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Old October 13, 2002, 08:11 PM   #1
SquirrelNuts
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A praise and two questions

I must say that I am very impressed with Steve's Reloading Page. I could spend days on that site and not finish it. I found more answers to questions in three hours of reading that site than I have anywhere else.

I have found a supply of once fired DEN 42 .30-06 brass, which one reloading book I read said it was the best thing out there. I would like to give it a try. The supply I found appears to have used corrosive primers. There is an orange film inside the cartridge that looks like my fired corrosive 7.62x54R ammo. Would it be safe to reload using these cartridges? If not, would a cleaning in a tumbler make them safe? I did a search, but could not find the answer.

I also have some LC 72 brass that I bought from Georgia Arms. The cartridges are once fired by me and I want to reload them. From my research, it appears that LC cartridges use a boxer primer, so they are easily reloadable. I have also seen posts stating that some of the primers were crimped. I do not know how to tell. Is a crimped primer harder to remove? It sounds like it from the name.

-SquirrelNuts
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Old October 13, 2002, 08:30 PM   #2
SquirrelNuts
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I found the answer to my second question: Yes, crimped primers are a pain, but the answer is the Dillon Super Swage 600.

This may seem silly, but I do not know-If the cartridge was originally crimp primed, do the reloads have to be as well? I assume no, but better safe than sorry!

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Old October 13, 2002, 08:50 PM   #3
Gewehr98
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I still haven't been able to read through all of Steve's pages!

The man must have cathode-ray burns on his eyebulbs, as much information as he entered on that website!

(And if I haven't said so before, Steve, thank you!)
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Old October 13, 2002, 08:58 PM   #4
Brian Williams
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please post a url or web site
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Old October 13, 2002, 10:59 PM   #5
tawakoni
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Steve's Pages:

http://www.again.net/~steve/page8.htm

A very helpful site, indeed.

tawakoni
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Old October 14, 2002, 01:02 AM   #6
C.R.Sam
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Nuther yeah for Steve's pages.

As to the priming...once you have swedged or otherwise gotten ride of the crimp...reload normally and don't crimp around the new primers.

Bear in mind that bout any case that had crimped primers is military brass, a tad thicker than civillian specs, and has less internal capacity. Ergo...do not use max loading data. Pressures will be a tad higher with a given powder load in mil brass than in civillian brass.

Sam
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Old October 14, 2002, 02:57 AM   #7
sricciardelli
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The D.E.N. 42 brass you have was made in the Denver Ordnance Plant in 1942, and it was corrosive.

Can you load it today? Give it a mild acid bath to remove all salts, and then a good rinsing. You are only half done. Next, check the inside of the case for roughness and pitting. If it is clean and smooth, use it.

As for your crimped primers, you have found how to remove the crimps. Do not try to re-crimp the cases.

Generally a case with a crimped primer will have a circular ring around the primer (you must have noticed that), but some will have small indents every 120-degrees or every 90-degrees.

Most military brass is a tad thicker than "civilian" counterparts, so when you start your loading, start low and work-up (hell, you should do that with any load, anyway).

Oh...and thanks for the kind words...
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