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Old March 31, 2005, 03:49 PM   #76
Shorts
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uhhggg little dogs :barf: I hate 'em, always have. I think they're useless and not much fun. That said, I have one, it was a christmas present from my husband (we're so in tune with each other)

Anyway, our first dog, Chester is a Lab, one of the coolest dogs in the world Codi, our second blah dog is a Rat Terrier (the great christmas gift). High energy, but he hates going on runs with me, and he can't retreive worth beans (that's why I love my Lab). My suggestion, don't get one. They're annoying. And if this hasn't been brought up yet (sorry, didn't read the whole thread), they're needy. Most small dogs are, not just the prissy ones. They whine and wimper for no good reason. He seems to have ADD/neurotic tendencies. Believe me, it isn't pleasant And so far, we haven't figured how to curb this behavior. But my next method will be arriving shortly Chihuahuas I think are fairly useless too. I live with my grandma when I was finishing college and she had a mini/toy chihuahua. All that dog did was follow my grandma around the house, eat and poop on the floor. I realize, that fit my grandma well. She needed company and so did the dog. So, match made in heaven.

Someone mentioned all the time, effort and research going into choosing a new pet, very smart. My husband did the same thing (he's never had pets, even growing up). I on the other hand, had cats and dogs all my life. But it's important to know what you're getting. Also check out the dog parks and whatnot in the area. If you're living in apt or condos, a little land can be hard to find. (One of the reasons we moved into a house, just to get our Lab) So know where to go to take your dog out for some fun. Walks in the 'hood are fine, but sometimes a dog just has to go wild on some land.

My In-Laws have a mini schnauzer, again, not my style, but it works for them. She's not too big, but certainly not "mini". Maybe 14lbs. She's a pretty decent dog. Her maintenance is a little more ince her hair is longer.

Anyway, good luck finding the right one.
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Old March 31, 2005, 04:28 PM   #77
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Shorts

I used to think the same thing of chihuahua's until I got my own. He is nothing like what you describe of your grandmothers. He is very loving and wants to be in your lap all the time but he is fun and loves to play and has a great personality. I think alot of chihuahua's get a bad reputation becasue they are always seen with old ladies or people like Paris Hilton who I am sure doesn't treat that thing like a real dog. I bet your grandma's dog wasn't played with much and probably not been around many other people besides her and probably almost never around other dogs. I guess I am saying that alot of chihuahua's have what people see as bad personalities because alot of them are owned by people that faclitate that type of personality. The breed itself I don't think is nessecarily like that, atleast mine is not.
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Old March 31, 2005, 04:53 PM   #78
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NSO, every dog has a personality of its own but you can mold it into acting how you want. It's all in the traning and the psych. But most people don't TRAIN train their dogs, they just live with them and sorta teach em stuff they kinda listen to, kinda don't, depending on how the dog feels and wants to do at that time.

As for grandma's chihuahua, it was a gift from my mother so we had the dog at our house for a week or, then it was off to grandma's. The pup was only 8-9wks old, so, a pup that young will grow into its owner's lifestyle as well. In this case, it was my grandma. But, this wasn't my first experience with a chihuahua. I'm from TX. Born and raised in Corpus, and frequented San Antonio (grandma's). I swear, everybody had chihuahuas and pit bulls....just think demographics (before anyone freaks over that, I'm of the hispanic pop. so I got room to talk "of my people") Anyhow, the dog was played with, so your bet is wrong.

As for the lap dog business, again, not my style. I don't think dogs belong anywhere on people furniture, it's not their domain. We don't coddle in this house. All dogs live by the big dog rules. Does that mean it's a loveless house, absolutely not.

Last edited by Shorts; March 10, 2008 at 09:04 PM.
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Old March 31, 2005, 05:12 PM   #79
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Well I guess

We can just chalk it up to different tastes then, becasue I grew up with 2 black labs and although they were good dogs I found them a bit boring. I would never want either one of them on my furniture or in my house for that matter, my parents never let them inside the house, they slept in the garage.

I just find it much easier and more fun to have small dogs, from spending time with them to getting them from place to place. I would never dream of packing them labs up in the car to take to my mom and dad's house or over to friends house on regular basis. I like being able to do that with my Jack Russell and Chihuahua and I think it makes them a "better" dog and more social which is good.
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Old March 31, 2005, 05:23 PM   #80
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Yup, different tastes

All my previous animals were outdoors. Dad didn't like animals in the house. He was raised on a farm and everybody sleep outside.

