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Old March 19, 2002, 12:20 PM   #1
The Barron
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How "long range" can I expect to shoot a .243?

Just got a Steyr SBS in .243
I love it. I shoot dime size groups at 100yrds

My question is how far I can expect to shoot with repeatability. I know that most hunters will not attempt to take game past 300 yrds. I will be punching paper, so really don't need to worry about kill zones.

I have also read that some shooters, who know what they are doing, can hit out to about 800yrds on a regular basis with a .243. Is this true? I would like to enhance my long range ability, and would like to know at what distance I should strive for. What type of ammo should I use, 55grain? 100grain? BT?

I am a new shooter, so any comments are very welcome.

~~Oh yeah, this is also my first post!! Great site you got here, the best I have seen.~~
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Old March 19, 2002, 12:38 PM   #2
Crimper-D
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Using 85gr Reloads

I've been able to shoot groundsquirrels at 250yds using a 6X scope. Beyond that range, the optics would need to be stronger or the target larger !
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Old March 19, 2002, 12:39 PM   #3
Jim Watson
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Not exactly my field, but I do know that some target shooters have used .243s. The National Match Course is shot at 200, 300, and 600 yards. Targets are sized so that a centered MOA group will score 10s. The longer the range, the heavier the bullet, in general. But it has to stabilize in your twist, so a stock barrel would likely be best with 100 grain bullets. Assuming that they shot accurately.

I 'spect a real target shooter will come along with more information, but that ought to get you started.
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Old March 19, 2002, 12:57 PM   #4
Art Eatman
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Hokay. You've learned what your rifle will do at 100 yards. Now, start to work up to the longer ranges; don't just jump in on the very-long distances.

It'll take some time to learn what your rifle likes, insofar as 300-yard or 400-yard accuracy.

As a generality, if the bullets prove to stabilize with the twist rate of your barrel, a boat-tailed bullet works best at long range.

Even if you don't handload your own ammunition, there is a wealth of information about cartridge and rifle designs and exterior ballistics in the Sierra reloading handbook. I think it's around $30, but it has the best treatment of the various factors that come into play.

$0.02, Art
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Old March 19, 2002, 02:07 PM   #5
The Barron
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Thanks for the posts.

I have a Simmons Aetec 3.8-12X44 Ill A/O scope.

Will it be able to do the job at 600 or 800 yrds?
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Old March 19, 2002, 04:12 PM   #6
stuckatwork
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I have never taken a 243 out to 600 or 800 yards. What I can tell you is I shoot shiloutte with a 243. I have hit steel rams at 500 yards. The 80 grain bullets that I use don't have the umph left to knock them over by the time they get there.

As mentioned in an earlier post, longer the distance, the heavier the bullet.
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Old March 19, 2002, 08:35 PM   #7
Art Eatman
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If your scope's crosshairs cover 1/4" at 100 yards, that's 1-1/2" at 600. Might be a bit coarse for precision aiming. As far as seeing the target and splitting it into quarters, no problem. I shoot at my 22" plates at 500 yards with 10X and have done fairly well for groups.

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Old March 19, 2002, 09:14 PM   #8
Mike Baugh
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As far as repeatability you are the most important component.

Back in the early 60's my father used a .300 mag to hunt out west. He was a small man and it punished him but all the guys in his hunting party used .300's or 30-06's. He was getting tired of the recoil and bought a new model 70 in .243 with a Balvar 8 [Bausch and Lomb] scope, every one laughed at him until he took the first deer that year, a mule deer at a little over 500 yards [they paced it off]. The guys all said it folded and dropped like it was hit with a hammer. The next year there was nothing but .243's and .270's in the camp. I would not be afraid to have that caliber for an all around rifle to use out to 450-500 yards as long as you were shooting targets or deer size and smaller game. Good luck, Mike...
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