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Old December 24, 2009, 09:30 AM   #251
Bignoot
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Speed vs accuracy

I learned that just because you had your trigger pull changed from 5.5lbs to 3.5lbs does not mean you will shoot any faster with accuracy, it just means that it is easier to pull the trigger, sometimes when you do not necessarily need for it to fire. Like when you have not made it to the -0 yet, or on the head shot when you miss the whole darn target.

Bob
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Old December 24, 2009, 03:02 PM   #252
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Quote:
I've discovered that the device the SO is holding is not a timer....it's a MIND ERASER!!!
Excellent observation. I've experienced exactly the same thing--I wish I'd said that.
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Old December 25, 2009, 03:19 PM   #253
mrt949
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When you don't shoot a match in over 15 years .And you DON'T HIT ANYTHING . You must practice, practice, or BOW YOU HEAD IN SHAME.
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Old December 28, 2009, 11:11 AM   #254
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fiber optic front sights

I shot in an informal club match on an indoor range last night.

We had a dozen shooters. Three of them had fiber optic front sights on their handguns. They discovered that there isn't enough ambient light on an indoor range for the fiber optic front sight to work properly. That's what they learned.

I relearned that if I try to go too fast and bash the trigger, the results aren't pretty. Fortunately, I only did that on the first stage and then I calmed down and shot better for the remainder of the match.
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Old January 26, 2010, 03:53 PM   #255
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New shooter and new to the forum. This is a great sticky as you are always coming away with something new after every competition. I just started to shooters journal to keep log of all such thoughts.

My latest thought was to give up on speed, focusing more on accuracy and precise motion. Just as the adage 'only perfect practice makes perfect', I think that 'only perfect competition makes for a perfect competitor'. I know times where I have cut that 'perfect' corner while competing just to get a faster time. While shifting this mentality may ding me a little in the overall standings at first, eventually the speed will come and I will be that much better of a shooter when it does.
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Old February 6, 2010, 01:36 AM   #256
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lessons learned

I shot a USPSA Classifier match on the first Sunday in January. It was at an indoor range, but the weather outside was bitter cold and it was pretty chilly in the range, even though the heaters were going.

I was a layer of clothing short, but the match ended before I really took a chill.

One of the guys in my squad can cleaned his gun with MPro7 (a water based cleaner) the night before, and then put his gun & equipment in the trunk of his car so he could make ak quick departure in the morning. His car was parked in an unheated garage.

He had a Para Ordinance .45 with a firing pin safety. The cold caused the water-based cleaner to freeze up, and his gun wouldn't function until he thawed it out.

One of the shooters on my squad was a cop with Chicago PD and he said they had occassionally noticed the same thing when shooting outside in the winter.
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Old February 8, 2010, 05:29 AM   #257
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IDPA classifier match

I shot in an IDPA Classifier match on Saturday evening.

In the past, the times I've finished poorly were because I blew Stage III of the classifier match. For those unfamiliar, Stage III involves shooting at multiple targets from behind a high barricade at 25 yards and from behind a barrel at 15 yards. You can't shoot over the top of the barrel -- you have to shoot around the sides.

In the past, I sometimes had trouble because I shot too fast on this stage and also because I crowded cover. When you crowd your cover, you sometimes create a situation where your firing stance is contorted. This is particularly true when shooting around the side of low cover.

Well, I didn't shoot too fast and I didn't crowd cover, and so only dropped 27 points in a 90 round match. (My personal best with this gun was 22 points down). I didn't have any misses, either.

One of the ROs is a firearms instructor at a local PD, and somebody I trained in the Police Academy. Before we began stage III he reminded me "Shoot at your own pace and get your hits" and I did and it worked.
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Old February 8, 2010, 01:35 PM   #258
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let's see...last match.

My last real match was an indoor 25-yard 1800 Bullseye match at Harrisburg Hunters and Anglers a few weeks ago. I learned there's a good reason that people don't shoot .44 Special in centerfire Bullseye competitions anymore: too much recoil for a job that could be done by .32 S&W Long, or with that kind of recoil a shooter might as well shoot a .45.

Also, if you're going to practice for a match, make sure you're practicing on the right targets. I had been using the old, pre-1993 B-16 targets to practice. The new B-16 targets we used in the match have much smaller scoring rings and are therefore much more difficult to shoot.
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Old February 15, 2010, 03:40 AM   #259
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PPC match

I shot a PPC match at a local gun club on Sunday.

We shot a 48 rnd modified PPC course, and you could shoot as many times as you wanted for $5 a run. I shot the course 3 times.

And I was generally somewhat disappointed in how I did. Several of my routine practice courses are based on the PPC using the NRA B-34 1/2 scale target at 50 feet.

The stage I had trouble with was 6 rnds kneeling, 6 rnds left barricade, and 6 rnds right barricade in 90 seconds. 90 seconds is forever. You almost have time to have a cup of coffee and run to the restroom in that stage. Still, for some reason I shot too fast, and when shooting left barricade/left hand with support, I bashed the trigger and pulled my shots low right about 4 o'clock out of the scoring rings.

On the other stages, my group wasn't as tight as it should've been, but it was acceptable. (We pulled targets after each stage)

I practice left hand with support all the time because it can be useful when shooting around cover. I may never need it in the real world, but it certainly comes in handy at matches, and is sometimes required. (Left hand with support is basically mirror-image for me as I'm right handed).

So, I have to get out the timer and practice that some more.

Still, it was an enjoyable morning. I've always liked shooting PPC and since there was a small number of shooters, I was able to shoot through the course 3 times and be on my way in an hour.

