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Old February 6, 2005, 02:00 PM   #1
bikenjam
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Sierra 65gr. GameKing

My only rifle is a .223 and i was wondering how many of you out there have tried this bullet out. I haven't really considered Wichesters 64 bullets just becuase i'm assuming its cheap, but i could be wrong. thanks for any info.
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Old February 6, 2005, 02:59 PM   #2
Robert M Boren Sr
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I use the 55 gr spitzer boattail by sierra with great results. I would consider looking at that. What gun do you have, you might not have theright twist to stablize the bullet also?
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Old February 6, 2005, 03:07 PM   #3
bikenjam
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i have a 1 in 8" twist. I was wondering about the bullets performance on medium game. I like the idea of the barnes triple shock bullets for the 22 cal. but i don't like the price. I was also wondering how accurate they are
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Old February 6, 2005, 03:20 PM   #4
Robert M Boren Sr
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Your twist rate is to fast according to sierras manual. There is a possibility that the bullet will dissintegrate in midair at the faster twist rates. They recommend a rate of 1-12. Hope this helps.
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Old February 6, 2005, 04:24 PM   #5
MTMilitiaman
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I don't know about that. The military uses a 1:7 twist with a 62 gr bullet...if the bullet is designed well enough to even be considered for medium game, then it should be tough enough that it has no problems sticking together at .223 Rem velocities. Bottom line is Sierras have never been found to be that expensive. You lose nothing by trying a box out. If they fail to stabalize or come apart, you are that much more knowledgeble and have a definative answer to your question. If they shoot accurately, impress you with their performance, it is legal in your state, and you personally have no qualms with it, you can try it on game. If not, you move on and chalk one in the "no" catagory. Good thing about handloading and shooting in general is knowing what doesn't work can help us as much as knowing what does...

I am not a huge fan of the .223 on deer sized game and you may want to consult your state's game regulations to see if it is even legal because many states prohibit the use of sub-.24 caliber rifles on game.
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Old February 6, 2005, 05:36 PM   #6
Swamp Yankee
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Are you punching paper or taking on varmints?

There are a lot of good .224 diameter bullets in the 60 to 68 grain weight range. For an all purpose bullet I kind of like the Hornady 60 grain V-Max.

Take Care
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Old February 6, 2005, 09:06 PM   #7
bikenjam
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I'm from Michigan so any centerfire is legal for whitetail. I do use my 223 for paper and varmints, but id like to have a bullet that can take some bigger game. I understand you concern with a 22 CF on deer. All i can tell you is that i would be shooting from a very stable rest at a range less than 200 yards with an accurate gun. Oh, yeah, i love those 60gr. V-max bullets as well, with 26gr. varget. the v-max and matchking bullets are the most accurate in my gun.

Another question, would a V-max penitrate far enough for a neck shot on a deer?
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Old February 7, 2005, 08:19 PM   #8
Swamp Yankee
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Cant' say one way or t'other on deer.

Most woodchucks will explode when you hit them with one of the 60 Grain V-max's. I've never been able to recover one to see how it looks after performing its duties.
Hopefully someone else can give some insight into how they work on larger game.

Take Care
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Old February 10, 2005, 11:59 AM   #9
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If you're going after deer, you may want to take a second look at Winchester's 64 gr. Power Point. This bullet was designed for use on deer. While inexpensive, Power Points are far from cheap. I've tested quite a few in various medias, as well as on deer. They expand very well, but generally hold a classic mushroom shape, something that I can't say about some bullets costing a lot more. Sierra makes some of the most accurate bullets I've ever shot, but they tend to be fragile. This is not necessarily a problem with a larger caliber, but with a .223 it could be a big problem.

I have no problem whatsoever with using .22 cals. on deer sized game. Just make sure to use a decent bullet. For the record, I would not use V-Max's on deer, or any varmint bullet for that matter. If you want inexpensive, check out the 64 gr. Power Point's. For a little more money you can choose from Partitions, Scirrocco's, and X- Bullets that have all been designed to give optimum performance on deer .

Hope this helps! Good hunting!
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Old February 10, 2005, 01:12 PM   #10
bikenjam
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I'll definitly take a second look at those 64gr. power points, but a big concern of mine is the accuracy. I would be shooting these bullets through an accurate gun, so i would hope that the bullets would at least hold an inch group at 100 yards. How have they shot for you?
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Old February 11, 2005, 04:01 PM   #11
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I have always got very acceptable accuracy with the Power Points. In fact, I have a 7mm Rem. Mag. that thrives on 150 gr. Power Points. But, every rifle is different. I'd be very surprised if you couldn't get at least close to m.o.a. accuracy, especially since you have an accurate rifle to begin with. Remember though, 2 inch groups will kill deer all day. I personally won't compromise the terminal performance of a bullet just to shoot smaller groups.