Chester is was my/our first indoor dog so figuring out an EFFECTIVE housetraining routine was something else. As for socializing, he goes everywhere and is excellent in public. I'd rather take him with me than Codi. The hardest part is tossing 70lbs into the front seat of my lifted truck He does fine in the front seat of my truck, and for the Tahoe, we just got one of those gate/separator bars that keep the dog in the back cargo area. He likes that better cause he has more room. We started Chester early with socialization, taking him out at 8-9wks. Our primary focus was get him use to people and distractions and 'the world' so we could take him out when he was full grown and not have him go crazy. Yes, it was still early prior to completing his shots, but it was well worth it. At 8mths now, you can see the work and training shine through. I'd say he's a "good" dog At least much "better" than the little ones.
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Old March 31, 2005, 07:03 PM   #81
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RTs

I've heard the Rat Terriers aren't as hyper as the Jack Russell terrieres. I would like to find an apartment size watch dog (20 pounds) that's not yappy.
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Old March 31, 2005, 07:14 PM   #82
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A friend of mine has a Jack Russell (lives in an apt) and she's had quite a handful. Part of it is because she already had an adult female cat in the house, so there was a lot of distraction there She is a fairly energetic dog and they take her out to the parks a lot. She went through puppy school and passed (that's a good thing right?).

Rats might be a little less energetic than Jacks. RTs are fairly suspicious and quite fiesty, so they will alert quickly to anything out of the ordinary. You can curb that behavior if you discourage it quickly, but if not, you will have a barker on your hands. Rats are not AKC recognized (yet?), but you can register them in another club if that's something you wanted. Codi is full rat from a reputable breeder, but we didn't send in any of his registration like we did for the Lab.

here's a site that might help:
http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/rev...tterriers.html

There's writeups on tons of other pups too so you can compare.
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Old March 31, 2005, 10:32 PM   #83
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Hey, this is my post/thread, I ask the questions here (just kidding all).

To bring everyone up to date: I need a small breed of a dog because the house is very small. Anyone live in a single wide trailer here? If so, you have more floor space then I do .

Okay, I have a decent (not large) fenced in backyard so any dog, large or small, has room to trot (not run, it's not that big unless it's the small dog, then it can run).

The dog, besides being a second companion (I have a cat at the moment, very set in her ways, owns me, does what she wants, okay, so she's the boss) will be my "first alert system". And, if need be will attack to defend the family (me and the cat) if all heck breaks loose. Sure, he or she may be defeated in the process but it gives me time to get the best weapon to meet the threat.

And, I kinda like animals lying on my lap, I guess that I'm just that type of person .

Wayne

*edited to add: This is the first time in my life on the internet and boards that I've actually gotten four pages of posts... cool
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Old April 1, 2005, 12:20 AM   #84
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USP45usp, Sorry I hope you don't think I was saying that you were irresponsibly considering a large breed. I was trying to make the point to the few people who were trying to recommend larger breeds to you when you made clear the reason for wanting/needing a small breed.
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Old April 1, 2005, 01:04 PM   #85
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USP45usp, once you get a dog, and you start looking at different ways you wanna train/raise him/her, be prepard to get 10 different answers from 10 different trainers asked.

We did that when doing training with Chester. Finally we just decided to do things our way and forget the other people. I'm on a Lab Reteiver forum, and it gets so crazy what people think of how you do or don't treat your dog.

We use to live in an 800sqft condo with a 4'x4' slab outside the patio door which was "the deck". There was no way we could bring any dog into that small a place and it would be happy. But you have a backyard which is good. One thing you do want to do is keep the dog's mind well oiled. So go through obedience and manner training. You don't have to do that with cats, which is great...but dogs start thinking on their own and can get destructive

Have you narrowed down some breeds you're interested in?
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Old April 1, 2005, 02:30 PM   #86
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RC: No need to apologize. I didn't take it that way. I just wanted to make a quick "summary" due to the thread is up to four pages .

Shorts: No, not yet. I'm still looking around for a mini-daushound breeder, an Italian Grayhound breeder and Terrier breeders so I can get a real estimate on costs and the hikeup at the pet stores.

I am going to try the humane society again. They are saying that they are overcrowded and they just may "wave" their elitism on adoptions.

Wayne
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Old April 1, 2005, 05:08 PM   #87
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Yippy dogs

It seems like all small dogs are yippy. An animal shelter is a good place to find a mutt, which seem to be healthier than a pure breed. Just as lovable too.