(My best score was 427-12X out of 480 possible. Normally, on that course, I'm in the low 450s or so)
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Old February 15, 2010, 02:42 PM   #260
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Don't forget that when they say you MUST shoot two to the body and one to the head - you don't shoot all to the head. Sigh.
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Old March 21, 2010, 02:16 PM   #261
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Keep a good eye on the parking area...

If a busload of gorillas show up they're here to jump up and down on you while you're trying to shoot!
Other than that it's the same thing I learned at my first match: Hold tight and favor the X-Ring.
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Old March 22, 2010, 08:26 AM   #262
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Listen to the guy who is a former sniper instructor. Valuable info was learned today.
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Old March 29, 2010, 04:35 PM   #263
Glenn E. Meyer
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In training, you reload the gun when it runs dry - no matter where you are. In IDPA, if you have to move and reload - you need to reload under cover. I dropped an empty mag before I got under cover.

Ah, so what!
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Old March 30, 2010, 06:23 AM   #264
Jeff22
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lessons learned

I've shot in two USPSA special classifier matches in the last three weeks.

On the first match, I was able to shoot 4 different guns and shoot 4 classifier stages in each Production Class, Single Stack, Limited 10 and Revolver.

On the second match, I shot 5 classifier stages in Production class.

I've discovered I need to practice engaging multiple targets strong hand only and weak hand only at 10, 12 and 15 yards.

I also need more practice engaging targets partially screen by "no shoot" targets or partially screened by hard cover.

In the first match, I hit 6 "no shoots" (in 16 stages fired)

In the second match, I didn't hit any "no shoots" in 7 stages (of which 5 were classifiers)

And my in-battery reloads are not as fast as my out-of-battery reloads. I'm not sure why, but it's something else to practice.
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Old March 30, 2010, 09:12 AM   #265
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Two things, but I feel the need to mention them both:

1. It's a challenge to remember to use your sights when you're trying to engage multiple tough targets while moving quickly, and using your sights is good.

2. Same rules of target engagement apply to swingers as they do to any other target...as do the basics of calling your shots. Conversely, spray-and-pray works even worse on swingers than it does on other targets.
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Old March 30, 2010, 07:06 PM   #266
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Shooting rimfire bullseye leagues almost exclusively, I found that slow fire was not my friend and I tended to shoot it just like I do timed fire.

This league I switched to an M9 NM pistol to start preparing for Camp Perry.

Everything was reversed. I take close to the whole 10 minutes to shoot slow fire and timed fire is no longer my friend. I now finish timed fire just as the whistle blows to stop.

I've also learned that if all you routinely shoot is rimfire, then centerfire will come as a rude awakening.
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Old April 6, 2010, 04:07 PM   #267
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I went to this year's first NRA silhouette match with a new tang sight on my rifles.

Lesson learned: the match is not the place to experiment with new sights. Don't be surprised if you get the worst score of your life.

There is also probably a lesson to be learned about giving your wife the 100 year old .22 rifle and keeping the brand new rifle with all the goodies on it. The one that I learned is that my wife is some kind of crazy sharpshooter with a Winchester 1906. Somehow I am now a class below her.

On the bright side, though, it was a beautiful day and we had fun.
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Old April 14, 2010, 09:30 PM   #268
jknight8907
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I just did my first USPSA match with a stock Glock 17. I learned that I'm very accurate, but too slow for it to matter. Oh well, practice will fix that. And DANG is USPSA fun!!!
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Old April 26, 2010, 07:50 AM   #269
Rifleman1776
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age matters

My competition shooting these days is limited to traditional style muzzle loaders. Last match I learned age matters. Bad left shoulder. Cannot even hold the rifle to shoot without much wiggle and pain. Downer. Surgery scheduled. But, after that and recovery, I'll be even older.
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Old April 26, 2010, 05:15 PM   #270
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That those pieces of scrap lumber on the ground are not there just as trip hazards, but as 180 reference points.
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Old April 27, 2010, 10:22 PM   #271
Garandpa
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How to win

I learned that if I don't allow myself to shoot any nines, I shoot a lot more tens. I ended up 289 - 6X in a 30 shot match and took high service rifle.
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Old April 28, 2010, 03:02 AM   #272
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I learned that whole PPPPPP thing all over again.

Several stages where I didn't do so well on weren't properly planned. The two stages I did best on (5th overall out of ~106 Production shooters) were properly executed.

I plan to implement a new strategy I learned recently in the next local match and, if it works, will implement it at the next two major matches I go to.
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Old May 2, 2010, 11:09 AM   #273
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Learned at my last ACTS match a few weekends ago that the proper time to open the lens covers and turn on my red dot scope is before the timer goes off, not while I'm running downrange with the rifle tucked under my arm as I fiddle with the scope.
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Old May 11, 2010, 01:25 AM   #274
thug23
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Shot IDPA for the first time recently and found out two things right off the bat that I suck at...

A. Shooting while moving
B. Shooting with both eyes open :barf:

And I thought I was pretty good...until I got here.
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Old May 11, 2010, 10:45 PM   #275
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At my last match I watched another shooter have a meltdown as a result of one bad run. The next run was even worse--as one might have expected and the shooter left the match in an obviously perturbed state.

When you have a bad run or a bad stage consider it an opportunity to practice dealing with adversity, a chance to practice maintaining your composure. Everyone has a bad run now and then, but some shooters let it wreck the whole match for them while others deal with it and move on to the next challenge.
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