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Old September 8, 2000, 04:34 AM   #1
gunmart
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i am going to wyoming in october and need a good list of stuff from you guys to carry.
i will be confined to 2 large duffle bags so i must pack lite.i will be staying for two weeks.the guy already has a base camp set up so i am thinking about mostly the gear i will need on my person from day to day.
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Old September 9, 2000, 01:34 AM   #2
Jay Baker
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Gunmart, I've hunted elk with an outfitter in Wyoming, in mid October. First, it can get very cold at that time, so make sure you have a GOOD sleeping bag, rated to at least minus 10 degrees, lower if possible. Layer your long underwear, wool shirts, wool pants, jacket, socks, gloves or mittens, etc. A good, warm cap with ear flaps is best in my opinion, although some people like hats, etc. By layering, if it's too warm, you can put your jacket in your day pack.

Don't forget your toilet kit.

I strongly recommend a top line rain suit, and always have it in your day pack. A "blue bird" morning can turn real serious by evening, and the worst thing is to get wet. I like Helly Hanson, but there are other good ones.

I always carry a three bladed Camillus Stockman pocket knife, and a four inch fixed blade drop point knife on my belt. I always carry a canteen of water in my pack.

Waterproof matches, a Bic lighter, a good compass and a topo map of the area in which I hunt. I carry 25 feet of parachute cord, and a container of Dental Floss. Also, a space blanket. Don't forget toilet paper in a Ziplok bag!! Add some lightweight First Aid stuff: Band Aids, a small bottle of Betadine Skin Cleaner, some sterile 4" guaze pads, a couple of safety pins, and a medium curved upholstery needle.

I carry two Mini-Mag flashlights and a set of fresh batteries and a bulb. One on my belt, the other in my day pack.

I always have some beef jerky, a couple of Snickers, and some raisons, for emergencies. (Your outfitter's cook should have a sandwich for you to take when you leave camp each morning.)

I always carry three rounds in my .338 and ten more in a side pocket of my jacket. Many people take more, and I'm sure some, less. That amount has always worked for me, although I take ten extra rounds in case my rifle's zero has changed on the trip, but they stay in camp. (Luckily, it never has.)

Boots are critical. I take a pair of older Herman Survivors, insulated, leather, and a pair of Sorrel Caribous, with two additional pair of wool inserts. I always take a pair of camp mocassins, as they are more comfortable to wear around camp than boots. Also, if you have to get up in the middle of the night (who doesn't?), the mocassins are a lot easier to slip on than boots. If there's much snow, my "gaiters" really come in handy.

If you sleep on a pillow at home, don't forget to bring it with you. I roll my sleeping bag and pillow in a fitted canvas tarp. I want that protection of my bag. I've seen some real wrecks with horses and mules, and I don't want my sleeping bag getting wet, or torn up.

A small camera is easier to tote than a large one. Take lots of film, and remember to use your flash on the camera for almost all pictures. Most often, people think that the sun will fill in where there are shadows but it won't.

I always take a soft bound book, in case I'm snowed or rained in, or in case I score early and my hunting partner is still out with his guide.

Here's a tip. Take two or three coat hangers. They'll come in handy.

These are things that work for me.I'm sure others will have different suggestions. Have a great trip, and I hope you score that "big six!"

J.B.


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Old September 9, 2000, 10:32 PM   #3
Ron Ankeny
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Welcome to Wyoming, I live here and love it. Jay pretty much covered it all. The weather can run from 75 degrees to cold. Hell, it has already snowed above Dubois twice.

Just remember, October and November can be wet and cool, the type of weather that kills folks fron hypothemia. I mean, who goes out unprepared when it's 30 below?

One last word of advice, avoid cotton underwear and socks if the weather gets nasty. Go with one of the man made fibers like Thermax, or poly. Cotton kills.
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Old September 10, 2000, 04:47 PM   #4
BadMedicine
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Cotton kills.[/B][/quote]

A bit of explaination, It gets wet and is hard to dry, what you want is a fiber that will wick moisture away from the skin. Man made fibers are good, but even plain ol' wool will keep you dry.
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Old September 14, 2000, 06:33 PM   #5
gunmart
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thanks guys.

hey ron i am the one who bought your sako!!!

i use wool and gore tex exclusivly.
what are some of the other peoples advise about what to put in my day pack&gt;?
we will be hunting in the mountains in the morning.about a 2 hour climb every morning i am told so i will need to pack lite.
what emergency and daily things do i need?

what are the coat hangers for???

ps i love diaper wipes for the trip...
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Old September 15, 2000, 12:40 AM   #6
labgrade
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Wool/Gore Tex is good - maybe consider capilene = a bit lighter, more comfortable & just as efficient as wool.