Jim
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Old April 5, 2005, 09:54 AM   #88
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Scottish Terriers

Ok I have had a bunch of dogs, and my family now actually raises a particular breed. Scottish Terriers. These dogs are not too big, not too small, they are sturdy as all get out, and if purchased from a good breeder ($900 to $1200 US) have good bloodline traits. They are loving and caring, but they are very keen and on alert, its in their nature to alert there owners when there is something not right, like say a odd noise or trespasser and if need be they will sink there teeth into a unwanted stranger, they wont back down to confrontation and are great for killing vermin like mice, squirts, possums and alike. For apartments and smaller houses, the breed is great. Terriers are really loyal, very smart, constantly patrolling there homestead and have a extremely determined disposition. When you don’t have the time for a Pitt Bull, or the room for a Rottie, Scotties are great! There are a bunch of good recourses on line for reputable breeders, if you need more info on the breed and to get some great testimonies check out: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nothingbutscotties/
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Old April 5, 2005, 03:02 PM   #89
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Thanks DaddyLongLegs, and Welcome to TFL

Wayne
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Old June 9, 2005, 09:54 PM   #90
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Rat terriers make great small watch dogs. They are not so yappy as you think, can intimidate humans, mine humps dogs 6 times her size for some odd reason and is very defensive of the family. If something is going on outside she knows about it, can tell without seeing if its a person, an animal and has different replies for different interruptions and rather intelligent. Over all a neat little dog.

I just wish she stop humping my pet beagles, especially since she has been fixed long ago and the beagle is a male.
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Old June 9, 2005, 10:01 PM   #91
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She humps the other dogs because she's the dominant one and she wants to show it. Humping isn't about sex with dogs, is about asserting dominance. You can correct this by stopping it as soon as she starts it.

Our rat would try to hump the little dogs at the dog park, they were the only ones he vould dominate. He lived with a large black lab, of course he isn't above him in the pack.

But, rats are yippy. He got a new home because of it.
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Old June 10, 2005, 12:05 AM   #92
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If you want a feisty small caliber dog, the terrier family is a good one to choose from. *Lots* of pluck there in a small package.

Here's Animal Planet's terrier guide:
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/d...r/terrier.html

You may also like their dog breed selector, which poses a series of questions to allow you to quickly filter down the possibilities:
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/d.../selector1.jsp
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Old June 10, 2005, 07:31 AM   #93
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Some years ago I found a toy poodle in the middle of nowhere, she was covered with sandburs standing at the edge of the road in Okla.
Felt sorry for the little thing, so I took her home, long story short, she was a hell of a guard dog in the house, didn't shed yeaaaa!! I hate pet hair all over everything.
That little bugger would go right for your crotch, no backup in her, fearless,loving etc. until she lost her hearing she didn't miss a thing.(10 years later)
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Old June 10, 2005, 05:26 PM   #94
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During my time on this earth I have owned a German Shepard, St. Bernard, Husky, Collie, Shepard mix, and two West Highland Terriers. Neither of my Terriers yap...My baby turned 1 on May 31st...

Be careful because she can tear you apart

Last edited by Bullrock; October 9, 2005 at 05:56 PM.
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Old June 10, 2005, 06:30 PM   #95
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I just helped a friend through the “dog selection crazies”. He’s not a computer guy so I was doing research for him. He drives a Semi OTR. You want to talk about a small room, try living in a truck!!

He cannot carry CCW – company says no + many state laws, but he wanted help against nighttime surprises.

We found him a good dog through a rescue organization. I really recommend you try looking up rescue organizations of the dog breed you decide on. A puppy is a LOT of fun but also a lot of work learning to be a responsible companion. With a rescue you have a pretty good idea of what the dog is like – no disappointments or surprises. That is NOT true of humane societies, there you often only have < 1 hour to decide a pretty important decision with no animal history.

Our friends decision – English Bull Terrier
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Old June 10, 2005, 07:36 PM   #96
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Just wondering. Does this qualify for a yappy LITTLE dog???
(Hey, she's still just a pup! )

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Old June 10, 2005, 07:41 PM   #97
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I dunno been bbitten by them ankle biter Chiuahuas..and it kinda hurts....
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Old June 10, 2005, 07:51 PM   #98
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Capt: A pup??? What is that? A Mastiff? Cute lil thing I think Mastiffs might be part bear! Better keep condiments away from any smaller pets you may have if she hasn't been fed!
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Old June 10, 2005, 07:58 PM   #99
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English Mastiff. She's less than two years old, and if she follows her sire's lines, she'll go over 200 pounds someday. The lesser pets have nothing to worry about... unless they're on my dinner table covered in barbecue sauce. That's where her head is any time I'm eating.... licking her chops.... begging and pleading. Damn those sad eyes anyhow.
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Old June 10, 2005, 08:05 PM   #100
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Ok, guess she is at her full height then - how much does she weigh now? Still has her girlish figure, but easy to see she has a powerful chest - hopefully she is well-behaved on leash, or you could get some serious road rash *imagines you asphalt surfing behind your mastiff* Did you do obedience classes with her when she was still a little thing? How much/what does she eat each day?
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