The 64 gr. Power Points are really inexpensive. It couldn't hurt to try a few through your gun. If you don't get the accuracy you need, then try something else. Another "non-premium" bullet that I've heard good thinhgs about is the 55 gr. Hornady Spire Point, WITHOUT the cannelure. I have never used this bullet on game, but I do know of those who have. It seems to hold together well enough to penetrate on broadside shots.

Hope this helps. Let us know what you decide on and what your results are.
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Old February 11, 2005, 04:32 PM   #12
bikenjam
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A big reason i was asking is i'm going to greenbay and they have a big sporting goods store and i was going to pick up some stuff. And yes, i let you know which i get and i'll let you know how they are.
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Old March 31, 2005, 08:21 PM   #13
556223
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Bikenjam -
Ruger #1 is spot on in his info. The 64gr. Power Points will work fine for a deer load if you feel the need. The bullet will NOT spin apart in your 1-8" twist as I have watched more than 50,000rds of this stuff go through our PD's 1-7" guns with no problems. At autopsy, I can confirm that this bullet mushrooms with very little fragmentation, at least on humans. Do NOT use 60gr. V-Max bullets in a deer load as it fragments too much, giving insufficient penetration for your task; it is a varmint bullet and works fine for that purpose.

During a 2003 Montana muley hunt, my partner's 12yr old son dropped a 28" buck with a 90yd broadside shot with my old Sako .223 and the 64gr load. The buck was not spooked (didn't know we were there) and on impact he took 5 steps up the hill, turned, came back, and fell on his nose on the spot where he was initially hit. He was double-lunged and both lungs were pretty torn up. While the 64gr. did a fine job, the set-up and shot placement were picture perfect. This load will do the job, but only if you do yours. There is a reason why most states do not allow .22s on big game and it is not because they won't work with the right loads. It is because the basic U.S. hunter is ignorant as to bullet contruction and terminal ballistics, and if left to make their own decision, would invariably chose the wrong bullet.
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Old March 31, 2005, 09:25 PM   #14
bikenjam
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Thanks for your reply. I know that the V-max would not work well for a lung shot, i was wondering about how it would work on a neck shot. The main reason i'd like to hunt with my AR-15 is because i'm only in college and its my only centerfire. Also, i'd much rather have a rifle i'm familiar with than one of my dad's deer guns.

I just tried those 64 grainers at 300 for accuracy and they held about a 3"-4" group. Not too bad, but i have other loads that shoot better. I'm deffinitly curious on how they will do on deer.
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Old April 2, 2005, 03:58 AM   #15
556223
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Bikenjam -
For hunting big game, bullet performance is much more important than pure accuracy. As long as accuracy is acceptable then go with the best performing bullet for the task. Your AR is shooting those 64gr bullets extremely well as most hunters can't shoot a 3-4" group at 300yds no matter what rifle is at hand. But for deer and a .223 I would suggest that you stay within 200yds to maximize bullet performance. The game isn't just to see if you can poke a hole in a deer, it is about putting the animal down quickly and humanely. I would also suggest that you stay away from neck shots as thay lead to more wounded than dead animals. Neck shots should actually be called spine shots as a hit to the spine in the neck is the only place in the neck that will give you good results. Most hunters could not actually draw in the spine on the picture of a deer, let alone hit it with any regularity. Shots to the neck that hit the spine drop the critter like a sack, but most neck shots will blow out the trach or esophagus leading to the slow death of the lost animal. I won't hunt with anyone who claims to be a neck shooter as I prefer to spend my hunting time hunting, not helping them try to find their neck shot deer/elk. Been there, done that too many times over the last 40 seasons. But as usual, your mileage may vary.
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Old April 2, 2005, 08:50 AM   #16
bikenjam
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very good advise. The reason why i was shooting that load at 300 yards it just becuase i was tring a target load out at that range and i figured id try the power points out. Also, i think the maximum range id see a deer where i hunt would be 200 yards and most around 50-75. I heard some nice horror stories too about neck shots. My dad also recomends not taking nect shots.
Again, i really appreciate all the info
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