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Old March 20, 2005, 09:18 PM   #1
onthedrums
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Most accurate?

I know this has been asked to death, and I know they're are as varied opinions as they're are cartridges.But disregarding all the little variables that come into play in benchrest shooting, I'd like to know what everyone's opinion on the best cartridge for this would be out to 3 or 4 hundred yards.I've been shooting from the "bench" for almost 30 yrs. trying to get the most out of my rifles, so I'm not at all new to guns, hunting, or target shooting.I've done alot of accurizing on my own stuff and my buddies have also turned to me a few times for different things including load developement.My varmint guns are my favorites because I seem to always shoot better groups with them.Top dog in my pack is my little custom 722 Remington in .222.
I'm planning on building me a benchrest type gun for my next project as I'm just finishing a custom Mauser in 30-06 for hunting.
Not really for serious competition, just want something really straight shooting.(Having to buy new dies ect. isn't an issue just so you'll know.)
I've done some research on this and studied lots of match results but I'd like to know you guys' opinions.
Thanks in advance.
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Old March 21, 2005, 04:05 PM   #2
Sturm
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onthedrums, the .222 Rem. has a well deserved reputation for accuracy, so at 300-400 yards and the fact that you really like it anyway, I would just ask, what else really matters?

I watched the Browning benchrest competition a few years ago where the shooters were allowed to use the BOSS system to match the barrel harmonics to their loads in several different calibers and I believe they were shooting at 300 yards. The winner used the CR Boss in .22-250 and his victory was pretty decisive. Could have just been the shooter, or his ability to tune the BOSS system, or whatever. I can't remember if any competitiors shot the .222 and my oppinion of the .22-250 is probably a little skewed, because all of them that I have ever fired were tackdrivers. The best of the lot was probably a Remington 788 with a 24" barrel I bought in 83 that would shoot sub 1/2" MOA with any factory load I fired through it at 55 grains of bullet and the twist rate of most .22-250's is pretty specific to that weight. In my part of the country, the .22-250 is king and probably used for things it was never designed for to begin with. Long distance Coyote shooting is how it earned its rep in central and West Texas.
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Old March 21, 2005, 05:30 PM   #3
Jim Watson
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300-400 yards is kind of betwixt and between. I think I'd lean toward the match rifle side with high BC bullets rather than the usual light benchrest stuff. A fast-twist .22 or 6mm PPC, maybe? There are all manner of 6mm wildcats carefully computed to keep a 107 grain bullet supersonic to 1000 yards, but not a whole lot faster so as to keep density of loading up and barrel erosion down. A .22-250 that would handle the 80 grainers would be interesting.
But I am a pretty casual rifle shooter.
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Old March 21, 2005, 06:05 PM   #4
hivel37
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As indicated by Jim, there are plenty of choices for such a project. 6mm through .308 diameters. There are probably few wheels left to be invented and maybe this is not new: How about 6mm on 250 Savage case, which has a very good capacity for this purpose. Is this the 6mm International? May as well make it with an AI reamer.
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Old March 21, 2005, 07:35 PM   #5
Sturm
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Now this is getting interesting! hivel37 the 7mm IHMSA is based on the .300 Savage as is I believe the 6mm version. So is the .250 Savage, with a few alterations and more case taper. And of course the .250 is the parent of the .22-250 Rem. If we're going to move away from smaller bores, why not consider a cartridge that has just be legitimized, the 6.5 x 284 Norma, if you can call that legitimate. 6.5's have very high BC's and the .284 Winchester case almost gives it magnum potential if it is ever needed for that. The round is extremely accurate and a pet of the rifle ballistician with Western Powder Co./Ramshot and new owner of Accurate Powders.

One such project I have been considering is the CZ-550 in 6.5 x 55mm, reamed to 6.5 x 284. It is not a short action, but will allow you to seat bullets to a longer OAL, just like the situation with the Swede, either could be fit in a short action if shorter OAL is maintained with lighter bullet weights. This could have serious 1000 yard potential and in fact, has already proven it does. BTW, CZ uses a slower twist in 6.5, that might make a barrel change unnecessary.
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Old March 21, 2005, 07:46 PM   #6
onthedrums
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Thanks for the replies fellers.
Quote:
788 with a 24" barrel
Sturm,I happen to have that rifle.Very good shooting piece.I really like those 788's as I have it in 7mm08 and .308 also.
I was wondering about 6ppc or 6BR Rem. Is there enough difference in the two to even make a difference in accuracy?Which brass is more plentiful?
Thanks again.
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Old March 21, 2005, 08:14 PM   #7
Sturm
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onthedrums, the biggest difference are the parent cartridges. The PPC is an offshoot from the .220 Russian which is the child of the 7.62 x 39mm. The Remington BR cartridges use the same concept, but based it on the .308 case and I would imagine the advantage in brass and its cost would still go to the BR. If nothing else there is always 7mm BR brass that can be necked down to 6mm. Another short/fat idea in 6mm that could be the ticket is the .243 WSSM. You would get a lot of flexibility with bullets and powder selection might find benchrest accuracy well below maximum pressure with high density loads, maybe keeping throat erosion to a minimum while getting performance better than the PPC or the BR. If I were on this quest for a 6mm gun for benchrest and field applications ready if needed, I think I would investigate the .243 WSSM further. Brass will be plentiful and there are already several base rifles available.

Last edited by Sturm; March 22, 2005 at 01:52 PM.
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