A decent pair of binoculars may come in handy.

If the weather turns real nasty, your boots may save your life = if you can't walk due to frozen feet - you're sunk.

If you're not in shape (don't under estimate a change of a mile or so of elevation as a trival thing) - you should be. A two-hour climb with no air is no fun.
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Old September 18, 2000, 08:04 AM   #7
gunmart
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does anyone have any experiance with fire starters?what is the lightest weight ones that work the best.
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Old September 18, 2000, 08:59 PM   #8
labgrade
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uh, Bic mini lighter & carry a small screw-cap (thingy fo rlack of the technical word) of strike anywhere matches. If you smoke, carry an extra lighter. You don't need anything more.

One mistake I made when first hunting here in CO was to take too much stuff; survival kit, big ol' knife (& a spare or two), too much ammo, just too much stuff altogether that never got used & I got to carry around.

I am not kidding about hauling a bunch of crap around the "hills." They'll take a toll on ya ...

Ask your guide (if you have one) about what he thinks you'll need to have in the field & rely on his advice.

You certainly don't want to be wearing a backpack weighing 25 lbs full of stuff you never need.

Keep it simple - bare essentials.

Hell, if you have to make do overnight in these mountains during October, you're gonna freeze to death anyway.
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Old September 19, 2000, 12:24 AM   #9
Jay Baker
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Gunmart, the coat hangers are for hanging up damp clothing in your tent, from the ridge pole, near the wood stove so they can dry by morning.

My daypack, with one plastic canteen of water in it, weighs about six/seven pounds.

Let us know how your hunt goes. Best of luck.

J.B.
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Old September 19, 2000, 09:02 PM   #10
gunmart
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labgray,i have been told that i need a lighter that can stay on "hands free"

any thoughts on why?
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Old September 19, 2000, 10:29 PM   #11
gunmart
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what is the maximum weight that my pack should weigh?
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Old September 20, 2000, 01:31 AM   #12
BadMedicine
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That depends on you. What's the maximum weight that you can lug through and over the cover and terrain you'll be covering for up to X miles each day? (keep in mind that on any successful hunt your pack will weigh, substantially MORE on the way back to camp.) I went on a 5 day 40 mile hike with a 60lb pack. I wasn't hunting, and the pack got about 10 lbs heavier when I found a big moose antler that I decided to pack out. But for hunting I got MUCH MUCH lighter. You want to be as quite and crafty as possible, and being top heavy and 4 feet wide doesn't help. If you're in an outtfitted hunting camp, and only hiking day trips there's really now need for more than 10 lbs...(camera, gun&supplies, game cleaning & care supplies, daily provisions, and survival gear,) BUT, if you're hiking into the mountains, with just the pack on your back, not to be seen for a week or more, you'll need more supplies.
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Old September 20, 2000, 06:22 AM   #13
gunmart
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There will be a hike in the morning up a steep cliff for about 2 hours I am told.at one point my friend says that we will need a stick to help climb.we will be coming down at the end of the day.my rifle is 8 1/2 lbs. and I have a soft pack.without food for the day my daypack is at 10 lbs.here is what I have so far.

3 pair glove liners and gloves(different weights)
1@extra pair socks
1@extra hat(watchcap)
GPS
binoculars
Thermal top
Wool Gore-Tex jacket
Space blanket
Matches/lighter
Surefire flashlight
Micro light
5 extra shells
Baklava
Lens cleaner
Large knife
small knife(leatherman)
diaper wipes(travel pack)

As you can see i am trying to lighten up my load.i am sure that i am carrying too much but feel that surely I am missing something important.

Any thoughts?


[This message has been edited by gunmart (edited September 20, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by gunmart (edited September 20, 2000).]
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Old September 20, 2000, 06:33 AM   #14
Al Thompson
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Water (lots), camera and sunglasses come to mind. Also - if your wear glasses/contacts - an extra set.

Giz

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Old September 20, 2000, 01:47 PM   #15
Jay Baker
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As Gizmo said, "water!" And I take water purification tablets, too. Sunglasses, for sure, especially if there's any snow around.

As I said in my above post, I don't leave camp without my good, light weight rain suit in my day pack. I've had to use it too many times in the Rockies and Sierra, to say, "Ahhh, hell, it ain't a'gonna snow/rain today..." Uh huh.

JMHO. J.B.
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Old September 20, 2000, 07:20 PM   #16
Ron Ankeny
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OK, I'll play. In addition to the clothes on my back, gloves and binos, I carry the following items in my day pack or fanny pack:

A small first aid kit, (band aids and aspirin a minimum, I also carry narcotics and I mean damn potent ones).

