The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 19, 2005, 11:23 PM   #1
bfox
Member
 
Join Date: January 8, 2001
Location: Pittsburgh (plum)Pa.
Posts: 95
Buying a casting pot

What is a good bottom pour pot out there today .
Lyman and Rcbs are all the ones I know
of except for Lee . Have a Lee 20 lber Tired of the drips .
Any of your experiences would be appreciated .

Thanks , Bill
bfox is offline  
Old March 20, 2005, 07:23 AM   #2
MADISON
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 1, 2000
Location: Roanoke, Virginia
Posts: 2,678
Casting Pot Information

Casting Pot Information:
The Lyman and RCBS pots require a maximum temperature to pore lead.
I prefer either of the LEE pots because, you can adjust the temperature...
up until it pores...
MADISON is offline  
Old March 20, 2005, 09:25 AM   #3
Quantrill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 28, 1999
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 725
I used a Lyman for 25 years before it gave out. I bought a Lee which lasted 2 years before it gave out. I now have my second Lyman which I expect to be working long after I don't. Quantrill
Quantrill is offline  
Old March 20, 2005, 11:22 AM   #4
CaptainRazor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2005
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 302
I have a Lee pot that has been around for 15 years or so, it's done me a good job, but just the other day, it started showing it's age.
It's starting to leak around the pour spout, I've taken the cover off, but I can't see where it's coming from.
It has always been a dripper, I'm kind of getting tired of getting burns from splashing lead.
I had a friend that used a Lyman pot, I think that's the way I'm going to go on my next one.
CaptainRazor is offline  
Old March 20, 2005, 06:39 PM   #5
klw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 27, 2005
Posts: 118
Furnaces

I've worn out several Lyman furnaces.

I've got three RCBS furnaces. One is so old that it was made by the people, Ohio Thermal, that originally design this furnace for RCBS. All have worked perfectly for more decades than I can remember.

The RCBS furnace is guaranteed for life. No other furnace is.
klw is offline  
Old March 21, 2005, 09:59 AM   #6
highteckredneck
Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2005
Location: Loogootee, Indiana
Posts: 36
reading the posts in this thread I am starting to rethink how much I like the lee that my father has had since before I was born. It has always worked perfectly with no drips. Only got clogged up once. Seems to me that is prety good, but if everyone else has such bad luck with the lee this one is sure to quit
highteckredneck is offline  
Old March 23, 2005, 07:17 PM   #7
Ribbler
Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2005
Posts: 20
Do you guys find that casting your own bullets is cost effective? I've been purchasing my bullets because I heard it wasn't cost effective but I'd be willing to change.
Ribbler is offline  
Old March 23, 2005, 09:53 PM   #8
CaptainRazor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2005
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 302
Cost effective? Yeah, they're FREE!

Aside from a little electricity, (probably no more than a coffee pot left on for several hours), and the "search" for lead, there's really no cost involved after the equipment is purchased.

The moulds, pot, and sizers are the most expensive part, I pick up wheel weights from tire shops, I've been real lucky in the past and they usually just give them to me.
Wheel weights aren't the "best" bullets, but for plinking, you really don't need "match grade" bullets.

As for the Lee casting pot(s), well, they're alright I guess, but I think if you can afford a higher end model, you might be better off in the long run. When this one finally dies, I won't be replacing it with a Lee, if that's what you want to know.
CaptainRazor is offline  
Old March 24, 2005, 12:41 AM   #9
454PB
Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Location: Helena, Mt.
Posts: 79
I presently own three Lee pots. The oldest is over 30 years, the newest is about 10 years old. All work fine and have melted thousands of pounds of lead. Maybe I'll treat myself to one of those $300 ones. Naw, the ones I'm using will outlive me.
454PB is offline  
Old March 24, 2005, 07:29 AM   #10
dromia
Junior Member
 
Join Date: December 19, 2004
Posts: 11
Furnaces

Just upgraded my furnace to the RCBS before christmas and couldn't be happier.

I'd struggled with a Lee 10 lber for years, I'd used the Lee for dipping as the bottom pour never worked satisfactorly and I took the bits out and blocked up the spout, no drips.

However I wanted to get back to bottom pouring so I bought the RCBS, I've also just bought the 20lb Lee as there was a special offer and I thought another pot would be good for pure lead, guess what it drips. Also to be able to see the spout in relation to the mould the damn thing needs to be up about eye level, I don't like having 15lb of molten lead that close to my face.

Can't recommend the Lee, the price is good but in my book the compromises to get that price aren't worth it. Lee does the job but its a hard grind to get the job done, I always felt that I'd cast bullets in spite of the Lee not because of it.
dromia is offline  
Old March 24, 2005, 11:37 AM   #11
Ribbler
Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2005
Posts: 20
How time consuming is it to cast your own? How much should I expect to spend to get a decent set-up?
Ribbler is offline  
Old March 24, 2005, 12:03 PM   #12
Edward429451
Junior member
 
Join Date: November 12, 2000
Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado
Posts: 9,494
Cost etc..

If you go the poorman route, you could be casting for a single caliber for a couple hundred bucks~(Sizer/Luber, scrounged castiron pot, dippers etc) or a with all the bells & whistles kit, from 500 on up to OMG depending on who's equipment you get and how many you will be producing.

I have mostly 2 cavity moulds and cast about 1000 a day when I fire it up, by hand, not bottom pour. Occassionally I'll throw a casting party and invite friends who just love the mystique of making ones own bullets and help just to learn it. Makes me feel like Tom Sawyer a little. Several thou on a good casting party day is possible. (buy enough dippers for friends to use!)

With the price of bullets nowadays, it only takes a couple/few thousand to recoup equipment cost.

Any of you guys use 'Magma Engineerings' Master Caster?
Edward429451 is offline  
Old April 3, 2005, 11:30 AM   #13
Ruger4570
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 3, 2005
Location: Rochester, New York
Posts: 2,136
I use a Lee Production pot and also have experienced drips on occasion. I (beleive, I think,I hope) in the instructiions it says if it drips, take a screwdriver and insert it in the slot of the lift rod and turn it. I have done this and it has always stopped the drips. I usually turn it back and forth, sort of like reaming the seat out and it worked fine.
Ruger4570 is offline  
Old April 3, 2005, 12:01 PM   #14
CaptainRazor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2005
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 302
Yes Ruger4570, you are correct, you can twist it a little and it will usually stop dripping, until you lift the handle again to pour into the mold.

After the thing gets used, even the little "twist" won't help anymore. As a matter of fact, the Lee I have is leaking from somewhere other than the spout. The lead is dripping out of the hole where the spout is...from where..I don't know.
Anyway, I can't recommend the Lee pots anymore, mine is 15 years old or so, but to be honest, it really hasn't been used all that much.

I do like the Lee molds though, they are inexpensive, but that comes with a small price. The Aluminum molds heat up very quickly, and it's hard to regulate their temperature. But, for the money, I have no complaints on the Lee molds....you get what you pay for, and they suit me fine.
CaptainRazor is offline  
Old April 4, 2005, 10:52 AM   #15
cracked butt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 22, 2001
Location: southeastern wisconsin
Posts: 537
If you never drain the lee production pot IV below about 1/2" from the bottom you shouldn't have a problem with drips. The drips are mostly likely caused by dross getting into the valve assembly, not allowing the plug to seat. I tend to be a bit messy when I'm pouring bullets, and keep a muffin pan under the spout so an occasional drip is not a problem.
cracked butt is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10281 seconds with 7 queries