The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The North Corral > Competition Shooting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old November 1, 2002, 04:50 PM   #1
shu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 11, 2000
Location: lower rio grande valley, texas
Posts: 216
IPSC classification definitions

In IPSC rule book (got in .pdf format from their web page)...

.. there is reference to a 'Limited Division' in the Index of the book, but I find nothing about it in the body of the book. Is there such a thing as 'Limited Division'? and if so, what characterizes it?

... the 'Production Division' lists power factor floor of 125, but no floor for major, and does not require .40 min for major. I am unclear. There is/is not a distinction between major and minor in Production Division?

... I have replaced the factory recoil springs in my Glock and Berretta with stiffer springs (intending to reduce shock of cycling the pistol). This 'Internal replacement using non-factory components' disallows the pistols for Production Division?

Thanks for any clarification you can provide.
__________________
If you would have Liberty you must accept that individual security
is not the responsiblity of government. You must. - XAVIER ONASIS
shu is offline  
Old November 1, 2002, 06:26 PM   #2
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 10,901
Were you looking on www.ipsc.org or www.uspsa.com?

Only USPSA uses Limited Division. The rest of the world goes by Standard Division. They are not quite the same.

The main limitations of Limited/Standard are no optical sights and no compensators.

All calibers are scored Minor in Production Division.

I don't think changing recoil springs will affect your guns' classification. It certainly won't if you don't say anything about it.
Jim Watson is online now  
Old November 1, 2002, 07:34 PM   #3
shu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 11, 2000
Location: lower rio grande valley, texas
Posts: 216
Thanks -

It is indeed IPSC, from their web page.

I had heard 'Limited' mentioned and thought it might designate (among other things) limited to 7 or 10 in the magazine.

Six months ago I couldn't spell IPSC. The hard core at our small club have special purpose guns and travel to other meets. At my age and ability I expect not to be more than an 'also ran' out to enjoy a morning with one of my stock guns and keep the attendance numbers up.

I did however want to know how to best fit in technically with what I have.
__________________
If you would have Liberty you must accept that individual security
is not the responsiblity of government. You must. - XAVIER ONASIS
shu is offline  
Old November 2, 2002, 12:32 AM   #4
Mike Davies
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 8, 2000
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 376
Thought I should point out here that USPSA also has a "Limited 10" Division....very similar to IPSC Standard Division except for equipment positioning. In IPSC Standard, holster and mag pouches must be behind the prominent hip bones, as in Production Division. In USPSA Limited and Limited 10, equipment can be worn forward of the hip bone. I would recommend shooting in Limited 10 first...It's called Limited 10 because you are only allowed 10 round max capacity mags.
Mike Davies is offline  
Old November 6, 2002, 11:59 AM   #5
AZ Jeff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2002
Posts: 186
Since you are located in the USA, any competitions you will be shooting will be run under USPSA rules, which are slighly different than IPSC rules. I suggest you go to the USPSA website and download the latest rulebook for the straight skinny.

Now to your questions:

.. Is there such a thing as 'Limited Division'? and if so, what characterizes it?

>Limited Div. is basically an "anything goes" class of pistol, with 12 key exceptions: NO muzzle brake/compensator, etc. and NO optical sights. Otherwise, in general, the sky is the limit on modifcations

... the 'Production Division' lists power factor floor of 125, but no floor for major, and does not require .40 min for major. I am unclear. There is/is not a distinction between major and minor in Production Division?

>Production Div. does not recognize a difference between major and minor cal. ALL pistols are scored as minor cal., regardless of true caliber being shot.

... I have replaced the factory recoil springs in my Glock and Berretta with stiffer springs (intending to reduce shock of cycling the pistol). This 'Internal replacement using non-factory components' disallows the pistols for Production Division?

>Technically, changing spring weight might be illegal, but....Since various manufacturers of a given pistol may have varying weights of springs for the same model/type, it's doubtful that such a change as this would truly be construed as "illegal". Now, on the other hand, if you change from a standard recoil spring system to one that contains a recoil reducer, or a heavily weighted tungsten recoil guide rod, THAT WOULD BE construed as non-factory components, and would be illegal.
AZ Jeff is offline  
Old November 6, 2002, 12:26 PM   #6
RickB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2000
Location: Western WA
Posts: 5,630
Re stiffer springs: You are reducing the shock in one direction, and increasing the shock in the other. The gun is designed for the slide to stop abuptly at the rear of its travel (the "shock" to which you refer), but it is not designed to slam shut faster/harder, which is what you are doing by going to a higher-rate spring.
Most competition shooters use recoil springs that are LIGHTER than stock, especially in those calibers that loaded way down to reach power factor.
RickB is offline  
Old November 6, 2002, 01:56 PM   #7
AZ Jeff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2002
Posts: 186
"RickB" brings up a good point. Shooters usually change to heavier springs because they are shooting heavier than standard loads. In USPSA production class, since all one has to do is make a minor PF of 125, shooting heavy loads is counterproductive. That makes use of heavier springs equally counterproductive. It may, in fact, contribute to malfunctions when a heavier than standard spring is used in conjunction with standard or lighter-than-standard loads.

As far as using heavier springs to save "wear and tear" on the pistol, it actually may make things worse, due to the slamming of the breech with the heavier spring.

Furthermore, in arms such as the Glock, wear and tear are inconsequential factors, as those pistols have a rediculously long service life if properly cared for (100,000+ rounds).

Go with the standard springs, shoot standard loads, and HAVE FUN!
AZ Jeff is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06676 seconds with 7 queries