Surveyor's tape to mark path back to the critter. I can't over emphasize the need for this.

Flashlight and spare batteries.

About 25 feet of parachute cord (comes in handy gutting a bull elk solo, tie legs to trees, rocks, etc.)

A Wyoming saw, hell it's Wyoming, or whatever you intend to use to quarter the critter. In Wyoming you can take the back straps out and cut off the legs and leave the entire bony skeleton. Some folks don't even gut the critter.

Hunting knife.

Ball point pen to sign license.

Spare cow call.

MRE and real food too, water.

Toilet paper in a baggie and Anusol in case the old roids flare up sitting on wet grass or lifting hind quarters. Go ahead laugh, but it ain't funny.

Waterproof container with matches and a Bic.

An extra pair of socks.

Ammo. Take enough to finish a cripple at extended yardages under bad conditions. I usually have 8-10 rounds total.

I suppose I am missing something. I don't carry a map, or GPS. No need for them. I do carry a compass, but I have never used it.

The most important survival tool you have is your head followed by proper clothing. Wear layers and stay calm if things go to hell in a hand basket. I have spent the night out in 20 below weather (snow machine stuck in the creek) and it isn't a big deal if you are dry and mentally prepared. More than one person has laid out in the woods with a busted leg for several days and survived. On the other hand, I have been on searches that ended up as body recoveries because the poor folks were wet, improperly clothed, lost, scared, and paniced. Never, ever panic, ever.

[This message has been edited by Ron Ankeny (edited September 20, 2000).]
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Old September 22, 2000, 07:58 AM   #17
gunmart
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thanks ron.sounds like good reasonable stuff to me.looks like its going to be hot most of the time in area91.my freind is there now and says its hot and dry.....i am hoping for snow.
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Old September 22, 2000, 01:13 PM   #18
yorec
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Gunmart,

Good suggestions so far. I'll just add my emphasis on a good pair of boots. You never know just how far you'll have to walk and conditions up there can be "real bad." One other thing, take a headlamp style flashlight. Gutting an elk, it took till after dark to catch up to, is a two hands job.

Weather report: Western half of Wyoming above 8000 feet - three inches of snow and rising (At least it was when I came back down) The radio station said the storm covered the state from border to border, guess you'll get your wish. The only question is: will there be any left when elk rifle season rolls around? Regardless, this weather will have them moving around come opening day.

Good luck.

Hey Ron, what's with the ball point pen? Don'tcha know that's why they invented soft point bullets?
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Old September 24, 2000, 07:19 PM   #19
gunmart
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thanks for the snow report.i sure holp it holds out......

thanks ron for email me about the snow .its good news.did some of it hit 91?
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Old September 26, 2000, 07:46 PM   #20
Ron Ankeny
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Yeppers on the snow. Problem is, it's 70 degrees today. Who knows what will happen in the next week? Snow is nice for tracking and what not, but it takes a tremendous amount of snow to actually move elk...several feet.
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Old September 27, 2000, 07:50 AM   #21
gunmart
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so the old wise tale is not true about when it snows it pulls them off the mouintains and into the vallys?
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Old September 27, 2000, 07:38 PM   #22
Jay Baker
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Gunmart, a foot of snow doesn't even begin to bother an elk in the high country. I've seen elk moved by two feet, but not one.

You'll still have to get high and get into the hard places to find them, even if there's a foot on the ground.

FWIW. J.B.
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Old September 27, 2000, 08:07 PM   #23
gunmart
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jay how high of an elevation are you talking about?
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Old September 27, 2000, 10:15 PM   #24
Jay Baker
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Gunmart, this is really ambiguous, but it depends on where you're hunting. Where're you hunting in Wyoming, and what elevation will you be hunting??

Last year I was hunting east Idaho, right next to Yellowstone Park, and the elk were much higher than we were camped. We were at about 7,000 feet, but the elk were much higher. Our problem was that to go much higher, we had to get into the Park, and of course, that was an absolute no-no.

When i hunted northwest of Dubois, Wyoming, several years ago, again, we were at about 7,200 feet, and as there was a little snow, the elk didn't come down to the area where we were. We climbed the mountains to get to them.

If you're not seeing a lot of fresh sign, then go up and see if you can find where they are.

By the way, drink LOTS of water. Altitude sickness comes mainly from dehydration. Best of luck. J.B.
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Old September 28, 2000, 06:08 PM   #25
gunmart
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as i stated before we will be hunting area 91. outside of cokeville
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