote:
Hey Greg
Welcome home.
Rich.

Thanks Rich it's nice to be back.
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Old October 6, 2005, 10:16 PM   #72
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I hunted hog on Catalina with Bow and arrow's

Only thing they allowed. So we did it. Goats also.
60 pound Smithwick Citation. Prior to the compound.

Tom Jennings circa 1965/66. It was scary but the thing is you shoot them in the lungs let um run, track um. Lots of cactus over on the Islands Catalina and Santa Cruz. These animals were over running the Islands and we got to go in and hunt them. No guns only Spears, Knives and Bows and Arrows.

The spear was back-up, Had a piece of material going 90 degrees to stop the spear from going in to deep. It was very efficent. Kept them off of you, sometime you went out in pairs one for protection with the spear. Others were always loners. They usually bring the bacon home.

It was a good time. I remember one time a fellow nut was in the path of a charging Boar, let his arrow fly, went into the chest slight angle and stayed in the animal. He bled out down the trail but not before he ran the guy off into the cactus...LOL we picked cactus spears out of him all night at the camp fire, but he got his Boar. He was so pumped and drunk while we were doing it he did not care... LOL Those were the days.

The arrow that we recovered looked like a twisted snake (helped bleed him out) It was an aluminum easton arrow. Some liked wood some liked alum, and others liked fiberglass.

Same old arguements about the best arrow or the best weight of bow. Or the best bow..LOL Same o Same o. I like the Ben Pearson tip because... No I like the Fred Bear tip with razor blades...No, I like the bodkin...On and On..LOL

I am sure the 308 is plenty of gun. Shot placement is the key. Don't shoot unless you have a shot. Simple. Try sneaking up on a hog in the brush with a Bow and Arrow. Rainy season is best. Fun LOL...True story if you don't believe it, don't. Been there done that, as they say. No Guts no glory.

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Old October 7, 2005, 07:34 AM   #73
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I have done a lot of hog hunting. I don't hunt from a blind or stand. I stalk. This thread is pretty worn but here goes. I usually use a Marlin 1890S in .44 mag with Hornady HP/XTP bullets. Most of the shots are 50 to 100 yards. It does a great job and drops them in their tracks.

I have also used a M1A loaded with .308 Win 150gr Speer softpoints. Also works well. The military issue FMJ will also work fine.

I have a Marlin MR-7 in .30-06. I have shot both hog and javelina with it.

Recently, a friend took down a small hog with a well placed (behind the ear) shot with an HMR177.

A .308 is fine for hog. Bullet placement is the key.
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Old October 7, 2005, 02:52 PM   #74
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Hey guys since you all seem very wise about boar hunting I'm looking to do it for my first time. I have a Remmington 700bdl in a .308. I live in Pa (outside of phila) and am wondering where a good place to go for boar is. I'm not looking to travel to far and would be driving there. So if you recommend a good place or outfitter let me know! Thanks
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Old October 7, 2005, 05:20 PM   #75
cje1980
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This is similar to when people ask for a recommended self-defense firearm for black bear. People will tell you that they are 15ft tall and weigh 1500lbs and that you need an Abrams tank to kill them. Many people kill hogs and black bears with 357Mag and 44Mag revolvers.

Last edited by cje1980; October 8, 2005 at 12:47 AM.
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