The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 14, 2005, 08:08 PM   #1
jonathon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 14, 2005
Location: Washougal, Washington. YEHAW!
Posts: 1,872
Reloading...

I got some general questions about reloading.. mainly since I am getting into more expensive calibres and loving everything except not being able to afford more than a box or so at a time :P

So basically..

1) What equipment is involved?

2) How much would I expect to spend on equipment?

3) Are there books I can get, or maybe a class?

Price is a big factor, but if it ends up saving in the long haul.. I can probably find a way to wing it :P
__________________
Romans 12:21

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good


More CZ M52 info than you can shake a stick at!
jonathon is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 08:34 PM   #2
themikeman
Member
 
Join Date: March 13, 2005
Posts: 28
Cabelas's shooting 2005 has all that stuff in it

The Advanced RC Supreme Master Reloading Kit is ONLY $499.
and the RC Supreme Master Reloading Kit is $259.
it looks like they have all the tools some one would need to have.
themikeman is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 08:39 PM   #3
jonathon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 14, 2005
Location: Washougal, Washington. YEHAW!
Posts: 1,872
Thanks for giving me somewhere to look for pricing
__________________
Romans 12:21

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good


More CZ M52 info than you can shake a stick at!
jonathon is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 08:51 PM   #4
Ala Dan
Member in memoriam
 
Join Date: August 13, 1999
Location: In The HOT, Humid, and Mu
Posts: 6,116
The R.C.B.S. kits come with the greatess single-stage press on earth,
the Rockchucker I or II. The old RC I will handle all chores except the
really lengthy rifle cartridges. Other than that, they are identical. A
complete set-up (without dies, powder, primers, or bullets) can be
had for close to the aforementioned price of $259. This also does
not include the brass, which in most handgun calibers is very easy
to obtain. Later on, you may want to invest in a tumbler to clean
your brass; and possibly an electric furnance with moulds to cast
lead bullets. I've been handloading for over 30 years, and so far I
have avoided progressive type press'es.

Best Wishes,
Ala Dan is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 08:53 PM   #5
jonathon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 14, 2005
Location: Washougal, Washington. YEHAW!
Posts: 1,872
This sounds dumb but are the dies for?

I do have a means of melting lead already.. We melt down our leading cutting blocks once and a while to get rid of the gouge marks from the belt cutting thingies. Though I am not sure if I would get into doing bullets
__________________
Romans 12:21

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good


More CZ M52 info than you can shake a stick at!
jonathon is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 08:59 PM   #6
molonlabe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2004
Location: MD
Posts: 296
Here is a tutorial for you to look at. Requires quicktime

http://www.reload-nrma.com/videos.html
__________________
The United States Constitution
© 1791. All Rights Reserved.


I Don't want you in here period...Patricia Konie NOLA 2005
molonlabe is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 09:01 PM   #7
jonathon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 14, 2005
Location: Washougal, Washington. YEHAW!
Posts: 1,872
Thankee
__________________
Romans 12:21

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good


More CZ M52 info than you can shake a stick at!
jonathon is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 09:15 PM   #8
Ala Dan
Member in memoriam
 
Join Date: August 13, 1999
Location: In The HOT, Humid, and Mu
Posts: 6,116
Reloading Dies

are specific as in the caliber you wish to load; ie: 9m/m. .45ACP, .357 SIG
.30-06, 7m/m magnum, .300 Weatherby magnum, etc.

Best Wishes,
Ala Dan is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 09:29 PM   #9
Majic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 24, 2004
Posts: 3,888
For those on a budget, Lee has good equipment that won't kill the bank account.
Casting (where you deal with melting lead) is an entirely different subject (almost an art) to learn after you have learned to reload.
To really learn and understand what you are doing then start off with a single stage press. The progressive presses perfom to many steps at once and a beginner can miss little details to learn that may be beneficial later down the road. It's one thing to know reloading and another to just crank out quantities of assembled loads.
Majic is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 10:45 PM   #10
CaptainRazor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2005
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 302
If finances will allow, I suggest the RCBS kit, if not, the Lee stuff is pretty good too.
I don't think you'll go wrong with either one, but I recommend the RCBS kit(s).
CaptainRazor is offline  
Old March 14, 2005, 10:52 PM   #11
redrooster2
Member
 
Join Date: September 23, 2004
Location: north of Acadiana
Posts: 80
There's a book called the ABC's of Reloading that's available from most of the mail order houses. It will give you a good idea of what you are about to encounter --- a quite addictive, expensive, time consuming hobby. After reading the ABC's I would suggest you purchase several reloading manuals. These books will help you decide whether you want to operate on a Lee budget or spring for a Dillon 650.
redrooster2 is offline  
Old March 17, 2005, 05:42 PM   #12
Blue Heeler
Junior member
 
Join Date: October 4, 1999
Location: Queensland
Posts: 1,043
I only reload handgun ammo. Have tried several varieties of presses and believe Dillon to be the best. I have two Square Deal presses permanently set up for .38 and .32 H&R Mag. If I need to make anything else it's a simple matter to switch toolheads etc. I can make 100 rounds in about 20mins. Some younger members of my family can turn them out so fast that they are already boxed up and waiting to go while I'm farting about and checking that I'm ready to start.
The great thing about Dillon is the Lifetime Guarantee. And it really is - no BS or quibbling. If it breaks they replace it. I have nothing but praise for them and they have always helped me out - Even though I'm in Australia. Parts come by Air and at top speed. The manual is comprehensive too.I should add that I don't make my own projectiles, I buy factory coated - They don't cost much really and I don't have to play with hot metal or risk toxic fumes.
On the other hand, I can appreciate that there are some shooters who prefer to roll their own. The pain,suffering and trouble seem to be rewards in themselve.
Blue Heeler is offline  
Old March 18, 2005, 01:16 PM   #13
CaseyC
Member
 
Join Date: November 29, 2004
Posts: 19
Jonathon,

I would suggest buying a reloading manual, that will give you an idea of tools needed--and a manual is a necessary tool anyway (actually several manuals are much better). Read them. Then you can ask more specific questions. Nosler, Speer, Sierra manuals would be my choices--in that order. Handloaders Digest, ABC's of Reloading, etc, are available. Used ones can be eBay'ed for $5-10. I think RCBS has a video--it is rather exspensive in my opinion.

The cheapest place to buy reloading equipment is (generally) on-line. Midway, Midsouth, Natchez, Weidner's are a few, there are many more. You can find manuals and books at these places also. Do a search.

I am in the definite minority here, but I question if the kits are the biggest bang for your buck. Once you get an idea of the equipment you need (and you WILL need more than what is provided in the kits) compare individual prices of various brands. RCBS is good--has the best warranty any manufacturer can offer. Redding these days may be tad better quality, the warranty is excellent also. Lyman "Crusher" press is not to be ignored. Don't overlook Hornaday. A lot of reloaders love Dillon equipment (especially handgunners). Lee has great engineering and design, moderate quality control, questionable quality of materials. Having said that, the Lee Classic Cast press is a steal at $60-70 on-line price. I eBay'ed one at $55--and I already own 3 RCBS presses. Compare prices on-line.

Expect to spend a minimum of $300.

Casey
CaseyC is offline  
Old March 18, 2005, 02:34 PM   #14
tjhands
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 20, 2005
Posts: 1,708
I agree with Majic - Lee makes good equipment for starters. I bought their Anniversary Kit for $75 from bosesguns.com That's the cheapest price that I know of. All you need are the dies after you get the kit. Naturally, you'll need bullets, brass, powder, and primers too.
tjhands is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08856 seconds with 7 queries